iPad Pro My personal thoughts regarding the iPad Pro

Discussion in 'iPad' started by ciarals, Sep 21, 2015.

  1. ciarals macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Location:
    Italy
    #1
    Hello guys. It's time for some thoughts regarding the iPad Pro :)

    I currently have a MacBook Pro Late 2008 with all the possible upgrades (8 GB RAM and Samsung 850 EVO SSD) and an iPad mini 1. I currently use the Mac for:
    • usual things (email/web navigation)
    • some less common things (Wordpress/Torrent downloads/streaming to Apple TV)
    • some Pro things (Final Cut Pro X editing)
    The % of the 3 "areas" is: 70% for the usual things, 20% for the less common things, 10% for the Pro things (I'm a videomaker for passion, not for job, just 2-3 videos every year).

    This little introduction was important to understand better if the iPad Pro is the right product for me (and for everyone else with my specs) or not. You know, for me the iPad Pro will never 100% replace the MacBook Pro: Final Cut Pro X is not (yet) available on the iPad Pro and some other things (like Torrent downloads) are pretty difficult to reproduce on the iPad Pro (for now). But what about the rest? Web browsing? Email? The iPad is just perfect for these things.

    It's 2 years I'm in the mood of buying a new MacBook Pro, but the high price for the top configuration and the fact that my MacBook Pro is still performing great with pretty all the usual things, has always stopped me. The great things I like about the new Macs (a part from the highest specs) is the battery (my Mac has only 2-3 hours) and the Retina Display. And now this iPad Pro is changing my thoughts... It has the 2 specs I really love of the new Macs (battery and Retina), it has power and it has the right screen dimension.

    So, should I buy a new super powered MacBook Pro (for not less than 3000$) to use it on its top specs only on 10% of the time (FCPX) and 90% of the time not using its great specs.... or spend 1000$ for the iPad Pro, using it at the top of the specs for everything and keep the MacBook Pro Late 2008 for FCPX editings?

    I'm currently really thinking of buying the iPad Pro, sell the iPad mini and keep the MacBook Pro Late 2008 just for FCPX and the other less things that the iPad can't do...

    I know that there are other people like me, so I'm waiting for your thoughts. Thank you and sorry for the loooong post :)
     
  2. Left4DeadBoy macrumors regular

    Left4DeadBoy

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    Sep 20, 2015
    #2
    Personally, I have yet to use Apple TV. iPad Pro must be good for that.
     
  3. ciarals thread starter macrumors member

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    Mar 26, 2010
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    Italy
    #3
    Absolutely yes. But the thing I can't do for now with an iPad is streaming a non-iTunes file to the Apple TV. On the Mac I use Beamer, that is absolutely fantastic: this is one of the (few) apps that will not work on the iPad (Pro) for the moment and that will keep my Mac alive. But for the rest? A new MacBook Pro? Is the high price really worth it? Or the iPad Pro will do pretty all the usual things?
     
  4. Codeseven macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 31, 2008
    #4
    I'm in a similar boat.

    I too have a late 2008 MBP but with the only upgrade being 8Gb ram. As your has, mine just keeps chugging along (despite mine having a cracked screen, swollen battery, cracked and semi-functional Track Pad and a semi-functional Superdrive). I know I'm not a power user because the old specs on this thing would have not been adequate long ago. I use it for all the usual things, email, web surfing, Search, watching videos, but I also use guitar amp modeling software and recording software which isn't super demanding.

    I too have been waiting for the MBP's (Skylake!) and have been anticipating forking out thousands of dollars to buy one.

    A couple months ago I purchased my first iPad, a basic 16Gb Air 1, to take with me on vacation instead of lugging around my old MBP again. I've really been enjoying how light it is and pretty much fully capable of doing 80% of what I normally do.

    Now I'm rethinking my plans of buying another MBP. I don't think I need the power, probably not even a MacBook. So when the iPad Pro was announced I'm starting to feel for a user like me this could be the perfect in between device. Meaning in between Air 1 and MBP. As far as no OS X, for my use there are a few excellent iOS software programs I've been using on the iPad in place of what I was using on the MBP so no loss there. Also, I suspect assuming the iPad Pro's gain in popularity the developers will start pumping out more capable software alternatives (to their OS X versions).

    My one concern about the iPP is connectivity. I don't have a problem with the Air's single Lightning port so I shouldn't with the iPP's single Lightning port. But I do like the flexibility of the various ports on my MBP (USB, Firewire, Xpress) and have used them to connect peripherals to (mainly Audio Interfaces or speakers). I was hoping for at least a USB-C port on the iPP. But, I think I've read that the Lightning ports capabilities can be enhanced through software or firmware updates, could be wrong though. Also, it's still a bit of a mystery if the iPP's Smart Connector is 'only' for connecting a simple keypad case or is it planned for connecting data demanding peripherals also?

    Anyhow, ya, I'm hoping the iPP feedback from users will be positive so I can sell the Air 1 and set aside the old MBP for occasional OS X use.
     
  5. zhenya macrumors 603

    zhenya

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    Jan 6, 2005
    #5
    I would say, as someone who has used a series of iPads as my primary home and personal computing device for the last couple of years, to consider strongly the form factor of the iPad in your decision. The iPad is great for reading, but much less so for many other situations. And the much larger and heavier pro model is going to greatly diminish that one place where it truly excels as it will become somewhat unwieldy. I'm somewhat a student of these smaller form factor devices - with an iPad 4, an iPad Air2, a MacBook Air 11", a MacBook retina 12" and a Surface Pro 3 in my household at the moment. The iPad, without a decent way to prop it up, is a really difficult device to use comfortably as a computer, even with a keyboard, as a video device, etc. You really lose a lot of functionality by not being able to adjust the screen angle. Also, as nice as the improvements with multi-tasking, keyboard support, etc. are in iOS9, interacting with an iPad is still fundamentally more difficult as soon as your workflow gets the least bit complicated. Don't get me wrong, I love my iPads, and I am thrilled Apple continues to expand the hardware and software, just giving you some perspective.

    For your use, unless you are wedded to the tablet form factor for some reason, (stylus, etc) would strongly suggest you consider the 12" MacBook. It fulfills nearly 100% of your stated needs, in a size that is not all that much different than the iPad pro (and probably smaller and lighter once you add a keyboard). It's more powerful than your current laptop, fwiw.
     
  6. ciarals thread starter macrumors member

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    Mar 26, 2010
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    Italy
    #6
    Yes, we're in the exact situation, asking ourselves if a new MacBook Pro is worth the money for the % of normal use VS pro use. The question is still not answered, but the iPad Pro maybe is helping us with the choice :)

    You're 100% right, but the MacBook 12" will be more expensive that the new iPad Pro. Also, if I'm going to buy a MacBook 12", I would definitely buy a Pro so that I can use FCPX at its full capacity. I don't like to buy a new device, spending more than 1500/2000$ and have a medium-powered device. You know, from the moment I'm spending more money, I prefer to spend even more money to buy a machine that can resist for years. I did this for my current MacBook Pro and we're now in its 7 year without any problem. So what's the point of upgrading the MacBook Pro with a MacBook? Yes, it's more powerful, but it will not handle FCPX in its best, as know is doing my current Mac. Yes, a bit more powerful, but is it worth the cost? The iPad Pro opens a different scenario, making me use the iPad Pro for nearly everything and using the actual MacBook Pro only for FCPX.
     
  7. Mivo macrumors regular

    Mivo

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    Jan 23, 2015
    Location:
    Germany
    #7
    I feel that you'd be happier with the new Mini, or the Air 2, paired with a new rMBP or a MacBook Air. You mentioned that the top configurations are expensive, which is true, but if you are now, in 2015, still happy with your 2008 model, I think a mid-range MBP would last you five or so years just fine, you'd not need the most expensive model based on your usage profile.

    On the other hand, the iPad Pro might work out for you. Most of you do, you can do on it, and it's more portable than a MBP. Things like torrenting won't work on the iPad Pro. You did mention that you'd keep the 2008 MB, so you'd have alternatives, but then, you're still depending on a normal computer, kind of nixing a good portion of why you'd get an iPad Pro (instead of a smaller, cheaper, more portable iPad).

    One of my concerns with the iPad Pro is that it's a first generation device that goes into somewhat unexplored territory. Chances are that in a year, when the revised version comes out, you'd get a more refined product for the same money that may feature more drastic advantages (the step from iPad 1 to 2 was pretty big, the step from Air 1 to Air 2 not as much). Especially for someone who doesn't upgrade every year, and who doesn't spend money loosely, I think a 2nd gen iPad Pro would be a safer bet.

    But this is all speculation. :)
     
  8. ciarals thread starter macrumors member

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    Italy
    #8
    Very good post, thank you. My only concern is that I should buy a new rMBP/MBA + iPad Mini/Air 2 to be "happy", while I could have everything set with just an iPad Pro + keeping the old MBP...

    Regarding the 1st generation, yes, you're totally right :)
     
  9. Codeseven macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 31, 2008
    #9
    That's a good point about if an old 2008 MBP (old tech Core 2 Duo/ 7200rpm HD) is capable of running the software you use, then even a 'basic' low spec MacBook should easily outperform that old laptop.
     
  10. modernaccord macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 20, 2015
    Location:
    Seattle, WA region
    #10
    I'd keep the MacBook and get an iPad pro for daily use. You'll inevitably run into things that require a file system. For 95% of the time, iPad will cut it. The other 5%, you'll really be itching for a computer.
     
  11. ciarals thread starter macrumors member

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    Mar 26, 2010
    Location:
    Italy
    #11
    Yes, I can confirm. My MacBook Pro Late 2008 with the top configuration of its time + 8 GB RAM + Samsung 850 EVO SSD is doing everything great. Of course when it comes to FCPX he's not at its top performance, but for the normal use he's still great. Of course, latest OSX. And never formatted. From the original OSX it has installed (Leopard) I've always updated, never re-installed. It's really a great Mac, that's why I don't want to stop using it, but just use it less :)

    Yes, that is exactly what I intended to do... I only have a few doubts:
    1. What about the file system? And if I will need it more than what I think? I don't want to use the iPad and the Mac 50%/50%
    2. I'm currently using the iPad mini and it's really great... Maybe I just could switch to the iPad Air and that would be fine after all, without switching to the big iPad Pro... As I said, the main usage will be the usual one, not any graphichal/visual things... What do you think?
     
  12. Mivo macrumors regular

    Mivo

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    Jan 23, 2015
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    #12
    See, that's exactly the thing I wonder about too, for myself. There are some uses where the 13" display of the iPad Pro would be really nice (as a board for chess and Go, for reading DIN-A4 PDF files without any zooming, to watch a movie with the device propped up, for writing a lot of text with the physical keyboard, etc.), but in other ways the larger size would be a hindrance (less portability, greater weight, more bulky; too big for regular, non-PDF ebooks, too big for holding it on the palm of one hand and browsing/reading, too large for taking it to bed, etc).

    I'd gain some, and I'd lose some, and I'm not sure if I wouldn't end up with a Pro and still use the Air 2 a lot of the time, plus my laptop. It's hard to predict how I'd use it, ahead of time. I guess we could buy one and then sell it three months later if we don't like it :p. (I'm pretty sure I'll wait for the 2nd gen Pro, though, especially since I already have the Air 2 and am very satisfied with it -- there's not much pull for me to replace it just now.)
     
  13. ZBoater macrumors G3

    ZBoater

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    #13
    XCom Enemy Within is going to play very nicely on an iPad Pro...
     
  14. spiderman0616 macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    #14
    I have run into several situations with the iPad in real daily use cases that just make it unacceptable as my daily driver, even with iOS 9 on board:

    1. This is a big deal: I can't change mic inputs. I do a lot of podcasting and use an Apogee MiC for all my recorded audio. On a Mac, whether I'm using Skype, GarageBand, FaceTime, or any other software that monitors/records my voice, I can switch the default input to the Apogee MiC so that my voice sounds clear and natural. On iOS, I can use the Apogee MiC in GarageBand, but for everything else, you either have to use your earbud mic or the built in iPhone/iPad mic. This is unacceptable if you want your podcast to actually sound good.

    2. Office. Yes, I know that there is a good version of Office for iPad, but it's not the software that's the killer here, it's the lack of versatility. If I'm in split screen mode on my iPad using Word and Safari or Excel and Outlook, my messenger software (Microsoft Lync) is now "minimized" on the iPad and when that happens, it shows me as offline, when in reality, I'm just not looking at that app. But I work from home, and the last thing I want is for my boss to think I'm watching TV and drinking beers instead of working, so iPad is a no go there too. If you want a good idea of how incredibly limiting this is, just try split screen mode on El Capitan. It's a productivity improvement on iPad, but makes OS X LESS productive.

    3. Conferencing. My company uses a lot of different kinds of collaboration software. Most of us have two monitors so that we can run the conference call on one, and do other things on the other. Until the iPad actually has decent, full featured conference call software as well as the ability to connect to an external monitor (or ideally two external monitors) it is completely useless to me as a conference call machine. Especially if I'm the one who needs to share my screen.

    4. Going back to podcasting: hardcore syncing, editing, and publishing of audio content from GarageBand, which is what I use on the Mac, ranges from difficult to downright impossible on iOS. It's just not ideal on a touch interface. You need a mouse or a trackpad to do the really intricate editing, especially in a double ended podcast where your cohost is 1500 miles away and needs to send you isolated audio to edit and sync.

    5. The mix of keyboard/touchscreen for typing up long bits of text is just.........I don't even know how to describe how frustrating it is.

    Apple has put its foot down and said that the iPad Pro is the computer of the future, and they've succeeded in making a lot of people think it's a laptop replacement. I am guessing that a lot of people who believe this are in for a huge wakeup call if they sell their laptops and use this machine instead. Situations will come up that just don't have a good solution on iOS. I would love to be able to use something as thin and light as an iPad Pro as my only laptop, but iOS is going to need HUGE changes before I can do that.
     
  15. Supermallet macrumors 65816

    Supermallet

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    #15
    I don't have all the use cases you do, but I agree with your general assessment. The iPad Pro as it stands on day one isn't a sufficient laptop replacement if you do anything more than the most basic computing tasks (web browsing, email, etc.). And if all you're doing is basic tasks, why go for a Pro when the iPad Air 2 is more portable, ergonomic, and plenty powerful?

    There are a few areas where the Pro will excel over the Air 2, if you're in specific creative fields the Pro may be perfect for you. But the applications have to be broader than that, and I think in time they will be. The Pro is Apple's first real stab at making a tablet as laptop replacement. At the moment, it feels mostly like a bigger iPad, but I have a feeling that in the next few years, Apple will really turn it into a hybrid laptop/tablet that will differentiate itself from the Air and Mini lines. I just wish they were more aggressive about that on day one, but I think Apple needs some time to really learn how to best implement this strategy.

    The one thing I'm sure they DON'T want to do is what Microsoft is doing: One OS that runs on all platforms. Apple wants each device to fill a particular niche, and so eventually what will happen is the iOS we see on the Pro will simply have more functionality than the Air or Mini (or iPhone), but will not simply be OS X on a tablet. It will be its own thing, and I'm curious to see what that will be. But it's not there yet.
     
  16. RockSpider macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    What's wrong with having one OS running on all platforms, it's beyond ridiculous having a different OS for different devices. I've already got Windows 10 on computers, a Mac and a tablet and phones, Microsoft is back on track and the future is looking rosy.
     
  17. spiderman0616 macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    #17
    I don't have a problem with it as long as it's optimized for touch when you need touch and optimized for keyboard and mouse when you need keyboard and mouse.

    The thing I have a problem with is trying to shoehorn a tablet into being a laptop. If you're not going to run software that's indicative to using a laptop, it's not really a laptop. I've heard varying opinions on whether or not the Surface Pro is very good as a tablet, but haven't tried one myself.
     
  18. Supermallet macrumors 65816

    Supermallet

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    #18
    I didn't say there's something wrong with it. I said it's one thing Apple won't be doing. Just look at how they've implemented app thinning. It's very modular, designed to send only the elements of the app that a given device can use. This is 180 degrees removed from what Microsoft is doing with Windows 10, where every app has all the elements needed to run on any platform. Apple and Microsoft have two entirely different philosophies about this, and neither one is necessarily right or wrong, it's just different.
     
  19. RockSpider macrumors 6502a

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    #19
    I don't have the Surface Pro but I do have 2 Surfaces which are not as good as the Pro, I can assure you they are excellent at what they do, and I know the Pro is much better. Don't believe all the crap that comes out of Apple, one OS is the way of the future.
    Soon you'll be able to attach your Windows phone to a monitor or a TV and have a full blown computer and do everything you can do at work.
     
  20. RockSpider macrumors 6502a

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    #20
    I like Microsofts philosophy better, one app and run it anywhere. I've got nothing thing against iPads, they're just not Pro, I know, I've got a few of them, well 3 anyway plus a few other tablets.
     
  21. Supermallet macrumors 65816

    Supermallet

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    #21
    Each approach has its pros and cons. Microsoft is taking a one size fits all approach. All apps run on all platforms, but that means that every app has all the elements no matter whether or not the platform you're using can take advantage of them. That app on your desktop has elements designed for the Xbox, and vice versa. The good thing about this is that the apps work wherever you put them with no fuss. The downside is that all apps take up more space as a result. Windows 10 is convenient but not lean.

    Apple is taking a very data aggressive approach with iOS 9. App thinning makes app installs modular and also means that the apps may load or unload data when the OS thinks it's necessary. The downside of this is that some people want a continuum like Windows 10 has, and Apple is absolutely not doing that. There's also some question as to what happens when you take your device offline, it could lead to more apps requiring an always on connection. The upside is the space savings are absolutely incredible and app makers have a little more flexibility with what they can do, because Apple will only load elements that are appropriate for each device onto that device.

    But the difference in this approach tells me that the Pro will eventually occupy its own unique space. It won't be a tablet running OS X but it also won't be just a bigger iPad Air. It will be its own thing, but it's too early to tell what that will ultimately look like.

    I think in a few years though, I could see myself buying a mid-level Macbook and an iPad Pro and using a combination of the two for my computing needs.
     
  22. RockSpider macrumors 6502a

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    #22
    I hear you about app thinning and it's a good thing, however storage is cheap and plentiful these days so there's no real need to go overboard. Who knows what's going to happen in a few years, but right now I think Microsoft is taking the right track, Apple not so much, but I've been wrong about Apple before, there are a lot of lovers out there making their task easier.
    I don't follow any company blindly, especially Apple because of their price gouging nature, not that I can't afford it, I just don't always see the need to pay over the top prices for everything. I pretty much have a foot in all camps, Android, Linux, Windows, OSX and IOS, it allows me to pick products based on price and suitability for my needs.
    Who knows, I might even end up with an iPad Pro to watch Netfix and check the Stockmarket at the same time.
     
  23. Supermallet macrumors 65816

    Supermallet

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    #23
    And I think that's a perfectly reasonable approach to take. For the most part I'm in the Apple camp, I prefer the way OS X works over Windows, and I definitely prefer iOS over Android. I like Apple's modular approach but I also like that different companies are tying different things. It increases innovation when companies come up with different solutions to common problems.
     
  24. placidity44 macrumors 6502

    placidity44

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    May 20, 2015
    #24
    Or just as a thought you could get an Air 2 and use the 500 or so to stash away and eventually replace your mb with a MacBook Air or entry level 13" rMBP. Could go the refurb route as well.
     
  25. Mivo macrumors regular

    Mivo

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    #25
    However, "run" and "optimized for" are vastly different things, and Windows teaches that lesson well. The Surface Pro 3 also shows that trying to be several devices in one leads to all incarnations to be very mediocre. The SP3 isn't very usable as a tablet (low battery life, not silent, gets hot, not a lot of tablet-designed software) and only average as a laptop. I don't find the SP3 to be very "pro", either.It's not so different from many other multi-function devices. I'd rather have a separate coffee maker, toaster, and stove than all three in one device.

    Personally, I'd rather have different operating systems for different devices if that yields me software that makes full and optimal use of the device it is designed for. What I do value is connectivity and ease of data exchange, and that is where I feel iOS could improve a lot still.

    Microsoft also seems to be moving into the direction of a subscription model for the OS itself. That's a dealbreaker for me and the reason I'm slowly moving away from Windows.
     

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