My MacBook died (harddrive fail)

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by piatti, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. piatti macrumors 6502a

    piatti

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    Location:
    USA
    #1
    What makes hard drive fail? Is it when there is too much heat? Is constant or too frequent fan noise a sign of damage to the internal hard drive? If I replace just the hard drive it's 133 dollars but if I replace the screen too because about 1-2 inches of it on the right edge is not showing, it's 290 dollars (flat rate to fix everything). Do you think it's worth it to fix this computer?

    I was looking at craiglist to buy new computer. Would this one able to handle Windows 7?: Dell Inspiron 5100 Laptop Pentium 4 2.4 GHZ with 1GB memory, 60GB disk

    I was looking at this Best Buy cheap computer:
    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Lenovo+...lack/3179912.p?id=1218386649813&skuId=3179912

    It says it has AMD E-Series dual-core processor E-350 (how fast is that?) and has Processor speed of 1.6GHz (Isn't that very slow?)
     
  2. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #2
    E-350 is rubbish. Avoid.

    $290 seems reasonable as it'll still blow the doors off the E-350.

    After you get it fixed buy Lion and it'll feel new again.
     
  3. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    Location:
    USA
    #3
    you mean although e-350 is slow $290 is a good price for it?
     
  4. Sonhascome macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Location:
    Maryland
    #4
    I would stick with the mac. you're hard drive may have failed if you leave the computer on a lot. Hard drives have moving parts in them thus the more they are used the more likely they are to break
     
  5. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    Why would you stick with the mac?
     
  6. inteljoe macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #6
    Internal Hard Disk Drives (HDD's) fail all the time.

    Just to give you a quick lesson, inside HDD is a platter (some have several depending on capacity and design). The platter is essentially a spinning disk, most drives spin between 5400 rpm (rotations per minute) to 7200 rpm. Some performance drives can go up 15000 rpm. Your data is stored on the platter(s), and a mechanical arm which also moves very quickly to read or write data on those platters. The inherent problem with HDD's is that because it rely's on mechanical parts it can be subject to failure from shock, vibration, or just wear. Unfortunately you can't predict a drive failure, sure there are built in warnings (like SMART tests or POST tests) and watching for big performance issues. You can't really predict when a drive is or going to fail.

    Also HDD's are considered consumable parts, meaning more or less that they are expected to fail at some point.

    If you wish check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_disk_drive and the article will give a lot more infromation about how HDD's came about and function.

    With that said, repairing a hard drive in a computer is like putting new brakes on a car. You are going to have to do it eventually, the one other big difference that only you can determine the value of your data and so create a backup plan accordingly.

    In terms of buying another computer, from my experience. If you spend 800+ usually Lenovo or HP Business PC's (NOT CONSUMER) are the best and/or have better customer service situations.

    If you are spending less than 800, generally any pc will do. Most PC's sold for less than 800 have one thing in mind. How little can we put into these to make as much money as possible. I have seen way too many $299 notebooks that are built from refurbished parts as new machines. I find that the $299 "door-buster" computers have problems or are built from remanufactured/refurbished parts. Basically these are throw away computers, I hate to say it but it's just the way the business has headed the last 5 years.

    With all that said, I would say that you should ask someone that has experience with computers. Working with them directly, and get a feel on your own of what experiences people have had. If you go to any retail store and speak to anyone is Sales, take anything said with a grain of salt. I know that sounds cynical, but trust me most retail stores don't train there associates well and anything they are trained on is in a way that tries to make them more money.

    I know this must sound more like a rant than advice, but thats my 2 cents for you.

    Bottom line advice, fix the mac it will be worth more 3 years from now than a PC of similar ago.
     
  7. BigDukeSix macrumors 6502a

    BigDukeSix

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Location:
    34.6700N 118.1590W
    #7
    Hard drives are pretty easy to replace, unless you have an older macbook.
    And, new HDD are not all that expensive.
    Go here, plug in your model of Macbook and see what is available. Also, these guys have great tech help and also probably have a video showing you how to do it.
    http://eshop.macsales.com/MyOWC/
     
  8. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    Location:
    USA
    #8
    Mine's from 2008 summer.
     
  9. tom vilsack macrumors 68000

    tom vilsack

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Location:
    ladner cdn
    #9
  10. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #10
    Hard drives can last a long time or die quickly. Laptop drives specifically take a lot of stress. They're packed into a small form factor and the very nature of how we use laptops is pretty hard on them (close them when they're hot, disks accessed as they're spinning up). It's all over the place in terms of hard drives overall. With laptops if you want the best longevity possible, don't close it if you hear the fans running hard or your machine feels exceptionally warm. Instead simply close out your programs and give it a little time to cool down. In that model the hard drive isn't what runs hottest anyway.

    If you're doing this yourself I suggest exercising some caution. Touch something metal to discharge any static before starting. If possible don't stand on carpeting when working inside your computer. The thing about static is it's possible to lower the life expectancy of a device without knowing it, but it's easily avoidable. If you go with an SSD I'd suggest doing your research. They're all over the place in reliability.

    Depending on what you need in a computer, that macbook can still be a zippy machine.
     
  11. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Location:
    Terra
    #11
    As others have said, the question isn't if a HDD will fail but when. It's a moving part, it's guaranteed to fail someday.

    Replacing the HDD is ridiculously easy, do it. I have a previous gen MacBook and it works great. Also, blueroom was saying you should NOT get the e-350 and that $290 is a good investment into your Mac.
     
  12. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    Location:
    USA
    #12

    Where do I plug in the model?
     
  13. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Location:
    Terra
    #13
    Start on the right side...
     

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