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choreo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 10, 2008
891
340
Midland, TX
This shows just how ignorant I am! I have a Sonnet PCI card in my 7,1 which contains (4) 1TB Samsung NVMe modules configured as Raid O using Apple Disk Utility.

If I remove that card and plug it into another 7,1 what happens to the data? Is the Raid 0 configuration lost in the transfer?
 
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OkiRun

macrumors 65816
Oct 25, 2019
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This shows just how ignorant I am! I have a Sonnet PCI card in my 7,1 which contains (4) 1TB Samsung NVMe modules configured as Raid O using Apple Disk Utility.

If I remove that card and plug it into another 7,1 what happens to the data? Is the Raid 0 configuration lost in the transfer?
Off topic ~
If you are having a new 7,1 delivered, I'd recommend just turning it on, setting preferences and using it for 48 hours for email, web browsing, natively installed software/apps - prior to adding anything (apps, internal or external hardware) just to make sure the computer cpu and gpu and ram and sleep are working flawlessly.
 
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MacUser2525

Suspended
Mar 17, 2007
2,097
377
Canada
This shows just how ignorant I am! I have a Sonnet PCI card in my 7,1 which contains (4) 1TB Samsung NVMe modules configured as Raid O using Apple Disk Utility.

If I remove that card and plug it into another 7,1 what happens to the data? Is the Raid 0 configuration lost in the transfer?

No it is still there to be used by the other machine, you have to use the DU to break the RAID up before it would not work as a RAID again in macOS. Should be able to plug it into a 5,1 and have it used if it has an OS on it that will support the version of DU used to make the RAID. That may not even matter, I know it does if you want to make changes, you need a version that is the same or newer to make them.
 
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choreo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 10, 2008
891
340
Midland, TX
No it is still there to be used by the other machine, you have to use the DU to break the RAID up before it would not work as a RAID again in macOS. Should be able to plug it into a 5,1 and have it used if it has an OS on it that will support the version of DU used to make the RAID. That may not even matter, I know it does if you want to make changes, you need a version that is the same or newer to make them.
So when you configure a software Raid 0 with Disk Utility, it writes something to the PCI card to remember the configuration and needs no files from the former boot drive to make it work?
 

MacUser2525

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Mar 17, 2007
2,097
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Canada
So when you configure a software Raid 0 with Disk Utility, it writes something to the PCI card to remember the configuration and needs no files from the former boot drive to make it work?

No it is the partitioning scheme used by a RAID volume, it is on the drive itself. So the OS know this is a RAID drive and treat it as such and it is a member of this RAID_ID if my memory serves me from when I used to use one for my boot disk. If you are booting off the RAID it will still be bootable. I forget when it was I created mine but I went through more than a few upgrades of OS and it just continued to work. Changed the machine a time or two and it still worked. I finally gave up when I went to Mojave and had no real hope of getting upgrades with it on a RAID so then I went with NVMe drive to get better speeds.
 
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joevt

Contributor
Jun 21, 2012
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So when you configure a software Raid 0 with Disk Utility, it writes something to the PCI card to remember the configuration and needs no files from the former boot drive to make it work?
With Disk Utility.app (and most other software raid solutions), the raid info is stored on each of the NVMe blades in the partitions that comprise the RAID. That means you can rearrange the NVMe blades on the PCIe card or move them to different M.2 slots (on different PCIe card(s), or Thunderbolt drives, or USB drives, etc.) and the raid would still work as long as all NVMe drives are connected to the macOS.
 
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