Moving an existing Leopard Installation to new machine

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Cue, Jul 13, 2009.

  1. Cue macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2005
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    #1
    Hello there,

    I just ordered a new MBP 13.3' and I'm trying to figure out what is the best way to move my existing Leopard installation (White Core Duo Macbook), along with all my files.

    Instead of migrating however, I want to swap my existing hard drive to the one of my new Macbook Pro since it's a 320Gb 7200rpm drive.

    Is this going to work if I just drop in my old hard drive to my new MBP?

    Thanks!
     
  2. kropotov macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2009
  3. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #3
    You can... but the drivers for the hardware won't be the same, so you may experience some issues

    I would do an Archive and Install once you swap

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  4. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #4
    if you INSIST on using your way then you should pop in the hard drive, then do a "reinstall and archive" on the new computer.. that will reinstall all the correct drivers and leave you files and settings :)

    or the better way would be to use time machine ;)
     
  5. Cue thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2005
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    #5
    I don't insist in any way :) I'm merely trying to find the best one :D

    So by using time machine it means that I should at least have a spare drive available. Am I right?

    I've been trying to find a support document by Apple, but didn't have the chance.

    Thanks for your input so far.
     
  6. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #6
    Swapping your drive should not be a problem at all, if you do the Archive and Install. Even if you use Time Machine, you will need to Archive and Install unless you use Migration Assistant.

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  7. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #7
    ahh ok excellent. was just making sure :p yes use time machine to back it up to an external, then restore from the time machine backup when installing on the new HD.

    provided its done with a time machine backup or an archive an install it will be fine, just putting the HD in wouldnt be very wise. it would still work but support might be limited. :)
     
  8. Cue thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2005
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    #8
    So let me get this right.

    1. Setup time machine on the old Macbook
    2. Perform a full backup of the drive.
    3. Move the drive to the new Macbook Pro
    4. Do erase and install
    5. During setup chose migrate using time machine
     
  9. tersono macrumors 68000

    tersono

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #9
    Provided your original Leopard installation is completely up to date and you have not hacked it around too much (i.e. removing drivers), then you should be able to boot the new machine from the old drive without issues. Software update installs drivers for new hardware with each new OS X update. OS X is specifically designed by Apple to permit this - the only transfer that doesn't work properly is moving from PPC to Intel or vice-versa - or, very occasionally, transferring to very newly-released hardware that may have shipped with an interim software update to include new drivers - the next available OS X update fixes this.

    I make my living from computer support (both Mac and Windows) and cloning or swapping a hard drive is the usual method of getting a new machine configured. Archive/install is rarely needed - the only thing you need to be aware of is that any software that requires activation (Adobe, RapidWeaver etc) needs to be de-activated on the old machine and then re-activated after the swap.

    Play safe and back up your data first.
     

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