Moisture question.......

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Price1975, Dec 16, 2013.

  1. Price1975 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    #1
    Hey guys, new to the site and i have a question in regards to liquid damage to devices.....I have an iPad Mini that has never been out of the otter box......it has never been washed, submerged, rained on, fallen victim to a spill, etc.....However, I do use the device in the bathroom while showering & getting ready for work or whatever.......Ive done this for quite some time now (and Ive used every other apple device I have ever owned for the same reason with zero issues whatsoever) Im guessing steam would fall under the category of 'liquid' and that is the ONLY exposure it has had to any elements......I guess my question is, are there certain types of liquid damage or different severities due to the type situation? ex. Dropping an iPad into a swimming pool or toilet as opposed to exposure to steam caused by a warm shower??? I hope that makes sense......and thanks in advance for any and all suggestions or solutions!

    -Price1975
     
  2. r0k macrumors 68040

    r0k

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit
    #2
    So what are you saying here? Are you saying your iPad stopped working and Apple says it was water damaged? Are you asking if there is a risk that it will stop working based on exposure to steam?

    Rule Number One: For handheld devices, with a very few exceptions that are clearly indicated on the package, water is bad.

    Rule Number Two: This includes water in all its forms whether it be sweat, steam, salt water, ice water, dog slobber or sea water. Basically keep your electronics the heck away from water. Are there varying levels of severity? Yes. There are 2. It still works and it is bricked. Please don't go experimenting trying to find out how much water it takes to brick your iPad. You might not get it repaired under warranty as water damage most often falls under the category of abuse (on your part: you should have kept it dry).

    If you think a device has gotten wet, put it in a bag of rice for 24 hours or more. Once you have patiently waited for the device to reach "normal" dryness, you can attempt to turn it back on. I would google around for specific times and possible treatments such as rice and other desiccants.

    Take your $25 bluetooth speaker in the shower and leave your $500 iPad in a dry place.
     
  3. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #3
    From what I understand, all the iDevices have a sensor in them that detects water damage. If this sensor is triggered, Apple will not cover it under warranty.

    I have a 1st gen iPad that I have relegated to SlingBox streamer and I use it in my bathroom and kitchen. I have been doing this for several months now and the moisture in the air (not direct contact with water) has not affected it.
     
  4. Tyler23 macrumors 603

    Tyler23

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    #4
    Steam is water vapor. Water vapor is heated water. When water vapor cools, it condenses into liquid water. Liquid water from steam = liquid water from pool. If steam gets into your device, it will cool and you will have water (even if only a minimal amount) in your device. Water and electronics do not go well together, and over time it is very possible it could damage your device (likewise, it may do no damage at all. Just depends).

    Either way, it's more than likely that consistent exposure to steam will trip the liquid detectors in your device. If you ever have an issue with it, whether it's caused by the water or not, Apple will not service your device if those sensors show that they've been exposed to water.

    As a precaution, I never take my devices into the bathroom when me when the shower is running. Best to be without music for a few minutes then to damage my device or prevent it from being serviced under warranty in the future.
     
  5. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #5
    Even humidity and rapid temperature change can cause condensation which can trigger the sensor.
     

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