Mouses or Mice - A question of English

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madamimadam

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While I've always said "Mice", I was recently thinking, isn't there some rule in the English language that says that a living item is treated differently from an object which would mean that the plural to the computer mouse is mouses?
 

MacNut

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Jan 4, 2002
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pl. also mouses ) Computing a small hand-held device that is dragged across a flat surface to move the cursor on a computer screen, typically having buttons that are pressed to control computer functions.
 

WildCowboy

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Both "mice" and "mouses" are acceptable when referring to the computer mouse, though "mice" is somewhat more prevalent.
 

iMeowbot

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Aug 30, 2003
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Don't worry about it, both "mice" and "mouses" are in common use.

Rules? What rules? When is the last time you saw two hice galloping down the road? Or grice taking flight?
 

bousozoku

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Jun 25, 2002
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The plural for mouse in Middle English was mousies and I choose to use that instead.

In any case, I think people will figure it out.
 

madamimadam

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To be honest, it is not about whether people understand or not, it is about being anal
:)
 

MrSmith

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Jaffa Cake said:
A few weeks ago I was told at great length the reasons why it's 'mouses' and not 'mice'. It wasn't really that interesting, to be honest. :p
Well, I'm all ears...

Jaffa Cake said:
it is about being anal
...but luckily only one of these.
 

kettle

macrumors 65816
madamimadam said:
To be honest, it is not about whether people understand or not, it is about being anal
:)
you're a star

Jaffa Cake said:
A few weeks ago I was told at great length the reasons why it's 'mouses' and not 'mice'. It wasn't really that interesting, to be honest. :p
so, mice are commonly used to control pointers on computer interfaces, and to see this happen you would observe a pointer as it mouses around the screen?


Just checking.
 

MrSmith

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Nov 27, 2003
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MalcolmJID said:
Dinner = Lunch (12pm/1pm)
Tea = Tea (5pm/6pm)
Dinner=Lunch
1=2
:confused:

When you visit a restaurant in the evening do you 'go out to tea'? :confused:

Oh, OK, got it:

From Wikipedia: "Tea" is not only the name of the beverage, but of a late afternoon light meal, irrespective of the beverage drank (especially in The North, where the evening meal usually referred to as "dinner" is called "tea", and "lunch" is "dinner"). Frequently (outside the UK) this is referred to as "high tea", however in the UK high tea is an evening meal. The term comes from the meal being eaten at the "high" (main) table, rather than the smaller table common in living rooms.
MalcolmJID said:
Yea, I spose Tea is nearly what most Americans would called dinner? :-\
I hope, Sir, you are not referring to me - a loyal subject of Her Majesty :mad: :D
 

madamimadam

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Jaffa Cake said:
Actually, yes. Except that it would be 'for' rather than 'to'. In fact, me and Miss Jaffa Cake are 'off out for tea' tomorrow. :)
How can you correct someone's grammar and then say "off out"?
 

Jaffa Cake

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Aug 1, 2004
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madamimadam said:
How can you correct someone's grammar and then say "off out"?
I'm not attempting to correct anyone's grammar, simply saying how we would phrase the statement in these parts. I'm fully aware that what I'm saying isn't grammatically correct, but colloquialisms, dialects and the like often aren't. :)
 

MrSmith

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Nov 27, 2003
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madamimadam said:
How can you correct someone's grammar and then say "off out"?
Are you north or south? Or a colonial butting in? :D:D Actually it's not a case of grammar. 'To' refers to a place, 'for' refers to the purpose. Either is OK but daan souf we would tend to use 'to'. BTW I'm interesting in my other life.

Jaffa Cake said:
Actually, yes. Except that it would be 'for' rather than 'to'. In fact, me and Miss Jaffa Cake are 'off out for tea' tomorrow.
How about going to a Dinner and Dance? Tea and Dance? And does your lady friend know you call her that? :(:D

Edit: missed Jaffa Cake's posting above, if it makes any difference.
 

madamimadam

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Jaffa Cake said:
I'm not attempting to correct anyone's grammar, simply saying how we would phrase the statement in these parts. I'm fully aware that what I'm saying isn't grammatically correct, but colloquialisms, dialects and the like often aren't. :)
You say "off out"???

I swear, the English speak their own language almost as badly as the people of the United States
 

Jaffa Cake

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MrSmith said:
How about going to a Dinner and Dance?
You asking? ;)

That's a good point, though. In this instance, 'a Dinner' could refer to an evening do, although in my mind at least you'd then be referring to the whole event as the dinner, not just the meal itself.

MrSmith said:
And does your lady friend know you call her that? :(:D
Oh yes. Actually, last night I told her we were off out to an evening do next month (one of those previously discussed 'Dinner Dance' things), and her first question was "Will we get any tea there?" :D
 
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