Moving XP Pro OEM

orangezorki

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Aug 30, 2006
618
17
Hi,

I built a cheap PC earlier this year, and bought an OEM copy of XPpro to run on it. Now I have seen the error of my ways and bought a 24" iMac, and would like to use BootCamp for the odd game etc. The problem is, I know that to download updates (which we all know are vital for XP), you do need to use the genuine advantage application, ironically something which puts you at a great disadvantage.

So, my question is, can I just install it straight on BootCamp, and then in a week or so when everything is working fine, remove it from the PC. I'll install Ubuntu or something on that, just as a backup. So, I have no intention of defrauding Microsoft out of an XP license, but are their anti-piracy measures going to do what they always seem to do - i.e. screw the honest consumer?

Thanks for any help,

David
 

SMM

macrumors 65816
Sep 22, 2006
1,340
0
Tiger Mountain - WA State
I have had difficulties transferring OEM XP from one computer to another. If you can actually accomplish it, I will be surprised. It has never seemed right to me that if you pay to use SW, you cannot move it to any computer you wish. There is no attempt to defraud the company.
 

John Inman

macrumors newbie
Sep 7, 2006
22
0
Moving Windows XP to another computer

It is not a problem to move XP. When you install it on another computer it will ask you to activate windows, you'll have 30 days to do it. Call the 800 number that will be provided to you in the activation process and a customer service rep from Microsoft will help you. They will ask you if you have the software installed on any other computers, if not they will give you a new activation number.

That's all there is to it!

Hope this helps.

PS: Windows XP on the Mac Pro is awesome! The best windows machine I have ever had!
 

Gordy

macrumors 6502a
May 22, 2005
663
0
Bristol, UK
You cannot transfer window oem software to a new computer its one of the restrictions.

Technically changing the motherboard will also require you to get a new copy, but begging them usually does the trick.

/And now you know why they make so much money....
 

daveporter

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2006
212
0
Green Cove Springs, FL
Gordy said:
You cannot transfer window oem software to a new computer its one of the restrictions.

Technically changing the motherboard will also require you to get a new copy, but begging them usually does the trick.

/And now you know why they make so much money....
I have moved OEM copies of Windows XP OEM from one machine to another and never had any problem doing so. In fact, I have not even had it refuse to activate on-line and force me to call in.

What some of you may have had trouble with in the past is trying to install a vendor dedicated OEM disk (one provided with a Dell, Gateway, etc. computer) since these copies are often set so that you can only install that copy of Windows XP OEM on that one machine. The OEM version that you purchase from the computer shows and other software vendors with a hardware purchase (like a hard drive, motherboard, etc.) "usually" do not exhibit that problem.

I would say give it a try since you have nothing to loose but an hour to install it.

Dave
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,075
963
New England
daveporter said:
these copies are often set so that you can only install that copy of Windows XP OEM on that one machine.
All licenses of XP OEM are licensed for use with only one computer and transfer rights are explicitly not granted in the license. Read you EULAs.

It's very simple. If you want these additional rights, buy the retail (full packaged product) license. ($199 instead of $85 for XP Home.) The extra cost is for the extra rights and the support direct from Microsoft...

It's entirely up to MS whether they will bypass their license and give you rights beyond those originally granted in the EULA. (Such as in the case of a motherboard replacement, etc...) As such it is definitely worth a call to MS after you install it on the new machine, just explain the situation and they will most likely grant you an exception... [If it doesn't activate online...]

B
 

daveporter

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2006
212
0
Green Cove Springs, FL
balamw said:
All licenses of XP OEM are licensed for use with only one computer and transfer rights are explicitly not granted in the license. Read you EULAs.

It's very simple. If you want these additional rights, buy the retail (full packaged product) license. ($199 instead of $85 for XP Home.) The extra cost is for the extra rights and the support direct from Microsoft...

It's entirely up to MS whether they will bypass their license and give you rights beyond those originally granted in the EULA. (Such as in the case of a motherboard replacement, etc...) As such it is definitely worth a call to MS after you install it on the new machine, just explain the situation and they will most likely grant you an exception... [If it doesn't activate online...]

B

You are missing the point. I agree that one is only allowed to install WindowsXP OEM on ONE COMPUTER at a time. However, when you purchase an OEM copy of WinXP OEM WITH a hardware component you are allowed to install that copy on the computer where you also install the hardware. Microsoft, or anyone else, do not know what computer you installed the hard drive on, therefore, if you instal the hard drive on your Mac Pro (assuming it is a SATA drive) you have not violated anything. As I said, I did exactly that; moved a SATA drive to my Mac Pro and then loaded the WinXP that I purchased with the drive and previously used on a PC on my Mac Pro. It authorized on-line with no problems. Also, in my experience this has always been my experience. I change out my music recording machines about once every year and ALWAYS move the hardware/WinXP OEM to the new machine with no problems.

However, there are versions of OEM WinXP that were customized by some computer manufacturers so that it will not allow you to authorize on anything but the machine that it was installed on originally. This is because it is not a "non-targeted" OEM version (one that is sold by smaller custom computer builders and parts supply houses like NewEgg where they sell WinXP OEM to one person with a whole computer, to the next customer with just a hard drive, to the next with a mother board, etc.). That is why I ALWAYS purchase a hard drive when I purchase an OEM copy of WinXP, that way i can always move both the hardware and the WinXP OEM copy inaccordance with the EULA.

Dave
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,075
963
New England
daveporter said:
You are missing the point. I agree that one is only allowed to install WindowsXP OEM on ONE COMPUTER at a time.
No you are missing the point.

OEM licenses are for one computer ever. Not at a time. How that computer is defined is up to Microsoft to define, and they have a complicated hashing algorithm to determine if you simply upgraded a major component of the original computer before it asks you to activate again. Again it is up to Microsoft to determine that your use is OK.

Currently OEM license distribution falls under the Microsoft System Builder License. Unlike previous OEM licenses, this does not require that you purchase it along with hardware, which is why places like newegg no longer bundle a power cord or HDD power splitter with OEM licenses.

Please find the EULA.TXT file on your particular copy of XP OEM and post it as an attachment and show me where the rights you think you have are spelled out. In particular show me where it says that the product is licensed for one computer at a time.

B
 

John Inman

macrumors newbie
Sep 7, 2006
22
0
Windows Xp Oem Version

BALAMW, YOU ARE TOTALLY WRONG!

IF WHAT YOU ARE SAYING WAS TRUE MICROSOFT WOULD HAVE TO CODE EACH OEM PACKAGE TO EVERY PC MOTHERBOARD AND MAKE SURE THAT THE CORRECT ONE IS SOLD W/ ITS' SPECIFIC MOTHERBOARD.

OEM ONLY MEANS THAT IT DOES NOT INCLUDE THE RETAIL PACKAGING AND A THICK MANUAL.

THE RE-INSTALLABLE OS DISKS THAT COME WITH A DELL, HP, ETC. ARE NOT INSTALLABLE IN ANY OTHER MACHINE THAN THE BRAND YOU BOUGHT IT WITH. IT WILL HOWEVER, INSTALL ON ANOTHER DELL, HP, ETC.

I HAVE BEEN A SYSTEMS INTEGRATOR FOR WINDOWS BASED PCS SINCE THE EARLY 90S AND I KNOW WHAT I'M TALKING ABOUT! THE ONLY REASON I AM ON THIS FORUM IS BECAUSE APPLE FINALLY SAW THE LIGHT AND BUILT A SUPERIOR PIECE OF HARDWARE TO RUN WINDOWS ON.:cool:
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,075
963
New England
John Inman said:
BALEM W, YOU ARE TOTALLY WRONG!
I've read my EULAs have you?

This is what The XP retail EULA says:
13. SOFTWARE TRANSFER. Internal. You may move the Software to a different Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you must completely remove the Software from the former Workstation Computer. Transfer to Third Party. The initial user of the Software may make a one-time permanent transfer of this EULA and Software to another end user, provided the initial user retains no copies of the Software. This transfer must include all of the Software (including all component parts, the media and printed materials, any upgrades, this EULA, and, if applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity). The transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer, the end user receiving the Software must agree to all the EULA terms.
My Dell OEM license says:
Transfer. THIS LICENSE MAY NOT BE SHARED, TRANSFERRED TO OR USED CONCURRENTLY ON DIFFERENT COMPUTERS. The SOFTWARE is licensed with the HARDWARE as a single integrated product and may only be used with the HARDWARE. If the SOFTWARE is not accompanied by new HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE. You may permanently transfer all of your rights under this EULA only as part of a permanent sale or transfer of the HARDWARE, provided you retain no copies, if you transfer all of the SOFTWARE (including all component parts, the media and printed materials, any upgrades, this EULA and the Certificate of Authenticity), and the recipient agrees to the terms of this EULA. If the SOFTWARE is an upgrade, any transfer must also include all prior versions of the SOFTWARE.
What does your Windows XP EULA say? Could someone please post EULA.TXT from a generic XP OEM install CD. (It doesn't seem to be available online).

The SBL (as linked above) definitely restricts the redistribution rights to being part of a whole hardware package including the license and COA.

FWIW You say you know what you are talking about, yet you must not have bought/seen XP retail recently. There is no manual. Only a thin leaflet and a folder. As per the link above activation is what ties any install of XP to the hardware it is installed in. Many major OEMs (e.g. Dell) pre-acivate their install CDs and limit their installation to other Dells, but that doesn't mean anything in this context.

B
 

SMM

macrumors 65816
Sep 22, 2006
1,340
0
Tiger Mountain - WA State
balamw said:
I've read my EULAs have you?

This is what The XP retail EULA says:


My Dell OEM license says:


What does your Windows XP EULA say? Could someone please post EULA.TXT from a generic XP OEM install CD. (It doesn't seem to be available online).

The SBL (as linked above) definitely restricts the redistribution rights to being part of a whole hardware package including the license and COA.

FWIW You say you know what you are talking about, yet you must not have bought/seen XP retail recently. There is no manual. Only a thin leaflet and a folder. As per the link above activation is what ties any install of XP to the hardware it is installed in. Many major OEMs (e.g. Dell) pre-acivate their install CDs and limit their installation to other Dells, but that doesn't mean anything in this context.

B
You are absolutely correct. This is exactly what I discovered with our Dells. I was shocked, and this may be why some others are disagreeing. MS only releases a new OS every few years. So, how can they make money if you move the OS from an old machine to a new one? They cannot. So, they changed tactics, knowing that Dell will die in 3-4 years and you can never use their OS any longer.

This is what we get by allowing a monopoly to destroy the competition - predatory extortion. MS, and their lackey Dell, are really sticking it to people and they do not even know it - like some of these people just learning this stuff.
 

daveporter

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2006
212
0
Green Cove Springs, FL
SMM said:
You are absolutely correct. This is exactly what I discovered with our Dells. I was shocked, and this may be why some others are disagreeing. MS only releases a new OS every few years. So, how can they make money if you move the OS from an old machine to a new one? They cannot. So, they changed tactics, knowing that Dell will die in 3-4 years and you can never use their OS any longer.

This is what we get by allowing a monopoly to destroy the competition - predatory extortion. MS, and their lackey Dell, are really sticking it to people and they do not even know it - like some of these people just learning this stuff.
Believe what you want, there are two types of OEM packages, those dedicated to the COMPUTER they were purchased with, and, those that were purchased with a specific piece of hardware. As long as the hardware goes with the license your not changing the intent of the original sale. When you purchase a Dell, Acer, etc. computer, your copy of WinXP OEM is dedicated to that machine. When you buy the OEM package without a dedicated computer things are different.

I am telling your that my non-specific copies (several) have NEVER failed to re-authorize over the net when moved from computer to computer and I ALWAYS move the specific piece of equipment that was used to legally make the purchase to the new machine where the OEM copy will be installed.

So, we have a difference of opinion on this matter and I guess we will just have to agree to disagree.

To be honest, dealing with Microsoft was the main reason that I recently purchased my first Mac in 11 years. Prior to 1995 I was a Mac user, however, when AutoDesk discontinued AutoCAD for the Mac I was forced to move to PCs. When I purchased the Mac Pro it was with the intent of moveing to the Mac for everything but AutoCAD and running BootCamp/Windows XP just for AutoCAD use which I initially did.

Now, after three weeks of running that way, I have decided to wipe the Windows partition off my Mac. Having to restart to use AutoCAD just won't cut it. For the time being I will run AutoCAD on another machine when I need to and keep my Mac pure. If and when ParallelDesktop runs relatively bug free with AutoCAD concurrently with OSX then I will give that a try. So, I guess for now, the point about moving around WindowsXP OEM is moot.

Dave
 

daveporter

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2006
212
0
Green Cove Springs, FL
balamw said:
I've read my EULAs have you?

This is what The XP retail EULA says:


My Dell OEM license says:


What does your Windows XP EULA say? Could someone please post EULA.TXT from a generic XP OEM install CD. (It doesn't seem to be available online).

The SBL (as linked above) definitely restricts the redistribution rights to being part of a whole hardware package including the license and COA.

FWIW You say you know what you are talking about, yet you must not have bought/seen XP retail recently. There is no manual. Only a thin leaflet and a folder. As per the link above activation is what ties any install of XP to the hardware it is installed in. Many major OEMs (e.g. Dell) pre-acivate their install CDs and limit their installation to other Dells, but that doesn't mean anything in this context.

B
The text your quote from both documents make my point exactly.

One needs to move the "hardware" purchased with the OEM copy as well as the software. If you purchase a mouse, hard drive, etc. when you purchase the OEM copy you need to move that with it when you install on the new computer.

I know its weird, however, that is Microsoft.

Dave
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,075
963
New England
daveporter said:
So, we have a difference of opinion on this matter and I guess we will just have to agree to disagree.
We will have to agree to disagree.

I see nothing in the SBL that allows for transfer of a license with a specific piece of hardware, although I do read it that you are entitled to install a new OEM copy of the software when you purchase a non-peripheral piece of hardware. The idea behind that is that you can install a new OEM XP on a machine that had 98 on it when you replace the mobo or HDD.

Will someone please post the EULA.TXT from a generic OEM CD of XP so we can put this to bed?

EDIT: I draw my comments in part from articles such as this on microsoft.com http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/chats/trans/sysbuild/05_0222_sb.mspx

JD - Microsoft (Expert):
Q: Am I wrong or is there different wordage for the different types of license 's with say XP OS and MS Office,Then why does it say that that u can install OS on up to 2 systems for personal use in the License agreement?
A: Each and every product we publish has its own EULA. Even different version of the same product may have different EULAs (for example, XP Pro SP1 and XP Pro SP2 are different; XP Pro OEM and XP Pro Retail also have different EULAs). The XP Pro OEM EULA states clearly that the product can only be installed on a single system and that it cannot be transfered off that system onto another system.
This is the answer from Microsoft. They do not intend for OEM to be transferable. If they allow it to happen through the automated activation system for you or anyone else, count your lucky stars 'cause that's not a right they have granted you in the EULA and they don't have to let you do it.

Please post something that backs up your assertions.

B
 

daveporter

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2006
212
0
Green Cove Springs, FL
balamw said:
We will have to agree to disagree.

I see nothing in the SBL that allows for transfer of a license with a specific piece of hardware, although I do read it that you are entitled to install a new OEM copy of the software when you purchase a non-peripheral piece of hardware. The idea behind that is that you can install a new OEM XP on a machine that had 98 on it when you replace the mobo or HDD.

Will someone please post the EULA.TXT from a generic OEM CD of XP so we can put this to bed?

EDIT: I draw my comments in part from articles such as this on microsoft.com http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/chats/trans/sysbuild/05_0222_sb.mspx



This is the answer from Microsoft. They do not intend for OEM to be transferable. If they allow it to happen through the automated activation system for you or anyone else, count your lucky stars 'cause that's not a right they have granted you in the EULA and they don't have to let you do it.

Please post something that backs up your assertions.

B
This has gone on far longer then needed already. I don't believe that the call center guys are lawyers (it is debatable as to wheather there technicians also). Go to your next computer show, or visit a local computer shop that is a Microsoft partner, and ask them about purchasing an OEM copy with just a hard drive or even just a mouse. Even the large on-line companies see it that way (check out NewEgg for instance). If your position was correct, how could OEM be sold that way? What "system" would that copy then belong to? In fact, the hard disk drive can move to many such "systems" over its lifetime. If Microsoft only truly wanted the OEM version to stay put on one "system" then it would only be purchased with a complete computer system. In fact, when you purchase a complete system, the OEM copy DOES NOT ALLOW YOU TO MOVE IT, THESE ARE THE COPIES THAT WILL NOT RE-AUTHORIZE VIA THE NET WHEN YOU MOVE IT.

Again, we will have to agree to disagree on this since I'm not going to put any more effort into this sparing on an issue that ranks very low on my hit list of important issues. Belive what you will.

Dave
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,075
963
New England
daveporter said:
This has gone on far longer then needed already. I don't believe that the call center guys are lawyers (it is debatable as to wheather there technicians also). Go to your next computer show, or visit a local computer shop that is a Microsoft partner, and ask them about purchasing an OEM copy with just a hard drive or even just a mouse. Even the large on-line companies see it that way (check out NewEgg for instance). If your position was correct, how could OEM be sold that way? What "system" would that copy then belong to? In fact, the hard disk drive can move to many such "systems" over its lifetime. If Microsoft only truly wanted the OEM version to stay put on one "system" then it would only be purchased with a complete computer system. In fact, when you purchase a complete system, the OEM copy DOES NOT ALLOW YOU TO MOVE IT, THESE ARE THE COPIES THAT WILL NOT RE-AUTHORIZE VIA THE NET WHEN YOU MOVE IT.

Again, we will have to agree to disagree on this since I'm not going to put any more effort into this sparing on an issue that ranks very low on my hit list of important issues. Belive what you will.

Dave
Again, here is what Microsoft has to say about their recent changes to the SBL which governs the sale of OEM licenses. http://blogs.msdn.com/mssmallbiz/archive/2005/09/07/461950.aspx. Note that NewEgg no longer requires a hardware purchase with the purchase of an OEM license, they used to "suggest" a bundle. Now I believe they are explointing a new part of the SBL which allows for resale of unopened OEM licenses to other system builders. (See the SBL for further explanation).

Using the fact that computer shows (of all places) are doing something doesn't make it right, legal, or even ethical. I've seen plenty of grey market stuff at shows, including academic software and stuff that was made for consumption elsewhere and never officially imported in to the US.

Please point me to something from Microsoft that says anything other than:

* Software as a Component of the Computer - Transfer. THIS
LICENSE MAY NOT BE SHARED, TRANSFERRED TO OR USED CONCURRENTLY ON DIFFERENT COMPUTERS. The SOFTWARE is licensed with the COMPUTER as a single integrated product and may only be used with the COMPUTER. If
the SOFTWARE is not accompanied by HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE. You may permanently transfer all of your rights under this EULA only as part of a permanent sale or transfer of the COMPUTER, provided you retain no copies, if you transfer the SOFTWARE (including all component parts, the media, any upgrades, this EULA and the Certificate of Authenticity), and the recipient agrees to the terms of this EULA. If the SOFTWARE is an upgrade, any transfer must also include all prior versions of the SOFTWARE.
The term "COMPUTER" as used herein shall mean the HARDWARE, if
the HARDWARE is a single computer system, or shall mean the
computer system with which the HARDWARE operates, if the
HARDWARE is a computer system component.
Pulled from the EULA of a generic XP SP1, my IT department let me borrow. It's probably different for generic SP2, though the difference from the SP2 license supplied to me by Dell are slight, a few commas and a couple of words that don't have anything to do with this issue.

The HARDWARE gives you the right to acquire the OEM license, while the license itself becomes tied to the COMPUTER, which includes HARDWARE. Reading the EULA literally implies that if you buy the OEM license with a HDD and then replace and remove the HDD you are no longer entitled to its use.

If the SOFTWARE is not accompanied by HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE.
This does not say: If the software is accompanied by the HARDWARE you are entiltled to use the SOFTWARE.

Neither of us are attorneys, though I spend a good share of my time dealing with them...

B