Music Streaming Services Like Spotify Now More Popular Than Video Sites

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The popularity of music streaming services has overtaken video sites for the first time in the U.S., according to market monitor BuzzAngle.

Services like Apple Music and Spotify delivered 114 billion streams in the first six months of 2016, compared to 95 billion video streams on sites like YouTube and Vevo. Overall, the market for streaming services increased by 58% year-on-year.


The surge in popularity was largely driven by the availability of albums by Beyonce, Rihanna and Drake. Rihanna's 'Work' is the most-streamed song of 2016 in the U.S, for example, while Drake's Views is the most requested album, being streamed 1.5 billion times since its release in April.

Adele's album 25 was not available to stream for seven months after it was released, yet figures show that it was streamed 168 million times in the first six days following its streaming debut on June 24.

The rise in streaming enabled music consumption in the U.S. to grow by 6.5%, despite CD sales being down 11% and digital sales falling 17%. Vinyl sales meanwhile enjoyed continuing growth, going up 17% to 3.1 million.

Spotify remains the world's most popular streaming music service with 30 million subscribers, boasting roughly twice as many paying subscribers as Apple Music, but the Swedish rival has been available in Europe for nearly eight years and in the U.S. since 2011, while Apple Music only just celebrated its first year of service.

Despite rising users and revenues, Spotify continues to operate at a loss due to expensive royalties and revenue sharing with music label partners. The service's losses rose by 10 percent to $195.7 million (173 million euros) last year, prompting some investors to question the viability of its business model.

For Apple Music's part, assuming that it maintains its current pace of growth, it is reasonable to assume that it will eventually eclipse Spotify as the top streaming service worldwide, benefiting from its prominence as a default app on iOS and offering a lengthy three-month free trial to get users hooked on the service.

Article Link: Music Streaming Services Like Spotify Now More Popular Than Video Sites
 

djcerla

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For Apple Music's part, assuming that it maintains its current pace of growth, it is reasonable to assume that it will eventually eclipse Spotify as thetop streaming service worldwide,
Buying Beats was the right move, at the right time, for a right price.
 

Shirasaki

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May 16, 2015
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So in USA, streaming service starts taking off. But we can still buy them from iTunes Store or local CD store right? Unless those artists go streaming only, and do not sell CDs at all.
In Japan however, CD is still the major source of selling music. And there is no obvious trend showing they will turn to streaming services in foreseeable future. They do adopt to hires music however.
 

John Mcgregor

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So in USA, streaming service starts taking off. But we can still buy them from iTunes Store or local CD store right? Unless those artists go streaming only, and do not sell CDs at all.
In Japan however, CD is still the major source of selling music. And there is no obvious trend showing they will turn to streaming services in foreseeable future. They do adopt to hires music however.
Smart people.
 

John Mcgregor

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What is a "stream"? Is one 3 min song a stream, and one 90 min film a stream? Comparing "streams" doesn't really seem like a like-for-like comparison. Maybe minutes streamed would be better.
I was thinking about the same. Films are usually 1.5 to 3 or more hours and shows anywhere from 40 minutes to 1 hour+.
 
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brendu

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Smart people.
I don't know, I don't need boxes full of CDs most of which I will not listen to more than every once in awhile. With streaming I can listen to whatever I want, whenever I want without having boxes of CDs or hard drives full of music I will rarely listen to. Also, this way when my kids want to listen to some Disney song of the week I don't have to constantly buy new kids music. I get that streaming isn't for everyone but for many of us it's the most sensible.
 

jayducharme

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Maybe minutes streamed would be better.
And I'm curious how a person's own music collection figures into the mix. For instance, with iTunes Match I'm listening to my own collection via streaming. And what about services like Beats1 or iHeart Radio? Are those figured into the streaming number?

I think the article is closer to fact when it mentions Drake and Rhianna. They have a huge fan base. If their latest release can only be streamed, that's what fans will do. It will be interesting to see if in the coming years more artists exclusively stream, which would drive subscription numbers higher.
 

John Mcgregor

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I don't know, I don't need boxes full of CDs most of which I will not listen to more than every once in awhile. With streaming I can listen to whatever I want, whenever I want without having boxes of CDs or hard drives full of music I will rarely listen to. Also, this way when my kids want to listen to some Disney song of the week I don't have to constantly buy new kids music. I get that streaming isn't for everyone but for many of us it's the most sensible.
Good for you, but i don't see how renting anything for life is a most sensible.
[doublepost=1467807300][/doublepost]
Majority of YouTube videos are only watched for 30 sec or less.
I personally watch from start to end, because i know what i like to watch and watch only that. For example world science festival and PBS.
 

miknos

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I had +60GB albums in my iTunes library. But with Spotify/AM/Google Music/etc, It's much more convenient having access to millions of songs instantly. Cheaper than buying, easier than ripping or downloading.

I don't know how some artists will adapt but streaming is the new trend. Business model always was:
Record Labels made money selling CD's. They had to spend money advertising the artists, be it paying to put artists in Top Charts to TV ads.
Artists made money performing in shows.

The ones I see losing are the record labels but they're the middle man.

Renting music for life is fair since you're listening to new songs all the time. $5 to $10 a month seems reasonable. Even FREE if you don't mind listening in lower quality (Spotify).
 

OllyW

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Renting music for life is fair since you're listening to new songs all the time.
Some of us also get a lot of pleasure from listening to old songs. :cool:

I can see why some people would rather go for streaming but I'll stick with buying the albums I really want. I do use free Spotify to sample new stuff but I always end up buying the album if I like it.
 

rdlink

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Good for you, but i don't see how renting anything for life is a most sensible.
As the OP said, streaming might not be for everyone, but characterizing it as "renting for life" is a little myopic, or disingenuous.

Let's assume you're going to listen to music for the rest of your life. Let's also assume you're going to keep discovering and buying new music for the rest of your life. If you are an individual who is going to spend more than $7-$10 a month for music, or a family who is going to spend more than $12-$15 a month it just makes sense to subscribe. Unless you're going to wake up one morning and just decide to stop buying music.

Before I subscribed to Apple Music I was averaging about $12-$14 per month buying music. My GF was probably buying $8-$10, and my stepdaughter was in the $10+ range. This was every month, and had been going on for years.

So, conservatively speaking we were spending in excess of $30+ for music between us. And because music downloads are usually a spur of the moment decision there were times when we would buy the same songs, and thus double, or at times even triple spend.

With streaming AM we all get access to Apple's whole library of millions of songs for $15 per month. We also get access to Apple Music Radio, which lets us build our own commercial free "stations" based on artist, songs, and albums we like. That, in turn helps us discover new music that we likely would not know about.
 
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John Mcgregor

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As the OP said, streaming might not be for everyone, but characterizing it as "renting for life" is a little myopic, or disingenuous.

Let's assume you're going to listen to music for the rest of your life. Let's also assume you're going to keep discovering and buying new music for the rest of your life. If you are an individual who is going to spend more than $7-$10 a month for music, or a family who is going to spend more than $12-$15 a month it just makes sense to subscribe. Unless you're going to wake up one morning and just decide to stop buying music.

Before I subscribed to Apple Music I was averaging about $12-$14 per month buying music. My GF was probably buying $8-$10, and my stepdaughter was in the $10+ range. This was every month, and had been going on for years.

So, conservatively speaking we were spending in excess of $30+ for music between us. And because music downloads are usually a spur of the moment decision there were times when we would buy the same songs, and thus double, or at times even triple spend.

With streaming AM we all get access to Apple's whole library of millions of songs for $15 per month. We also get access to Apple Music Radio, which lets us build our own commercial free "stations" based on artist, songs, and albums we like. That, in turn helps us discover new music that we likely would not know about.
I you rent you music for x amount of time and then (finally) realize that it's ******** and cancel you are left with nothing. I on the other hand will have something. Music discovery is not rocket science. I can ask Siri if i hear a song on radio that i like or i can go to iTunes store and just browse.

Pointless discussion. Your money, you can wipe ass with it as far as I'm concerned.
 
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rdlink

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I you rent you music for x amount of time and then (finally) realize that it's ******** and cancel you are left with nothing. I on the other hand will have something. Music discovery is not rocket science. I can ask Siri if i hear a song on radio that i like or i can go to iTunes store and just browse.

Pointless discussion. Your money, you can wipe ass with it as far as I'm concerned.
Wow, that was a classy reply. I was merely illustrating that there is a rational argument for subscribing to music streaming services for some people. There's no need to get huffy. You can spend your money any way you'd like.

I own music, also. In fact, over 4,000 songs. Let's assume for the sake of argument that all of those songs were purchased at 99 cents (Which they weren't, since many of them were part of $15 albums/CDs that sometimes only contained 10 songs.).

At 99 cents each I could subscribe to a $10 a month streaming service for 33 years before I spent more money.

And I wasn't trying to say that music discovery was "rocket science." But I don't listen to over the air radio. It's full of commercials and fillers, and AM gives me uninterrupted music that is so much more diverse than anything that Clear Channel would push down my throat.
 

AdonisSMU

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So in USA, streaming service starts taking off. But we can still buy them from iTunes Store or local CD store right? Unless those artists go streaming only, and do not sell CDs at all.
In Japan however, CD is still the major source of selling music. And there is no obvious trend showing they will turn to streaming services in foreseeable future. They do adopt to hires music however.
Kanye was the first album to go to #1 on the strength of streams. So artists will start to do it more and more.
 

Nramos33

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Aug 16, 2014
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Majority of YouTube videos are only watched for 30 sec or less.
Actually, the drop off is at 7 minutes. After 7 minutes people stop watching. It's like people fall off a clip.

This is according to Dan Russell who is a behavior researcher who works for Google and showed my university internal statistics.
 
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AdonisSMU

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Wow, that was a classy reply. I was merely illustrating that there is a rational argument for subscribing to music streaming services for some people. There's no need to get huffy. You can spend your money any way you'd like.

I own music, also. In fact, over 4,000 songs. Let's assume for the sake of argument that all of those songs were purchased at 99 cents (Which they weren't, since many of them were part of $15 albums/CDs that sometimes only contained 10 songs.).

At 99 cents each I could subscribe to a $10 a month streaming service for 33 years before I spent more money.

And I wasn't trying to say that music discovery was "rocket science." But I don't listen to over the air radio. It's full of commercials and fillers, and AM gives me uninterrupted music that is so much more diverse than anything that Clear Channel would push down my throat.
....and that's why streaming is a better bargain for most consumers. Ownership is overrated when all you want to do is listen to the music anyway.

What is over 4k songs?
 

Keane16

macrumors 6502a
Dec 8, 2007
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No brainer for me. Having used Spotify since 2009 and Apple Music over the last year I can't imagine going back to buying all my music.

I like the balance between buying the stuff I really like. So that I own it forever and it supports the artist above what they get from streams. Alongside streaming the flash in the pan stuff which I may listen to one summer but rarely again.

It's also way cheaper than buying everything as I used to in the past. And the music discovery side of it is massive. Just for You in Apple Music and Spotify's Discover are great. And way better for finding new music that I like better than any other method I've come across. I also like the various top charts and messing about with Siri playing older stuff I'd probably never have bought. Finally I love the ease of sharing playlists etc. Make a playlist, tap share and my other half has it instantly on her device. Brilliant.
 
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