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ISKOTB

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Aug 6, 2011
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I want something that I can expand in the future so was looking at the EOS 250D DSLR also the EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens for shooting portrait photos and YouTube videos with a bokeh effect.

Thank You
 
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mollyc

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Aug 18, 2016
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I think a Rebel line camera is perfectly fine for an entry level, starter camera. Changing manual controls won't be as easy as some higher end ones, but many people start out with the Rebel.

I don't think you will get much bokeh on a 24mm; good bokeh needs a longer focal length, on a crop body like the Rebel that would happen around 50mm (which acts like an 85mm). I'd be more inclined to go for a 35mm in your case if you think you have the space to back up that much, which will give you a creamier background than a 24mm will.
 

deep diver

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Jan 17, 2008
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I want something that I can expand in the future so was looking at the EOS 250D DSLR also the EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens for shooting portrait photos and YouTube videos with a bokeh effect.

Thank You
You are going to get a lot of really good feedback here. I'm going to toss in three thoughts.
1) Camera bodies change fairly frequently. Lens technology does not change as quickly. Also, the few good quality lenses you will ultimately get will cost more than a new body. I think that you'll do better with good glass and anticipate upgrading the body later.
2). Most camera stores will rent bodies and lenses. It is a great option for "try before you buy."
3). The very best camera is the one you use and enjoy.
 
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jwolf6589

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Dec 15, 2010
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I want something that I can expand in the future so was looking at the EOS 250D DSLR also the EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens for shooting portrait photos and YouTube videos with a bokeh effect.

Thank You
Hmm... This is a still shot camera. Have you considered a good camcorder for this task? Not saying the still shot camera won’t do the job but I know camcorders are more powerful for video. I know Sony makes a very nice 4K model at $1000. I personally have a Canon camcorder but it can only shoot in HD and not 4K. If I had the ideas it would be perfect for YouTube. Just something to consider. You can do what you wish but if money is not a problem I personally would use a camcorder for YouTube videos.
 

jaymc

macrumors 6502a
Nov 10, 2012
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I would think a mirrorless camera would do better for video, but maybe not.
I have to agree here. I've have had SLR/DSLRs for over 50 years now and have multiple lenses for my Nikon cameras; BUT if you are just starting out now, I would highly recommend going Mirrorless. Nikon along with other companies have moved away from the entry level DSLRs and are concentrating on Mirrorless cameras.
 

bousozoku

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Jun 25, 2002
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If you have any interest in video, go with a mirrorless model. You can switch between the viewfinder and the rear panel seamlessly. Trying to do video on a dSLR is a painful experience, though it can be done.

Canon's mirrorless system doesn't have many lenses but it is useful, if you want that brand. Any of the brands have good models, but learn about the lenses to see what matches what you want to accomplish, and go with that brand.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors Penryn
Feb 20, 2009
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What's your budget?

A 24mm lens IS NOT what you want for portraits or most video, I would think.

If you're buying Canon, and an EF-s model, a better lens might be the EFs 18-135 nano. Excellent image quality, quiet focusing for video, and the focal lengths you should need...
 

MacNut

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I would say spend more upfront, if you buy a cheaper kit and want to upgrade later it will limit your options down the road.
 

kallisti

macrumors 68000
Apr 22, 2003
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I think a Rebel line camera is perfectly fine for an entry level, starter camera. Changing manual controls won't be as easy as some higher end ones, but many people start out with the Rebel.

I don't think you will get much bokeh on a 24mm; good bokeh needs a longer focal length, on a crop body like the Rebel that would happen around 50mm (which acts like an 85mm). I'd be more inclined to go for a 35mm in your case if you think you have the space to back up that much, which will give you a creamier background than a 24mm will.
Minor quibble. Though the 50mm lens on a crop sensor will give the field of view of an 85mm lens on a full frame sensor, the “bokeh” will be the same as a 50mm lens on a full frame sensor. NOT the “bokeh” you would get with an 85mm lens on a full frame sensor.

To be even more pedantic, bokeh is technically the character of the out-of-focus areas and not the ability to “blur the background” or the degree of background blur. That is more accurately described in terms of depth of field.

Depth of field relates to subject distance from the sensor (the closer the subject, the shallower the DOF), aperture (the smaller the aperture number the shallower the DOF), and focal length of the lens (actual focal length—not “equivalent focal length” in 35mm full frame field of view terms—smaller focal lengths create larger DOF and longer focal lengths create shallower DOF). Background blurring also relates to distance of the subject from the background.

In general it is easier to blur the background with a full frame sensor compared to a crop sensor, everything else being equal.

However it is certainly possible to blur the background with a crop sensor (the extreme example being a phone camera). But it is helpful to understand the variables that go into creating a shallow DOF and a blurred background.

I know that you know all of this @mollyc, but I thought it might be helpful info for the OP.
 
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AlaskaMoose

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Apr 26, 2008
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If you have any interest in video, go with a mirrorless model. You can switch between the viewfinder and the rear panel seamlessly. Trying to do video on a dSLR is a painful experience, though it can be done.

Canon's mirrorless system doesn't have many lenses but it is useful, if you want that brand. Any of the brands have good models, but learn about the lenses to see what matches what you want to accomplish, and go with that brand.
On the contrary. Canon has numerous RF lenses. In addition to that, EF, EFS, and M lenses are fully compatible with Canon mirrorless cameras with the use an EF-R lens adapter. I am using all my Canon EF lenses on a Canon R6, and a Tokina SWA lens that has an EF mount. There are two types of RF lenses, one type is comprised of very expensive lenses (wider apertures, and better construction, water-proofing, etc.), and the other a cheaper line of lenses of narrower apertures, and perhaps not as sturdy as the expensive ones).
 
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bousozoku

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Jun 25, 2002
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On the contrary. Canon has numerous RF lenses. In addition to that, EF, EFS, and M lenses are fully compatible with Canon mirrorless cameras with the use an EF-R lens adapter. I am using all my Canon EF lenses on a Canon R6, and a Tokina SWA lens that has an EF mount. There are two types of RF lenses, one type is comprised of very expensive lenses (wider apertures, and better construction, water-proofing, etc.), and the other a cheaper line of lenses of narrower apertures, and perhaps not as sturdy as the expensive ones).
I didn't know that 10 was numerous.
 

ISKOTB

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Aug 6, 2011
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Florida
I have to agree here. I've have had SLR/DSLRs for over 50 years now and have multiple lenses for my Nikon cameras; BUT if you are just starting out now, I would highly recommend going Mirrorless. Nikon along with other companies have moved away from the entry level DSLRs and are concentrating on Mirrorless cameras.
what about the Canon EOS M50?
 

jaymc

macrumors 6502a
Nov 10, 2012
506
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Port Orchard, WA
what about the Canon EOS M50?
I'm a Nikon shooter, so am ignorant about Canon. My main point is if you are new to photography and are not invested in any lenses yet, I would recommend going mirrorless vice DSLR because that is where the industry is heading and, as many know, camera bodies come and go, but lenses last a lifetime.... and I believe mirrorless camera lenses and DSLR camera lenses are compatible with any brand.
 
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ISKOTB

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Aug 6, 2011
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Florida
I'm a Nikon shooter, so am ignorant about Canon. My main point is if you are new to photography and are not invested in any lenses yet, I would recommend going mirrorless vice DSLR because that is where the industry is heading and, as many know, camera bodies come and go, but lenses last a lifetime.... and I believe mirrorless camera lenses and DSLR camera lenses are compatible with any brand.
I find the Canon menu is easy to use IMO but then mirrorless lenses are expensive...can you recommend a Nikon model?
Thank You
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 601
Dec 15, 2010
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The Nikon Z6 is highly regarded for video. If you want something more entry level look at the Z50.
Use a camcorder instead if he can afford one. Was just playing with mine this morning and it’s far more capable and has more features for video than a still camera.
 

MacNut

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Use a camcorder instead if he can afford one. Was just playing with mine this morning and it’s far more capable and has more features for video than a still camera.
Disagree. For the most part the quality on a consumer camcorder are sub par. The sensor is small and you don't need the features other than raw video. Most of the work will be done in post.
 
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MacNut

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If I was in the market for a high end video camera I might look towards a cine camera. The prices have come down under 10k for decent quality.
 
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mollyc

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Use a camcorder instead if he can afford one. Was just playing with mine this morning and it’s far more capable and has more features for video than a still camera.
I agree with MacNut, in this day and age, unless I were a serious videographer I wouldn't choose a camcorder with a tiny sensor. The OP said he wants bokeh and the youtube look. That requires a full frame sensor and interchangeable lenses.
 

MacNut

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I agree with MacNut, in this day and age, unless I were a serious videographer I wouldn't choose a camcorder with a tiny sensor. The OP said he wants bokeh and the youtube look. That requires a full frame sensor and interchangeable lenses.
Even if I was a serious videographer I would be spending for a 1-2 inch CCD sensor. I'm not buying a camcorder at Best Buy. Im going to B&H.
 
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mollyc

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I am looking at the Z50 but can you recommend a lens that I can use for the bokeh effect?
Thank You
I’d probably consider the 35mm z mount lens. If that it too expensive consider the F mount 35mm 1.8 and the ftz adapter. It might be close to the same cost once you add in the adapter. Not sure the price difference.
 

Erehy Dobon

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For portrait photography you want a slightly longer focal length and a really fast lens (low f-speed) for A.) shallow depth-of-field and B.) easier to get handheld shots.

In 35mm equivalents, you want a 85mm/f1.4 or 100mm/f2 lens. The longer focal length will flatten facial features. The faster f-stop will blur out more of the ugliness in the background.

Since this is your primary interest, it is worth buying a dedicated fixed focal length lens for this. Do not buy the cheap zoom. They don't do anything very well.
 
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