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Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
Ok - any luck in migrating an intel-based parallels VM to ARM for the M1 processor? Parallels allows you to move the files, but as far as the programs - you're stuck. Who the hell has 10-year-old software to reinstall? Surprisingly, I don't see any search hits on it and I expected it to be a bigger issue.
 

Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
Thanks for answering. I erroneously assumed that if Parallels still sold the product - they'd handle the port - but on second thought, they really are different architectures and the software architected for intel might not even work on ARM. This isn't even my problem yet - it's my in-laws - but it will be mine in year or so - I'm hanging on to my 2015 MBP until they stop posting security updates. Not sure what they're going to do yet.
 

Lihp8270

macrumors 65816
Dec 31, 2016
1,099
1,557
Thanks for answering. I erroneously assumed that if Parallels still sold the product - they'd handle the port - but on second thought, they really are different architectures and the software architected for intel might not even work on ARM. This isn't even my problem yet - it's my in-laws - but it will be mine in year or so - I'm hanging on to my 2015 MBP until they stop posting security updates. Not sure what they're going to do yet.
Windows for arm has an emulation layer for x86 applications.

The bast majority should run fine unless they’re quite specialised.

It’s just the case of reinstalling the software.
 

Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
Windows for arm has an emulation layer for x86 applications.

The bast majority should run fine unless they’re quite specialised.

It’s just the case of reinstalling the software.
That's the problem - they (and I) have a lot of old software.
 

elvisimprsntr

macrumors 65816
Jul 17, 2013
1,022
1,525
Florida
[mention]Dr_Charles_Forbin [/mention]

Move to NAS hosted VMs.



1. Frees up client resources. (SSD, RAM, etc.)
2. Securely access via VPN from anywhere in the world and 35,000 feet in the air.
3. Client OS and processor independent.
4. Can access via mobile devices. (tablets, phones, etc.)
 

Lihp8270

macrumors 65816
Dec 31, 2016
1,099
1,557
That's the problem - they (and I) have a lot of old software.
Now may be the time to record your serial numbers and get hold of installers.

Because at the moment you have the privilege that this is all still working. There will come a time when the old system fails without backups of the software you need. At which point your hand will be forced.
 

Boyd01

Moderator
Staff member
Feb 21, 2012
7,598
4,477
New Jersey Pine Barrens
Couldn't you just use some Windows backup software in the old VM, create a new (empty) VM on the M1 Mac and then restore the backup of your software and user data? But I suppose this could be a problem if you are using something like a Windows 7 or XP VM on the old Mac.

I always made a point of saving the installers for all my Windows software.
 
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Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
[mention]Dr_Charles_Forbin [/mention]

Move to NAS hosted VMs.



1. Frees up client resources. (SSD, RAM, etc.)
2. Securely access via VPN from anywhere in the world and 35,000 feet in the air.
3. Client OS and processor independent.
4. Can access via mobile devices. (tablets, phones, etc.)
Good idea... probably too expensive unless they have single client licenses.
 

Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
Couldn't you just use some Windows backup software in the old VM, create a new (empty) VM on the M1 Mac and then restore the backup of your software and user data? But I suppose this could be a problem if you are using something like a Windows 7 or XP VM on the old Mac.

I always made a point of saving the installers for all my Windows software.
Part of the problem, in this case, is that it's not mine - it's my in-laws. I'll have the same problem at some point but I'm better able to deal with it. I offered to sell them my mac mini - 2014 but it still gets what they need done (TurboTax doesn't run on Catalina). They can just copy the whole machine over and be done with it for a couple of years. I'm looking to upgrade, but not yet. No software updates though.
 
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elvisimprsntr

macrumors 65816
Jul 17, 2013
1,022
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Florida
Good idea... probably too expensive unless they have single client licenses.

It’s all open source, so your only expense is repurposing an old x86_64 machine or buying a new/used one. You just need the can do attitude or find someone who has.

I repurposed several QNAP OEM NAS appliances for this exact purpose.
 
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Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
It’s all open source, so your only expense is repurposing an old x86_64 machine or buying a new/used one. You just need the can do attitude or find someone who has.

I repurposed several QNAP OEM NAS appliances for this exact purpose.
I'm liking that idea actually. I have an old ds220j that I've been considering upgrading anyway - I just use it for backups of all the machines in the house. In general, I wish Apple was more NAS friendly - I'd move my pictures and music over to the NAS and then mount it when I needed it where I needed it.
 

AppleTO

macrumors 6502a
Oct 31, 2018
884
2,211
Toronto, Canada
I ran into a roadblock pretty quickly when I tired to migrate my Intel bootcamp to my new M1.

Obviously I had to start from scratch because the OS needs to be a different architecture, but I hit the roadblock pretty quickly when I released my software requires a hardware license USB key that has no ARM driver.

You can't emulate drivers, and the manufacture had no plans to create an ARM driver, so, I couldn't open my software. That was the end of that test.
 
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Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
I ran into a roadblock pretty quickly when I tired to migrate my Intel bootcamp to my new M1.

Obviously I had to start from scratch because the OS needs to be a different architecture, but I hit the roadblock pretty quickly when I released my software requires a hardware license USB key that has no ARM driver.

You can't emulate drivers, and the manufacture had no plans to create an ARM driver, so, I couldn't open my software. That was the end of that test.
Thanks. So happy Apple went to ARM. Personally, I think Parallels should warn you about that before you buy the software, and Apple should give you a heads up too. My b-i-l is contemplating buying the 2017 intel mini, but I'm kind of trying to dissuade him from it - he can do what he wants, but he'll have to eat a 15% restock fee plus pay $1500 for basically 2017 hardware, which is not where Mac is going. I've offered to sell him my mini - which I wasn't ready to get rid of yet - but it'll last him another few years at 1/4 the price. No software updates, though, so he's stuck at Monterey.
 

HobeSoundDarryl

macrumors G5
Here's a crazy idea: spend only a few hundred for a Mac Mini-like PC for "old fashioned" bootcamp and 100% compatibility with all Windows software. Paralells is leaning on Windows for ARM which is notorious for not being fully compatible with Windows for Intel. Parallels is also- basically- an annual subscription- you almost have to upgrade each year- and it will only take a few rounds of that to start getting into the low end of pretty good Mini PCs. Add a few hundred to buy a great Mini PC now and essentially have full "bootcamp" in its own box. Brands like Minisforum have some impressive, true PCs in small boxes and they are not the only players in this space.

Silicon basically dooms traditional bootcamp broad compatibility. I don't see that changing for a very long time. Windows ARM is not full Windows. So it seems the best solution for those who need Windows is to return to having a second computer- a dedicated PC. If demands are light, there are cheap Windows laptops able to run most software. If demands are a little heavier, it is very impressive how much power one can get in a Mini PC in a Mac-Mini-like box. Do a little research and see for yourself.

Anticipating this kind of need (for bootcamp compatibility) but wanting to embrace Silicon, I chose a 5K2K ultra wide monitor with more than one computer video input. So now, Mac Studio can rule the monitor most of the time, PC can use it when I need PC apps and I can even split screen to have BOTH Mac and PC running side by side together.

Apple basically took away a very useful (for some) benefit by embracing Silicon. It's OK to replace that benefit the way we did it BEFORE there was a bootcamp option. And there's some great tech out there priced very competitively. If you are only accustomed to Apple pricing, it may be shocking to see how much "whole" computers can cost just over the wall.
 
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Fowl

macrumors regular
Sep 28, 2018
129
118
Is it somehow possible to run Windows on a stick PC plugged into the mac, using some kind of a remote client?
 

Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
Doesn’t matter - it’s a different architecture. He’s happy with powering up his old one if he needs it - which is fine with me.
 

robbietop

Suspended
Jun 7, 2017
876
1,168
Good Ol' US of A
You cannot do that. You will have to migrate personal files, etc to a folder on the Macintosh or an external disk and then move them onto the new Parallels VM.
You will also have to purchase a new Windows License, as you will be installing a whole new Windows OS (Windows 11 only now for Parallels VM).

I had to do this when I got my MacBook Pro M1. It's not negotiable.
 
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bobcomer

macrumors 601
May 18, 2015
4,949
3,690
Is it somehow possible to run Windows on a stick PC plugged into the mac, using some kind of a remote client?
Not yet, nobody has built on, but it is doable. The hard part is the drivers running on the Mac.
 

Dr_Charles_Forbin

macrumors 6502
Original poster
May 11, 2016
402
169
You cannot do that. You will have to migrate personal files, etc to a folder on the Macintosh or an external disk and then move them onto the new Parallels VM.
You will also have to purchase a new Windows License, as you will be installing a whole new Windows OS (Windows 11 only now for Parallels VM).

I had to do this when I got my MacBook Pro M1. It's not negotiable.
I’ll be honest with you - I’m starting to like the idea of it running on a Synology NAS. That way it’s completely out of Apple’s and Parallel’s clutches.
 

Yebubbleman

macrumors 603
May 20, 2010
5,686
2,238
Los Angeles, CA
Ok - any luck in migrating an intel-based parallels VM to ARM for the M1 processor? Parallels allows you to move the files, but as far as the programs - you're stuck. Who the hell has 10-year-old software to reinstall? Surprisingly, I don't see any search hits on it and I expected it to be a bigger issue.
You might be able to run your Intel/x86/x86-64 apps on your Windows 10/11 for ARM64 VM, but you can't move a whole x86/x86-64 Parallels VM over to an Apple Silicon version of Parallels.
 
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