Mountain Lion 10.9

Discussion in 'macOS' started by BetsyMePoocho, Aug 13, 2015.

  1. BetsyMePoocho, Aug 13, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2015

    BetsyMePoocho macrumors member

    BetsyMePoocho

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Location:
    San Juanico Baja California Sur
    #1
    I did an up grade to Yosemite and my old Mac Book Pro isn't happy. It qualified for the upgrade, but wasn't happy with my meager 8g of mem. I then used Carbon Copy and reinstalled Lion 10.7.6 which is fine with my Mac Book.

    What I would really like to do is wipe my HD and do a clean install of Mountain Lion 10.8 which I have ordered from Apple.

    Question….. Is the 10.8 that I will receive from Apple via e-mail do a compete install from an external disk? In other words I'll download it to an external disk, use [opt] button during boot up, select my external disk and install clean from it…..??? Yes????

    I just want a clean install and I guess I'll wait for a new, stronger, faster, better, computer for Yosemite…

    Obsolescence…. How sweet it is.

    Some smart one give me a quick answer….

    Thanks Loads.

    I ment to say 10.8 not 10.9….. My Bad!!!
     
  2. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #2
    No it won't by default work like that. I believe Apple is going to email you a code you can use in the App Store to get the Mavericks installer. Once you have that downloaded, quit the installer if it launches. The installer file will be in your /Applicaitons folder.

    Then use an 8GB USB key (or your external drive if you want) with this app to make yourself a USB installer key.

    Once that is done you can option key boot to the installer and use Disk Utility to erase the drive and install the OS.
     
  3. BetsyMePoocho thread starter macrumors member

    BetsyMePoocho

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Location:
    San Juanico Baja California Sur
    #3
    Weaselboy,,, Great info and I'm on the 'hunt'…. Understand and I should be good.

    Thanks
     
  4. Taz Mangus macrumors 68040

    Taz Mangus

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    #4
    8GB should be more then enough to run Yosemite. I can understand if it was only 4GB why that might be an issue. What model of Mac are you trying to run with Yosemite?
     
  5. BetsyMePoocho thread starter macrumors member

    BetsyMePoocho

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Location:
    San Juanico Baja California Sur
    #5
    Taz,,,,

    My MBP is a 13" mid 2012 2.5GH Core i5. You are correct, Yosemite loaded, opened, functioned, but the MBP went from 32 second start-up using 10.7 to 2 minutes & 25 seconds with Yosemite. It also hogged most of my memory. I really liked to "look & feel", but sometimes the older machines are bumping the ceiling of their build.

    Or,,, maybe if I did a "clean" install Yosemite would behave better. I also have a mid 2007 iMac with 6 meg ram, so with these, how should I say,, older work horses I think that 10.8 will serve me well on both units.

    I've already upgraded the MBP from 10.7.5 to 10.8 and he is very happy. I'll soup-up the old iMac to 10.8 and the three of us will happily "rock'n roll" until I'm bumping my head on the ceiling of the upper limits.

    Then I'll reach deep into my pocket and get a new iMac, MBP, iPad, & iPod…..! Hey, it is the capitalistic thing to do and it supports China.

    I really do thank you for your input… really.

    I can only say that all of this is much better than all the years I spent with POS MicroSoft….!
     
  6. Taz Mangus macrumors 68040

    Taz Mangus

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    #6
    I had a 2009 17" MacBook Pro with 8GB of RAM and a 500GB 7200RPM hard drive. With Yosemite 10.10.4 installed it did not take 2 minutes for it to boot.

    Try this, create a new partition on your internal hard drive and clean install Yosemite to it. Then boot to the new partition, set it up but don't install anything other then the basic system. Play with it as is and see how it performs as a clean install. This should give you an idea what a clean install will do for you. When you are done, boot back to your primary install partition and delete the new partition. This way you only need to spend a little bit of time seeing if a clean install has any effect on your system performance. At that point you can decide what you want to do next.

    No argument from me about the Windows reference.
     

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