Mount an external HD connected to PC to use as Time Machine Location?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Mugambo, Oct 1, 2009.

  1. Mugambo macrumors 6502

    Mugambo

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    #1
    The topic says it all.

    All I need to achieve is, use the external hard drive connected to my windows laptop as a destination for Time Machine backup for Macbook Pro location. This would be assuming that both the windows laptop and the Macbook Pro are connected to the same wifi network.

    Any help or advice appreciated.
    Thanks in Advance.
     
  2. padrino121 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2004
    #2
    Check out www.macosxhints.com and search for time machine unsupported volumes and you will find a number of howtos. I can tell you from personal experience it will work fine.
     
  3. Denarius macrumors 6502a

    Denarius

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Location:
    Gironde, France
    #3
    Just out of curiosity, have you had to restore from the backup in anger yet?
     
  4. TJones macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    #4
    The disk used for Time Machine has to be HFS + journaling so no, you can't use a share off of Windows.

    From Wikipedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Machine_(software)#Requirements

    Time Machine requires a non-booting hard-drive or partition to be connected to the computer or to a computer on the network, or to a network router such as an Apple AirPort Extreme, connected via a USB port and then configured to be shared with the computer running Time Machine (optional password protection may be used).[2] It can back up to internal hard-drives or partitions,[3] but it is recommended that you back up to an external hard drive connected by USB or FireWire the first time that you back up your Mac, for the speed of the backup will be much more steady and may be considerably faster than over a wireless connection. According to Apple, it can only be backed up to network drives if they are being hosted by another computer running Leopard (including Leopard Server).[4] Further, the volume needs to be formatted with the HFS Plus file system, with journaling enabled. If the hard drive uses a different file system type it will need to be reformatted before use, which will erase any existing data on the disk. It is possible, however, to back up to any file server supporting the Apple Filing Protocol by employing a HFS+ disk image on top of some other native filesystem (e.g. a Linux desktop server,[5] smaller NAS.[6] or FreeNAS [7])
     
  5. Denarius macrumors 6502a

    Denarius

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Location:
    Gironde, France
    #5
    This bit seems to indicate that chucking an HFS+J disk image on the drive, whatever format is feasible.
     

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