Multitasking...I don't get it.

ODog4523

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 11, 2009
187
0
This looks like another work-around rather than true multitasking/backgrounding the way we think of it.

So how will this work? Every app that supports any of the 7 background features will be running all the time in stasis until they're brought to the front? Or is there a way to add or remove apps from the multitasking UI that pops up? Example, when I'm done listening to pandora I want to completely close it out so I can clean out the multitasking que of anything I don't want or need that quick access to.

Am I understanding that right? Maybe he just glossed over some of the finer details in the interest of making the point clearly.

So it'll be up to developers to build this into their apps, otherwise the feature won't be available.

Kind of a letdown that we still won't have true native multitasking.
 

gloss

macrumors 601
May 9, 2006
4,811
0
around/about
This looks like another work-around rather than true multitasking/backgrounding the way we think of it.

So how will this work? Every app that supports any of the 7 background features will be running all the time in stasis until they're brought to the front? Or is there a way to add or remove apps from the multitasking UI that pops up? Example, when I'm done listening to pandora I want to completely close it out so I can clean out the multitasking que of anything I don't want or need that quick access to.

Am I understanding that right? Maybe he just glossed over some of the finer details in the interest of making the point clearly.

So it'll be up to developers to build this into their apps, otherwise the feature won't be available.

Kind of a letdown that we still won't have true native multitasking.
But...what are the downsides, again? Give me a situation in which these APIs won't be sufficient.
 

PhoneI

macrumors 68000
Mar 7, 2008
1,562
471
But...what are the downsides, again? Give me a situation in which these APIs won't be sufficient.
The only situation I can think of, if is I use an app to remote into another computer, I am assuming the connection would be lost.
 

gloss

macrumors 601
May 9, 2006
4,811
0
around/about
The only situation I can think of, if is I use an app to remote into another computer, I am assuming the connection would be lost.
I'm curious if there's a way that the connection could be worked into the task completion API.
 

ODog4523

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 11, 2009
187
0
But...what are the downsides, again? Give me a situation in which these APIs won't be sufficient.
I guess the main limitation I see right now is that it's up to developers to build this into their apps, as apposed to the OS natively being able to put something into the background while it continues to do it business.

As long as the app makers get on top of this, I guess it'll be fine. I just don't dig the idea of every app that supports backgrounding APIs always being in the dock (if that's the case). What if every app on the phone supports one or more of those APIs? Or even half the apps? We're gonna have 20 or 30 icons to flick through in that backgrounding que? Are they gonna let us put folders in there too? :)
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,244
1,312
I just don't dig the idea of every app that supports backgrounding APIs always being in the dock (if that's the case). What if every app on the phone supports one or more of those APIs? Or even half the apps? We're gonna have 20 or 30 icons to flick through in that backgrounding que? Are they gonna let us put folders in there too? :)
On the demo videos floating around YouTube, they show how you can press/hold to remove an icon from the "background dock". What they don't explain is if the app actually stops running in the background, or if you've just removed the icon so you don't have to flip through it. :confused:
 

vizkiz

macrumors 6502a
Jul 22, 2008
874
0
Long Island, NY
Or is there a way to add or remove apps from the multitasking UI that pops up? Example, when I'm done listening to pandora I want to completely close it out so I can clean out the multitasking que of anything I don't want or need that quick access to.
I read (I think on Engadget) that in the multitasking dock, you hold an icon (like when you rearrange on a home screen), and a minus sign appears in the corner of the icon to close it.
 

ODog4523

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 11, 2009
187
0
On the demo videos floating around YouTube, they show how you can press/hold to remove an icon from the "background dock". What they don't explain is if the app actually stops running in the background, or if you've just removed the icon so you don't have to flip through it. :confused:
Hopefully that is how to completely close the app out.
 

anjinha

macrumors 604
Oct 21, 2006
7,271
62
San Francisco, CA
I guess the main limitation I see right now is that it's up to developers to build this into their apps, as apposed to the OS natively being able to put something into the background while it continues to do it business.

As long as the app makers get on top of this, I guess it'll be fine. I just don't dig the idea of every app that supports backgrounding APIs always being in the dock (if that's the case). What if every app on the phone supports one or more of those APIs? Or even half the apps? We're gonna have 20 or 30 icons to flick through in that backgrounding que? Are they gonna let us put folders in there too? :)
Here's how it works:

You can multitask with all the apps right now, even 3rd party apps. When you use any app and you press the home button that app goes to that multitasking dock. The app is not running in the background, it's sort of suspended and you can switch to it quickly.

If you want to remove an app from there you do like when you want to delete an app from your phone, you press and hold and a little "-" appears on it and you click to delete it.

When the apps are updated with the streaming API and the VOIP API besides being in the "suspended" state those apps will have those services running in the background.

 

ODog4523

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 11, 2009
187
0
Here's how it works:

You can multitask with all the apps right now, even 3rd party apps. When you use any app and you press the home button that app goes to that multitasking dock. The app is not running in the background, it's sort of suspended and you can switch to it quickly.

If you want to remove an app from there you do like when you want to delete an app from your phone, you press and hold and a little "-" appears on it and you click to delete it.

When the apps are updated with the streaming API and the VOIP API besides being in the "suspended" state those apps will have those services running in the background.

Thank you for the explanation!

Now what if I have an app open and just want to quit and go home like normal by pressing home once? Would I still have to go into the multitask dock and kill it from there too?
 

gianly1985

macrumors 6502a
May 30, 2008
798
0
Here's how it works:

You can multitask with all the apps right now, even 3rd party apps. When you use any app and you press the home button that app goes to that multitasking dock. The app is not running in the background, it's sort of suspended and you can switch to it quickly.
Ok, so the multitasking dock is just a "quick launcher of recent apps + improved suspended status in 4.0".

But how many "recent apps" does it hold? There must be a limit, or people will eventually have 100 apps in that launcher.....
 

Niiro13

macrumors 68000
Feb 12, 2008
1,717
0
Illinois
Yeah. Better than before, but you still aren't going to be able to let your bittorrent client run in the background 24/7. :D
The only situation I can think of, if is I use an app to remote into another computer, I am assuming the connection would be lost.
While I haven't tried it with the API yet, Apple did mention in the keynote about "task" completion where if you are uploading a photo to like Flikr, it will continue to upload in the background. Based on how uploading works now (simply a connection), that means that it will be a continuous connection in the background. So that's covered. Even your bittorrent client xD.

But yeah, I can't think of any application that needs more than these seven things. Basically what Apple took out of true backgrounding was the UI running in the background. So while your app has to refresh the screen and maybe redownload (if like a buddy list), it will save a good amount of battery and performance.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
I read (I think on Engadget) that in the multitasking dock, you hold an icon (like when you rearrange on a home screen), and a minus sign appears in the corner of the icon to close it.
I thought Jobs just said, "If you need to use a task manager, you're doing it wrong."

Clicking on a representation of a running app to get a kill option, sure sounds like a task manager to me.
 

rorschach

macrumors 68020
Jul 27, 2003
2,062
584
I thought Jobs just said, "If you need to use a task manager, you're doing it wrong."

Clicking on a representation of a running app to get a kill option, sure sounds like a task manager to me.
This:



is a far cry from this:



Of course most people posting on MacRumors would find the Windows Mobile task manager as easy to use as anything else. That's not true if you're like 95% of people who buy iPhones, whose interaction with their computer consists of checking email and surfing the web.
 

bova80

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2008
566
21
Pittsburgh, PA
even though the apps are in the dock they aren't using memory or battery life, its just like a save state and the app does not run anymore. its actually annoying though cause say you are in settings then go out and then go back into settings it takes to wherever you were last in there. and even more annoying if you end a call and don't let it go back to phone screen and just hit the home button because next time you go back to the phone it shows the end call screen.
 

vertigo235

macrumors 6502
Jun 6, 2009
442
0
even though the apps are in the dock they aren't using memory or battery life, its just like a save state and the app does not run anymore. its actually annoying though cause say you are in settings then go out and then go back into settings it takes to wherever you were last in there. and even more annoying if you end a call and don't let it go back to phone screen and just hit the home button because next time you go back to the phone it shows the end call screen.
True, but I bet you can override the save state by starting the app again from the home screen instead of from the fast-switch screen.

If you start from the home screen it will probably restart the app.
 

gianly1985

macrumors 6502a
May 30, 2008
798
0
even though the apps are in the dock they aren't using memory or battery life, its just like a save state and the app does not run anymore. its actually annoying though cause say you are in settings then go out and then go back into settings it takes to wherever you were last in there. and even more annoying if you end a call and don't let it go back to phone screen and just hit the home button because next time you go back to the phone it shows the end call screen.
What you call annoying, I call it AWESOME.

So did they create a REAL SNAPSHOT-LIKE RAM-FREE BRUTE-FORCE DEVELOPER-UNAWARE suspension state?? If yes, it's great. I think that having in mind the 3GS as a MINIMUM HARDWARE helped a lot while developing this "enhanced" suspension state.

In 3.0 the way an app resumed was somehow up to the developer (e.g. some games would go back to the main menù, some others would get you directly into the game), how does it work in 4.0? Is there a brute-force snapshot-like suspension EQUAL FOR EVERY app?
 

sportsfrk214

macrumors 6502a
Sep 18, 2007
564
28
I think a much more intuitive way to close apps completely would be to just be able to "flick" them off the multitasking bar and have them disappear in a puff of smoke. Kind of like how you can drag bookmarks off your bookmarks bar in Safari (on a computer) and they just disappear. I would imagine that this "flick" would be more efficient.
 

gianly1985

macrumors 6502a
May 30, 2008
798
0
nope it starts it the same as fast-switch
Does this apply to every appstore app too? So it overrides the suspension settings of the particular app? (in 2.0 and 3.0: some apps --> main menù, other apps --> straight into action).
 

vertigo235

macrumors 6502
Jun 6, 2009
442
0
I think a much more intuitive way to close apps completely would be to just be able to "flick" them off the multitasking bar and have them disappear in a puff of smoke. Kind of like how you can drag bookmarks off your bookmarks bar in Safari (on a computer) and they just disappear. I would imagine that this "flick" would be more efficient.
That would be cool.

I agree the holding and closing would get old.
 

Mac In School

macrumors 65816
Jun 21, 2007
1,290
0
I'd sure like to see every developer build a Quit button into their apps, if that is an option available to them.

For me, I think multi-tasking will be the exception, rather than the norm.