Mounting a drive instantly crashes my Mac

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Loa, Nov 29, 2012.

  1. Loa macrumors 65816

    Loa

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    Québec
    #1
    Hello,

    I wanted to install Windows on a drive, and I used the BootCamp helper. Under Windows, in the list of drives, I couldn't find the drive I wanted to use, because Windows couldn't make sense of my Mac formatted drives and partitions and RAID slices and damned recovery partitions.

    So I rebooted on the Mac and used Tuxera plug-in (through Disk Utility) to format the drive using NTFS. As soon as the system tried to mount the drive, the entire system black-out and crashed. (It used to work perfectly under 10.6. Seems to be broken under 10.8.)

    Now I can't even plug the drive in (internal or external, esata or USB) without crashing the system. How the &$%@ can I reformat that drive?

    Loa
     
  2. seveej macrumors 6502a

    seveej

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #2
    OSX should be able to handle NTFS (at least read only), so I guess the NTFS volume is somehow ********* up.

    I have not used recent iterations of bootcamp, but if my memory serves, the setup assistant usually creates a FAT32 -partition, which is then (during win-installation) converted to NTFS if so selected.

    Anyway,

    First, I'd disable automount for that volume (if you can get the necessary data for the volume). See https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2568197?start=0&tstart=0

    Then you will probably be able to erase the volume using disk utility or other similar utilities.

    Alternatively you can try plugging that volume into a Wintel machine and see whether they are better able to handle it.

    HTH,
     
  3. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #3
    Boot from anything that won't mount it using Tuxera drivers:

    Any other computer
    Your Windows partition, if you have one
    Any boot disc with a drive utility, such as: OS X installation DVD, a Windows installation DVD, or a Linux Live disc

    Then blow away the bad partition.

    On a side note, I find it is best to remove all OS X-related drives when installing Windows. It reduces confusion and possibilities for bad things to happen to your existing drives. After installation is done, you can put all your other drives back in and everything works great.
     
  4. Loa thread starter macrumors 65816

    Loa

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    Québec
    #4
    Hello,

    Thanks for the tips guys. I booted up with a SL DVD and reformated the drive. Windows then installed with no issues.

    Turns out that Tuxera was the culprit: once it was uninstalled, the NTFS drive mounts normally on 10.8.

    Loa
     

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