Mini Memory upgrade

ukspeedtraps

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 13, 2011
20
0
Please help..

I want to take the 4GB to 16gb in my mini but I have not got a clue which one to order from my supplier.

The problem I have is what voltage do I use. Its a late mini 2012 2.5 GHz Intel Core i5

8GB Module - DDR3L 1600MHz
Part Number: KTA-MB1600L/8G
Specs: DDR3L, 1600MHz, Non-ECC, CL11, Dual Rank, X8, 1.35V, Unbuffered, SODIMM, 204-pin

8GB Module - DDR3 1600MHz
Part Number: KTA-MB1600/8G
Specs: DDR3, 1600MHz, Non-ECC, CL11, X8, 1.5V, Unbuffered, SODIMM, 204-pin

thanks
 

scottsjack

macrumors 68000
Aug 25, 2010
1,963
266
Arizona
B&H lists the Crucial memory that I bought as 1.4v.

It's called "Crucial 16GB (2 x 8GB) 204-Pin SODIMM DDR3 PC3-12800 Memory Module Kit (Mac)"

B&H #CR16S12800MK
Mfr #CT2K8G3S160BM

It's working great in both my 2012 i7 mini and 2012 15' MBP i7.
 

willgreene99

macrumors regular
Dec 16, 2010
216
15
DFW
I really want to test out if I could put two 16GB modules in the current gen Mini and see if the OS would recognize all 32GB of memory.

Intel's ARK database says that the CPU can handle 32GB but not sure if the logic board is able to control that much.

Still, I would like to test it out if it hasn't already been proven.
 

willgreene99

macrumors regular
Dec 16, 2010
216
15
DFW
Where do you buy the 16 GB SO-DIMMs?
Ok, I got this information from a company that sells 16gb so-dimms.

The CPU can handle 32GB total, but only if you had 4 sockets.

A 16GB module is made of DRAM-chips with 8 Gigabit (1GByte) per chip.

The Intel chipsets have an architectural limitation allowing them to only use modules based on 4 Gigabit chips, therefore the largest module possible has 8 Gigabyte.

Future Intel processors will fix this issue.

Unfortunately, Intel cannot work with 8Gbit chips, no matter the form-factor of the module.

Some of Intel's newer CPU's will be able to accept them, but at this time it is not an option.
 

Barena

macrumors newbie
Jan 20, 2014
17
1
Just installed 16GB on my first Mini, but was wondering - what do you guys do with the memory the Mini came with? Should I sell it?
 

Donka

macrumors 68030
May 3, 2011
2,760
1,383
Scotland
You could sell it but you won't get a big return for 4GB. It may be worth keeping it just in case the new memory was to fail (unlikely) but at least you have something to keep you going.
Alternatively, if there is any chance of you switching to another mini, it could be good to keep the Ram so if you came to sell the mini, put your 4GB back in and sell it as stock and put the 16GB into the new mini. The difference in price between selling a mini second hand with 4Gb or 16GB wouldn't be enough to get back the difference you paid for the 16GB. Assuming the mini you were switching too can be upgraded.
 

SoCalReviews

macrumors 6502a
Dec 31, 2012
603
201
Just installed 16GB on my first Mini, but was wondering - what do you guys do with the memory the Mini came with? Should I sell it?
It's not worth much. If your Mini is still under the first year of Apple warranty or three year Apple Care you will want to keep the stock 4GB RAM just in case you need to remove your 16GB upgrade RAM and install the stock memory before you turn in your Mini for a possible future warranty repair.
 

SoCalReviews

macrumors 6502a
Dec 31, 2012
603
201
Please help..

I want to take the 4GB to 16gb in my mini but I have not got a clue which one to order from my supplier.

The problem I have is what voltage do I use. Its a late mini 2012 2.5 GHz Intel Core i5

8GB Module - DDR3L 1600MHz
Part Number: KTA-MB1600L/8G
Specs: DDR3L, 1600MHz, Non-ECC, CL11, Dual Rank, X8, 1.35V, Unbuffered, SODIMM, 204-pin

8GB Module - DDR3 1600MHz
Part Number: KTA-MB1600/8G
Specs: DDR3, 1600MHz, Non-ECC, CL11, X8, 1.5V, Unbuffered, SODIMM, 204-pin

thanks
The 2012 Mac Minis with the Intel i5 and i7 Ivy Bridge processors should be able to use either 1.35v or 1.5v SODIMMs. 1.5v memory capability is needed to improve reliability and backward compatibility for some computers with older chipsets or for matching the voltage when adding RAM to a computer that already has RAM with that particular voltage. 1.5v memory is usually less expensive due to higher production yields. 1.35v memory will use less power and should run slightly cooler than 1.5v which is preferred for laptops but less important for desktops such as the Mini.

Some brands such as Crucial list their SODIMMs as 1.35v/1.5v (listed as 1.4v on some sites) which appears to be dual voltage capability. When adding a dual channel memory kit (two matching memory sticks) to the Mac Mini... if given the choice between 1.35v and 1.5v SODIMMs with about the same purchase price, the exact same CL (latency) and specs I would probably go with the 1.35v.
 
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