mini DisplayPort/Thunderbolt

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Tech198, Jun 15, 2012.

  1. Tech198 macrumors G4

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    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #1
    Hearing Macbook Pro Retina is here, I was wondering the idea why Apple a ported HDMI for the new Mac. ?

    My take on this is, everyone at the keynote was really "up-beat" and thought HDMI Mac was a great idea... However, my take is somewhat different.

    Previously, Apple have had Thunderbolt, which were already HDMI compatible with an adapter.. Now HDMI is on board, it feeds up carrying an extra adapter in your bag. To make things better (or worse), they also include Thunderbolt, which you you use HMI adapters for anyway.

    The only exception, and probably the reason Apple decided, is a handful of Thunderbolt compatible devices available. The only reason its not taken of is lack of popularity.

    Apart from that, Mini-display port on the Macbook Pro Retina, (or just generally) could always be used to HDMI connection with an adapter. So, apart from the above, why include HDMI, *as well* as two Thunderbolt ports ?

    This would also mean, customers now have a choice, they can either user HDMI directly, or use an HDMI adapter to connect from mini-display port.
     
  2. theSeb macrumors 604

    theSeb

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Location:
    Poole, England
    #2
    So, what is your point? I am really not sure.
     
  3. Tech198 thread starter macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #3
    mini DisplayPort

    My point is the fact that Thunderbolt port can carry HDMI with an adapter. Thats what we've been doing so far.

    So why have HDMI ?
     
  4. vladzaharia macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    #4
    ... Because it's a port many people use, especially now that it's standard in even the most low-end of TVs bought. HDMI over MiniDP (It's using MiniDP, not TB's standard) is not officially supported by Apple, anyway. This is a way for someone to use HDMI in a way that Apple will actually support.

    I still don't get what you're trying to say with your first post. Were you trying to make a point? Ask a question?
     
  5. Tech198 thread starter macrumors G4

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    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #5
    more TB

    ok..... maybe not officially supported, but still works never the less.

    Not really a question, more about making a point,

    I can see HDMI on board would make it more supported, but since Thunderbolt port can use HDMI anyway, I don't really see the existence of HDMI, (from and end user perspective)..... On PC's yes. only because they never had TB in the past,

    On Mac,, No, because of Thunderbolt always existed to some degree.

    *shrugs*

    Its just the only difference I can see is the elimination of the adapter.
     
  6. vladzaharia macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    #6
    ... Being able to do it and actually having it supported is a completely different thing. It was only supported in the past because DVI and HDMI use the same protocols. Anything that supports DVI automatically will support HDMI, you just need to make the DVI pins correspond to the right pins in the HDMI port. If you were to call Apple and tell them that the HDMI connection between your Mac and the TV wasn't working they'd (politely) tell you to **** off, because it's not supported. Now, HDMI is an officially supported output for the Macbook Pro 15" Retina, so you can actually get support for it.

    It's more than an elimination of an adapter.
     
  7. theSeb macrumors 604

    theSeb

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Location:
    Poole, England
    #7
    Apple really wanted an officially certified HDMI 1.4 port, which you cannot have with an adaptor.

    The reason for it? We can only speculate.
     
  8. Stetrain macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    #8
    As far as I know having HDMI 1.4 support requires you to use the actual HDMI physical port.

    HDMI 1.4 supports 4K resolutions (3840x2160 and 4096 × 2160).
     

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