My shoulders hurt

briannaharbor

macrumors member
Original poster
May 22, 2014
84
0
Hi,

I work at a desk, typing most of the day, which often makes my shoulders get sore. I get massages monthly, but I don't think they're helping the problem, only delaying it for a while. Has anyone ever had acupuncture? Would that help? I dont know why, but it looks really therapeutic.

If anyone else has any suggestions, I'm open.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
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The Far Horizon
Weekly massages would be my suggestion, with perhaps a particular emphasis on back and shoulder relief. For me, they work.

Some years ago, I tried acupuncture, and found it uneven.
 

briannaharbor

macrumors member
Original poster
May 22, 2014
84
0
Weekly massages would be my suggestion, with perhaps a particular emphasis on back and shoulder relief. For me, they work.

Some years ago, I tried acupuncture, and found it uneven.
What do you mean, you found it uneven? I can't really afford weekly massages... I would like something that eliminates the problem, and just thinking about all the needles is really therapeutic. It just sounds like a good idea. My husband says I'm crazy.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
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An Island in the Salish Sea
On top of weekly massages...and why not... massages feel good whether they are therapeutic or not - I would work harder to prevent the soreness. There are all sorts of exercises you can do during the day to stretch the muscles and keep them from getting sore in the first place. That should be the priority, imo... keeping them healthy in the first place.

I don't know the exercises first hand since my job doesn't require them.. but I know I read about them all the time. I'm sure a little googling will help. Or even consulting an ergonomics specialist.

Good luck.

I have bad shoulders, from a skiing injury. Take it from me - keep your shoulders healthy. It is not fun having wonky ones.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
50,772
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The Far Horizon
What do you mean, you found it uneven? I can't really afford weekly massages... I would like something that eliminates the problem, and just thinking about all the needles is really therapeutic. It just sounds like a good idea. My husband says I'm crazy.
For me, acupuncture didn't really work, not the way I had hoped it might. Massages do. And, I have a weekly back and shoulder massage which I find wonderful.

If you find the thought of needles therapeutic, fine. I found the reality of needles varied ; some weeks, it was useful, other weeks, a lot less so. But each to their own.

Go for whatever works for you; I simply posted my personal experience…..
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
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Boston
Consider physical fitness - if you're over working certain muscles, perhaps you may find benefit from strengthening your back and shoulder muscles.
 

danny_w

macrumors 601
Mar 8, 2005
4,380
158
Austin, TX
I have not tried acupuncture, but I do work at a desk and had sore shoulders a lot until my present job. I got an ergonomic evaluation by a company nurse and she had my desk lowered/chair adjusted; now everything is MUCH improved! Have you had such an evaluation, or do you know that your desk / chair height are optimal for you? Just a suggestion.
 

briannaharbor

macrumors member
Original poster
May 22, 2014
84
0
I have not tried acupuncture, but I do work at a desk and had sore shoulders a lot until my present job. I got an ergonomic evaluation by a company nurse and she had my desk lowered/chair adjusted; now everything is MUCH improved! Have you had such an evaluation, or do you know that your desk / chair height are optimal for you? Just a suggestion.
I understand. We don't really have a company nurse- we are a really young company, with just five of us in an office. Maybe some day down the road.
 

keysersoze

macrumors 68000
Jan 6, 2004
1,596
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NH
Hi,

I work at a desk, typing most of the day...
What part of your shoulders hurt? A specific muscle group descriptor would be helpful.

In any event, an ergonomics assessment would be a good way to go, if your employer provides it. If you don't have access to one, Google 'how to avoid neck/shoulder pain at work'.

A good chair, learning to sit correctly, taking frequent breaks and some easy exercises would probably help.
 

briannaharbor

macrumors member
Original poster
May 22, 2014
84
0
What part of your shoulders hurt? A specific muscle group descriptor would be helpful.

In any event, an ergonomics assessment would be a good way to go, if your employer provides it. If you don't have access to one, Google 'how to avoid neck/shoulder pain at work'.

A good chair, learning to sit correctly, taking frequent breaks and some easy exercises would probably help.
I'm going over some of the office ergonomics now. Perhaps this will help, as I probably don't have the best posture.. The pain is like from my neck to mid-shoulder. I adjusted my chair, so we'll see if that works
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
5,503
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An Island in the Salish Sea
I understand. We don't really have a company nurse- we are a really young company, with just five of us in an office. Maybe some day down the road.
There is a lot of good information on the net.. for free.

Here is an Australian site about the ergonomics of sitting at a desk, with diagrams and everything.. including recommendations (near the bottom of the page) on how often to take breaks.

If you are merely treating the symptoms then you may be doing permanent damage. The best thing is to not create the sore shoulders in the first place.

Then… you should get your office organized into some sort of group health plan so that massages etc are covered.

imho only of course
 

danny_w

macrumors 601
Mar 8, 2005
4,380
158
Austin, TX
All good advice. There is a lot of information on the 'net on this subject so a nurse is not needed. It is important that your chair be adjusted correctly (feet flat, arms comfortable) and that the desk height be roughly level with your arms. In my case they lowered the desk to 26" (most desks are 28-29") and this made a world of difference. You can use a keyboard drawer underneath the desk to achieve a similar height, but I have never liked them. Also a lot of engineers at my job have desks that are adjustable from sitting to standing, and will vary the desk level during the day.
 

briannaharbor

macrumors member
Original poster
May 22, 2014
84
0
All good advice. There is a lot of information on the 'net on this subject so a nurse is not needed. It is important that your chair be adjusted correctly (feet flat, arms comfortable) and that the desk height be roughly level with your arms. In my case they lowered the desk to 26" (most desks are 28-29") and this made a world of difference. You can use a keyboard drawer underneath the desk to achieve a similar height, but I have never liked them. Also a lot of engineers at my job have desks that are adjustable from sitting to standing, and will vary the desk level during the day.
I've adjusted the seat for now, I can't adjust the desk, but its a start.
I use a laptop, so I can't put the keyboard on that keyboard shelf thing, but that's a good idea :)
 

chown33

Moderator
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Aug 9, 2009
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See a physical therapist. You might need to see a doctor first and get a referral.

A good physical therapist will evaluate you, your work equipment, and give you exercises specifically intended to strengthen the right muscles. Get one that specializes in RSI, if possible; they're more aware of workplace stuff.

Basicaly, go to a professional, otherwise you're just shooting in the dark.
 

heehee

macrumors 68020
Jul 31, 2006
2,468
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Same country as Santa Claus
See a physical therapist. You might need to see a doctor first and get a referral.

A good physical therapist will evaluate you, your work equipment, and give you exercises specifically intended to strengthen the right muscles. Get one that specializes in RSI, if possible; they're more aware of workplace stuff.

Basicaly, go to a professional, otherwise you're just shooting in the dark.
What he said.

Massages and acupuncture works, but they are temporary fix. The problem is your posture and no amount of massages and acupuncture will fix your shoulder.
 
Last edited:

sviato

macrumors 68020
Oct 27, 2010
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HR 9038 A
My shoulders were hurting too at work but I lowered my arm rests and raised my chair and now my shoulders are relaxed and no longer hurt. Fix your posture and do some stretches in the morning/evening.
 

jlsm511

macrumors 6502
Feb 26, 2008
333
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KMIA
I like to stand every hour or so and stretch, take a little walk to get water or something, seems to help me avoid shoulder and back pains that I otherwise would get.
 

sdilley14

macrumors 65816
Feb 8, 2007
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Mesa, AZ
Likes others have said, it sounds like poor posture, and possibly weak shoulder/upper back/trap muscles. Work on your posture, get up and stretch/walk around every hour or so, and start working out and strengthening those weak areas. ;)
 

rhp2424

macrumors regular
Jul 23, 2008
118
10
Has anyone ever had acupuncture? Would that help? I dont know why, but it looks really therapeutic.
A good acupuncturist will be able to really provide some relief. As others have said, the pain, while it will provide some relief, will ultimately only continue so long as the bad posture/setup continue. I speak from experience though, find yourself a good acupuncturist and you may well find some levels of relief, even to just enjoy the every now and again experience of acupuncture.
 

Mousse

macrumors 68020
Apr 7, 2008
2,145
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Flea Bottom, King's Landing
I'm going over some of the office ergonomics now. Perhaps this will help, as I probably don't have the best posture.. The pain is like from my neck to mid-shoulder. I adjusted my chair, so we'll see if that works
If your posture is bad, then it might have bent you spine out of alignment. Years of being hunched over a computer keyboard inverted the curvature of my neck. A good Chiropractor can realign your spine, but until you fix your posture the problem will come back.
 

satcomer

macrumors 604
Feb 19, 2008
6,751
1,115
The Finger Lakes Region
Hi,

I work at a desk, typing most of the day, which often makes my shoulders get sore. I get massages monthly, but I don't think they're helping the problem, only delaying it for a while. Has anyone ever had acupuncture? Would that help? I dont know why, but it looks really therapeutic.

If anyone else has any suggestions, I'm open.
Yes. Start off of doing push-ups starting small numbers while over time increasing the count. Consider putting the push-ups in your morning routine and this will help make your shoulders will get some good strength training to relieve these pains.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
5,503
87
An Island in the Salish Sea
Or.... invest in a super computer that understands human speech and just dictate to it all day. Then no typing, and no shoulder pains!

Seriously... if you can't find a solution that doesn't cause injury, it may be time to look for a new job. You appear to be not adequately insured for medical issues (reading between the lines about how little help you can access currently). To bork up your shoulders permanently and prematurely will not only put you out of job anyway - it will also either cause you great financial or physical stress. Or both. Fixing shoulders is tough. I have a bad one, and I'm in the early phases of dealing with it. So take care of your health. It's important.
 
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