mounted .sparseimage file size is wrong, and I'm in big trouble

Discussion in 'macOS' started by macmanu, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. macmanu macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    #1
    Hello Folks

    My external HD crashed, with my complete iTunes library on it :eek:

    I needed CPR. Then I thought: no problems, I have my trusty backup.

    So I whipped out my other HD with a 30Go .sparseimage on it. I use CCC to do my incremental backups of my library, un-encrypted (i.e. I do not encrypt it).

    I mount it... and what do I get? The right files, except 300Mb instead of 30Gb!

    I looked everywhere, tried everything, and implored every deity, and I am still stumped. I tried to restore via Disk Utility, with the same result: a 300 Mb file...

    Help me save my life's listening pleasure and I will be your friend forever.

    Here's some info/weirdness that might help:
    - I'm on OS X 10.4 Tiger

    - I verified the disk image with Disk Utility - all OK

    - weird?: I copied the image (the whole 30Gb of it) on a fresh HD, and mounted it. The root folder on the mounted image resides in /private/temp/ccc_dmg_mount.e7h4Mt. Is that normal?

    - weird?: If I look at the image info (via apple-I or Disk Utility) it gives me a total capacity of 268 GB, which is the size of the HD it resides on! Is that normal?
     
  2. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #2
    "So I whipped out my other HD with a 30Go .sparseimage on it. I use CCC to do my incremental backups of my library, un-encrypted (i.e. I do not encrypt it)."

    What is a "sparseimage" and why were you messing with such things on a backup, anyway?

    Good luck.

    I think there's a lesson to be learned here. That lesson is:
    When doing backups, never NEVER "encrypt" or "compress" your data.
    Do not make an "image" out of it.
    Instead, just copy or dupe it in plain, simple, "finder format".
    Yes - that may take more space. BUT....
    ....it reduces problems trying to "get at that data" when you REALLY need to.

    One other thought. I'm probably one of the few longtime Mac users on this entire Earth who refuses to use iTunes to "store" my music. I prefer to keep my music in my own "library" (really, just it's own volume) that iTunes is never allowed to "touch". Just too many disasters with folks losing their music through some iTunes "glitch" or mishandling. iTunes, leave my music _alone_, thank you very much. Rant over.

    Final suggestions:
    #1 - Have you considered trying "Data Rescue 3" on the problem drive?
    #2 - When you begin to rebuild your music library, whatever else you do, do NOT use images, encryption, or any of that crap.
    #3 - I sense your music is (was?) important to you. In that case, buy at least TWO new hard drives: first as your primary music storage drive, and the second as a backup of the first.
     

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