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urbanlegend179

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 12, 2015
56
10
So I've decided I need to stop this habit of always waiting for the next best thing to be released, I am going to get the new 13-inch Macbook Pro 2020.

Shall I get the i5 or i7? And has anyone reported any problems with this new laptop?
 

Apple_Robert

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
24,669
29,941
In the middle of several books.
Haven’t seen any real problems noted here or elsewhere. While I don’t own either model, I don’t see why the i5 wouldn’t do well for you. Most of the time, people suggest getting the max specs for resale value, which is throwing good money out the window.

Real world usage that is more than the blink of a eye noticeable, is far different than specs on a sheet.


I have owned several MacBook Pros over the years and it is a great machine.
 
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urbanlegend179

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 12, 2015
56
10
I am getting the 10th gen CPU. It's more expensive obviously but I want the better performance and also because I feel like the resale value will be much better as I really want the 14 inch MBP that will likely come out at the end of 2021. But I can't wait that long. So the plan is to buy this then sell it after 18 months.

What do you guys recommend in terms of memory and storage?

PS - I have zero interest in the 16 inch MBP. Too big.
 
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supernet33

macrumors 6502
Jan 29, 2008
343
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it really depends on your needs, I would get the base 10th gen since it is good for my needs.
 
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iRun26.2

macrumors 68000
Aug 15, 2010
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I got the i7 version but spending the extra money was not really a big deal for me. The i5 probably is a better value but I want the most processing power I can get into this small package.
 
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urbanlegend179

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 12, 2015
56
10
I don't really use apps but I'll be heavily using Final Cut Pro, will 16GB be enough?
 
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Blowback

macrumors 6502a
Jan 10, 2018
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Get the i7 and test it for how you'll be using it.....you have 2 weeks (?) to trade up. Also: you won't question your choice in the future if you go with the i7.
 
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lclev

Contributor
Jul 29, 2013
363
151
Ohio
You say you will be using Final Cut Pro. I just got a 13" 2020 with an i7/32GB/1TB. I had originally ordered the i7/16GB/512GB model. I had a small video project which I put together with the 16GB model. I use Adobe Premiere - which I admit is a resource hog. The 16GB did okay but the memory was maxed out with a lot of swapping going on and rendering took longer than I felt it should. I decided to go with the 32GB to improve performance.

The 16GB was smooth when scrubbing and I was impressed with just how well it did work with Premiere and also with large and layered photos in Photoshop. But the 32GB model has surpassed it in performance.

It is up to you and I know Final Cut Pro is not as heavy a hitter on system resources as Premiere. But when Covid hit and I discovered I needed to be able to work from home, my laptop needs went from casual to needing more of a work horse. This 2020 13" with it's i7 and 32GB is doing what I need.

Just my 2 cents!
 
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urbanlegend179

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 12, 2015
56
10
Great, now I've been told this is basically the last intel Macbook? Can we really trust Apple to continue supporting this? What's the point of buying a Macbook if its dying?

It's so annoying, there's always something!
 
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nothingtoseehere

macrumors 6502
Jun 3, 2020
314
289
Great, now I've been told this is basically the last intel Macbook? Can we really trust Apple to continue supporting this? What's the point of buying a Macbook if its dying?

It's so annoying, there's always something!

"There's always something" - great motto of the whole life and universe ;)

Lots of discussions about the change here around. Most people, including me, think that Intel Macbooks will be supported for around 6-7 years at least, which would be 2027. My personal opinion: If you need a machine now, get it. It's not going to be bricked when the first non-Intel Macbook will arrive.
 
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magbarn

macrumors 68020
Oct 25, 2008
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Great, now I've been told this is basically the last intel Macbook? Can we really trust Apple to continue supporting this? What's the point of buying a Macbook if its dying?

It's so annoying, there's always something!
If you don't NEED it today, I'd wait. Yes, there's some here that believe Intel Macs will be supported for 6-7 years, but those of us who lived the last transition know this might not be the case. Apple released G5 Mac Pro's after the PowerPC-Intel transition was announced and they ONLY got 2 years worth of new OS releases, and 2 more years of just bug/security fixes and then that was it.

You could say that they were "supported" for 4 years, but in reality it was just 2.

Right now, Intel Macs have enjoyed many more years than even what Apple allows as DosDude's apps will let you install Catalina on certain 2010 Mac models. This is all thanks to them being all 64 bit Intel CPU's since then.
You're not going to get 9 years of longevity as once Apple kicks out the Intel code on MacOS, you're done...

I also lost massive resale value on the G4 Powerbook/Mac mini's that I stupidly bought in 2004/2005.

I'm also past the return period on my 2020 MBP 13 so I'm now stuck.

If you MUST have the 2020 MBP 10th gen, get the i5 version and save your money. I have the i7 and it's barely faster than the i5 in real world usage. It's not like the MBP 16 where the upgraded CPU's get you 2 more cores.
 
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nothingtoseehere

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Jun 3, 2020
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Just out of curiosity as I was in the Windows world in the 2010s: I am somewhat confused about when support for PowerPCs ceased.

If you don't NEED it today, I'd wait. Yes, there's some here that believe Intel Macs will be supported for 6-7 years, but those of us who lived the last transition know this might not be the case. Apple released G5 Mac Pro's after the PowerPC-Intel transition was announced and they ONLY got 2 years worth of new OS releases, and 2 more years of just bug/security fixes and then that was it.

You could say that they were "supported" for 4 years, but in reality it was just 2.

The switch to Intel was announced in June 2005.
The last security update to OS X 10.5 Leopard, as far as I understand, happened in June 2011. (https://www.macworld.com/article/1160720/security_update_2011_004.html)

One could claim that this counts as support but of course, I have no idea about how it felt in real life, and would be grateful for insights.
 
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Christopher Kim

macrumors 6502
Nov 18, 2016
312
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I am getting the 10th gen CPU. It's more expensive obviously but I want the better performance and also because I feel like the resale value will be much better as I really want the 14 inch MBP that will likely come out at the end of 2021. But I can't wait that long. So the plan is to buy this then sell it after 18 months.

Others have noted that there doesn't seem to be a big performance difference between i5 and i7. But I do want to discuss the idea that the resale value will be much better on the i7 vs i5, as I disagree with that.

IMO, of "upgrades" from base model that get you the best resale return, I feel like CPU upgrade is the worst. I feel like it's storage space, ram, video card, and then cpu, in that order (you could argue flipping ram and video card depending on the model).

Looking at illustrative numbers, the base 10th gen is $1,799. To upgrade the CPU is $200.

For round numbers, let's say in 2 years, you could sell the base model for $1,200 (eg. 2/3 of the price, lost 33% value).
I would actually suggest that with the i7 upgrade (and everything else equal), you could sell it for about the same (maybe $50 more). So assuming $50 more, the $200 upgrade, you've lost 75% (instead of 33% for the rest of the machine). Yes, overall you're getting more money on an absolute $ basis, but the "resale return value" of the CPU upgrade to me is probably quite a bit less than the "Base" part of the machine.

In general, I feel this is due to 1) people who buy on the secondary market are looking for a deal, and will generally compare your machine to what they could buy new, and they usually will compare to the base model. They typically won't pay up for a CPU upgrade, and 2) the buyer demographic who actually values the i7 upgrade is smaller than the overall market for your particular used 13" MBP. So more likely the ppl looking when you go to sell won't include those who value the i7.
 
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magbarn

macrumors 68020
Oct 25, 2008
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Just out of curiosity as I was in the Windows world in the 2010s: I am somewhat confused about when support for PowerPCs ceased.



The switch to Intel was announced in June 2005.
The last security update to OS X 10.5 Leopard, as far as I understand, happened in June 2011. (https://www.macworld.com/article/1160720/security_update_2011_004.html)

One could claim that this counts as support but of course, I have no idea about how it felt in real life, and would be grateful for insights.
Well in real life, it stunk as my PowerPC machines didn't get much software development after that. If you're content running 5+ year old software, be my guest.

Browser support is also a major issue as Safari is tied into MacOS releases and is unavailable to be upgraded separately. 3rd party browser support also drops off also so hard to get on modern websites as time goes on.

Another side effect is resale as my >$2500 G4 powerbook barely sold for $700 2 years later and my G4 Mac mini (who I gave to my parents) got it's last official Firefox update in 2012. It's now running tenfourfox which can do some modern websites, but secure ones like banking have issues.

Intel Macs might be different as they can always backdrop to windows 10 or run VM's so they might not tank as quickly in price.
[automerge]1594151090[/automerge]
Others have noted that there doesn't seem to be a big performance difference between i5 and i7. But I do want to discuss the idea that the resale value will be much better on the i7 vs i5, as I disagree with that.

IMO, of "upgrades" from base model that get you the best resale return, I feel like CPU upgrade is the worst. I feel like it's storage space, ram, video card, and then cpu, in that order (you could argue flipping ram and video card depending on the model).

Looking at illustrative numbers, the base 10th gen is $1,799. To upgrade the CPU is $200.

For round numbers, let's say in 2 years, you could sell the base model for $1,200 (eg. 2/3 of the price, lost 33% value).
I would actually suggest that with the i7 upgrade (and everything else equal), you could sell it for about the same (maybe $50 more). So assuming $50 more, the $200 upgrade, you've lost 75% (instead of 33% for the rest of the machine). Yes, overall you're getting more money on an absolute $ basis, but the "resale return value" of the CPU upgrade to me is probably quite a bit less than the "Base" part of the machine.

In general, I feel this is due to 1) people who buy on the secondary market are looking for a deal, and will generally compare your machine to what they could buy new, and they usually will compare to the base model. They typically won't pay up for a CPU upgrade, and 2) the buyer demographic who actually values the i7 upgrade is smaller than the overall market for your particular used 13" MBP. So more likely the ppl looking when you go to sell won't include those who value the i7.
Agreed, base models will almost always recoup more % of original price on resale. Rare exemptions are crippled Macs that sold with only 2gb of soldered ram like the MBA's of recent past which boosted the 4gb model's price or the 2014 quad core less Mac mini which boosted the price of the quad core 2012 Mac minis vs their 2 core brethren.

The 2020 MacBook Pro 13 8th gen ironically will likely retain most value as most non-nerds are going to be searching only for 2020 MacBook Pro 13 with ram and storage as a consideration in the resale market. Most Joes/Janes don't care about if it has 2 or 4 TB3 ports, don't really know about the differences, and therefore won't pay the extra $500 you're trying to get extra for your 10th gen on resale.
 
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