More Space Display still Retina?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by krzkrzkrz, Jan 3, 2015.

  1. krzkrzkrz macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    #1
    System Preferences - Display - Scaled - More Space (Looks like 1920 x 1200)

    It also says: "Using a scaled resolution may affect performance". In what way? More resources as opposed to selecting the Best for Display option?

    Will battery life be affected? i.e. consume more?

    I actually prefer the More Space option since I have more real estate in terms of space availability. I am a web developer. I have more visibility in the code in my editor.

    Im also wondering. Is the More Space option still Retina?
     
  2. Freyqq macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    #2
    The way apple does scaling, double the pixels are rendered and then downscaled to fit the screen. So, best for retina is 1440x900 doubled to 2880x1800, which also happens to be the same amount of pixels on the 15" retina screen.

    1920x1200 is rendered at 3840x2400, which is more pixels than the screen. So it is downscaled to 2880x1800. The computer has to work harder bc it is rendering more pixels.

    Both are retina, just the computer has to render more pixels at higher scaled resolutions.

    I use the 1920x1200 retina res too, and it is fine.
     
  3. leman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #3
    When using a scaled resolution, the system needs to do more work (more pixels to draw), require more memory and also perform an extra rescaling step. This can obviously reduce performance (e.g. result in an perceived lag, stuttering etc.). It will also trivially affect battery life, as the GPU needs to do more work. However, so far I am not aware of anyone quantifying the difference. It is certainly negligible in most situations. So you should use the resolution you feel most comfortable with.

    As to your second question, isn't it just terminological? There is not fixed definition of 'retina display'. Generally, it means drawing on a ultra-high-res display while scaling the graphics so that the size of the images appear 'normal'. Or, put differently, its drawing to a high-res display as if it were a lower-res display with sub pixel precision. If you agree with that, then any mode you can select in display preferences are 'retina'.
     
  4. krzkrzkrz thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    #4
    Any significant differences on heat emissions? Does the laptop get significantly hotter? Or not noticeable difference?
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #5
    I've not noticed any issues, in going scaled and or native, though I almost always select best selection.
     
  6. leman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #6
    I thought you own one? Why don't you try it out yourself?
     
  7. krzkrzkrz thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    #7
    Yeap, temps seem fine. Except when streaming a video. i.e. on Youtube. Starts to get hot. But not too much
     
  8. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #8
    If you're using Flash based video instead of HTML5, that's normal.
     
  9. krzkrzkrz thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    #9
    I'm also wondering. I have the MBP Retina, without the dedicated graphics card.

    If I, however, owned the model with the dedicated GPU. Will scaling to a higher resolution make things smoother? Or by just a fraction?
     
  10. GP-SE macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    #10
    Dedicated GPU wont make a difference, it's only used for Games\Photoshop\Graphically Demanding Applications. The User Interface uses the iGPU, scaled res or not.
     
  11. acctman macrumors 65816

    acctman

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Location:
    Georgia
    #11
    this default display setting is the only retina setting... going up or down in resolution you lose retina. it even tells you or am i mistaken?
     
  12. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #12
    Retina is nothing but a marketing term. What it means is that at a normal viewing distance, you cannot distinguish individual pixels.

    Any resolution on a retina screen is, by that definition, retina.
     
  13. MrGimper macrumors 601

    MrGimper

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Location:
    Andover, UK
    #13
    Indeed. My 48" HD TV is retina too, by definition :D
     
  14. acctman macrumors 65816

    acctman

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Location:
    Georgia
    #14
    you can see a difference... when i switch from retina the text and images are a bit fuzzy/not a clear
     
  15. MrGimper macrumors 601

    MrGimper

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Location:
    Andover, UK
    #15
    Indeed they are, however you still cannot see the individual pixels so it's still retina by definition. The pixels in the screen can't change size.
     

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