Moving from iMac to Mac Mini

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by Benjamin99, Jun 26, 2015.

  1. Benjamin99, Jun 26, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2015

    Benjamin99 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Location:
    The Woodlands, TX
    #1
    I currently have a mid 2011 iMac with the quad core 2.5GHz i5. It has been upgraded with 16GB of ram and a 128GB SSD to the 500GB HDD to make a fusion drive. It runs pretty well. I mainly use it for some hobby app development (Unity 5) and mild Photoshop usage, as well as ripping blu rays, and a Plex media server. I have currently ordered an LG 34um95-P monitor (mainly so I can switch between my surface pro for work and my mac mini without kvm switches and multiple monitors, cables, etc), and plan on replacing the iMac with a new Mac Mini - mid range with upgraded 16gb ram and 1TB HDD (can add SSD later it sounds like?). I am trying to decide if I am stepping down by moving to the mini? Moving from a quad core to dual core - will this affect performance with my current usage? I have been researching and from what I am seeing, it sounds like a step backwards for my usage, but would like to hear from people here that are more experienced with the mini.

    I guess a couple other options would be to locate a used 2012 quad core mini and upgrade the ram and install SSD, or even perhaps build a separate headless ripping/plex server rig on the cheap...

    Thanks!
     
  2. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    #2
    You should be fine as far as app development and mild photoshop usage, I was doing the same thing on a base 2012 Mac mini (stock) and didn't have any problems. Your upgraded RAM and HDD will be a huge help. I can't speak for the ripping Blu Ray video or Plex media server, though, I've not tried to do those things on the base model Mac mini.
     
  3. axiomatic macrumors newbie

    axiomatic

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2015
    #3
    In my humble opinion, the mini sucks. My brother had one and the thing was slow as hell. Go into an Apple store and test it alongside any other computer, it's honestly a hell of a lot slower
     
  4. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    #4
    Your brother likely had one with one or more bad components. I had my Mac mini, base 2012 model, and used it as my daily driver for a year. I'm still impressed with this machine.. and still wonder why Apple labels it "entry-level" when it performs well above the expectations of an entry-level machine. Keep in mind that I spent 13 years on Linux and spent the latter half of that time building my own computers. One of the reasons I moved to OS X from Linux is that the Mac mini "just works" without a lot of maintenance on my part. I'm also planning to buy another Mac mini for use as a media server.
     
  5. Dark Void macrumors 68030

    Dark Void

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Cimmerian End
    #5
    Usually, and this is going just by what I've seen here, most that claim the Mac mini is "entry-level" have a system that they aren't fully utilizing in the first place - where a mini would preform just as well.

    The Mac minis are great.
     
  6. Benjamin99 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Location:
    The Woodlands, TX
    #6
    So I guess my main question I guess is more regarding the mid level 2014 Mac Mini (2.5GHz dual core, 8GB ram) and whether that would suit my needs coming from the iMac, or maybe I should try and locate a 2012 (quad core) and do some upgrades to it?
     
  7. Dark Void macrumors 68030

    Dark Void

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Cimmerian End
    #7
    I'd definitely recommend getting a quad 2012 if you can get your hands on one. You'd have to upgrade that middle-of-the-line mini model that you mention anyway out of the gate if you want it to be on par with your iMac because it lacks a SSD, unless you do a BTO configuration.

    It would be cheaper to get a quad 2012, and the performance would be better as well, assuming you can utilize the cores.
     

Share This Page