My Theory on Apple's release cycle

Discussion in 'macOS' started by alexcanton, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. alexcanton, Mar 15, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013

    alexcanton macrumors member

    alexcanton

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Location:
    Gold Coast, AU
    #1
    It's interesting, 2013 seems to be Apple's year for software.

    For example:


    2010
    - Major Hardware: iPad, iPhone 4, iPod touch with FaceTime, Multi-Touch iPod Nano
    - Minor Software: iOS 4

    2011
    - Minor Hardware: iPhone 4S, iPad 2
    - Major Software: OS X Lion, iOS 5, iCloud

    2012
    - Major Hardware: iPhone 5, iPad Mini, Macbook Pro with Retina, Redesigned iMac
    - Minor Software: iOS 6, OS X Mountain Lion


    2013
    - Minor Hardware: iPhone 5S, iPad (5th Generation)
    - Major Software: iOS 7, OS X 10.9


    2014
    - Major Hardware: The next iPhone, iPad 6, iTV
    - Minor Software: iOS 8, OS 11.0




    Let me know your thoughts. Do you agree/disagree with my theory?
     
  2. benwiggy macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2012
    #2
    To be honest, I doubt that even Apple give it as much thought as you have.:p

    In what way is OS X 10.8 and 10.6 "Minor software", but 10.7 "Major"? :confused:
    Advice on the basis of patterns seems to be that the even numbered released are better than the odd ones.

    2012 is expected to be the year that the new MacPro is released. So pretty major, I'd say.

    Apple has changed its release cycle for OS X, which will now be annual for major versions. This was announced when Lion came out, I think.

    Sadly, from comment made by Apple Engineers in the Apple BugReporter, this now means that many bugs introduced in a major release won't get fixed within the life of the same version -- you will have to purchase an upgrade to get the bug fix.
    While this previously happened a bit, we can expect to see more of this, given the shorter release cycles.
     
  3. alexcanton, Mar 15, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013

    alexcanton thread starter macrumors member

    alexcanton

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Location:
    Gold Coast, AU
    #3
    It's pretty obvious isn't it?


    Leopard was a fresh OS

    Snow Leopard was a refinement

    "Mac OS X Snow Leopard is intended to be a release aimed to refine the existing feature set, expand the technological capabilities of the operating system, and improve application efficiency."




    Lion was a fresh OS

    Mountain Lion was a refinement

    "Named to signify its status as a refinement of the previous OS X version, Lion."
     
  4. marvz macrumors 6502a

    marvz

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Location:
    Berlin
    #4
    It isn't true that after a 10.9 software there have to be an 11.0 update...
    There can be 10.10, 10.11, 10.12, etc.
     
  5. Giuly, Mar 15, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013

    Giuly macrumors 68040

    Giuly

    #5
    As you might have noticed, they just call it 'OS X Mountain Lion' now, so the 10.x is A) redundant as X=10, and B) deprecated.

    It would be OS XI – and that's not going to happen, unless you have some breakthrough ideas that are better than an open-source UNIX with a proprietary desktop environment. 25 years ago, SJ hadn't when NeXT developed it. 25 years later, no one else has, either. Except for the Cloud, but that's another matter.
     
  6. alexcanton thread starter macrumors member

    alexcanton

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    Gold Coast, AU
    #6
    Lol, are you serious?
     
  7. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #7
    Why not? The next release after 10.9 is indeed likely to be 10.10.
     
  8. tekno macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    #8
    I think (hope) Apple would probably adjust their hardware/software release schedule depending on market conditions, competition, sales figures, product readiness etc. rather than this pattern alone.

    Plus, after OS X 10.9 would come 10.10. Unless the update is so major to warrant OS X 11.0.
     
  9. FSMBP macrumors 68020

    FSMBP

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    #9

    Your cycle is off. Leopard was released in 2007. Snow Leopard was in 2009.
     
  10. alexcanton, Mar 15, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013

    alexcanton thread starter macrumors member

    alexcanton

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Gold Coast, AU
    #10
    Okay so maybe it didn't apply back then, but Apple didn't have a release cycle as vast as they do now. Now they release an OS every year. They have iPad and iPad Mini ect.

    Mac OS 9 was released in 1999. Im almost certain OS 11 would be released in 2014. 15 years after Mac OS 9.

    I highly doubt it will be 10.10, that doesn't make sense.
     
  11. Tmelon macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    #11
    In terms of decimals 10.10 doesn't make sense, but in terms of software version numbering it does. When ever OS X 11 (OS XI?) comes out it will probably be a major change and from the looks of things I doubt Apple has been putting enough time into that for a release next year.
     
  12. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #12
    Major and minor is a subjective term and should be dismissed.

    What about iWatch? That's gotta be by 2014. Also, I feel a breakthrough in the tablet/desktop OS has to happen soon. Microsoft has given it a shot with Win8 and it seems it's mixed on the reception. Perhaps Apple can do it right?

    If OS 11 is coming, I feel it will be the OS that bridges iOS and Mac OS. We all have seen the similarities already occurring so it's only a matter of time before a true hybrid OS appears.

    Hardware will come and go based on what supplies create, but at the moment the mobile hardware is where most big changes are likely to occur.
     
  13. alexcanton thread starter macrumors member

    alexcanton

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Location:
    Gold Coast, AU
    #13
    There is so much wrong with that post:
    • Major and Minor are obviously used. Look at Leopard, Snow Leopard. Lion, Mountain Lion.
    • iWatch is absolute speculation, nothing solid at all.
    • Windows 8 was such a flop people are going back to Windows 7. Apple has learnt from that, that a hybrid OS will not be happening for a long time. Hence why Apple hasn't made touch screen iMacs/Macbooks. They researched it, it doesn't work.
     
  14. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #14
    Ha, minor and major is all based on whoever is using the terms. Snow Leopard was way better than Leopard was, so not sure how you could call that minor. Same with Lion and ML (actually on this one I really notice virtually no difference).
    See? My definition of major and minor is different than yours. Subjective. Though I agree that the rMBP and new iMac were major-ish.

    The iWatch is speculative but when the WSJ posts about it it is at least being explored. It should be lumped in as a major release in the "speculative" list you compiled.

    Apple has learned from Win8? This doesn't even make sense. Apple is absolutely moving towards a hybrid OS, but they are taking their time on it as opposed to MS jumping the gun trying to get ahead in the game (they haven't).
     
  15. alexcanton thread starter macrumors member

    alexcanton

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Location:
    Gold Coast, AU
    #15
    How should it be in the speculative list? It is a very very new rumour. Everything else is pretty solid and has been speculated for years.

    Apple learned a heap. OS X is bringing a few features across from iOS because of iCloud, I wouldn't say thats moving to a hybrid OS at all. It's simply sharing some great functionality across a mobile operating system.

    Windows 8 however merged everything what so ever, with no dividing line. And did that work? No. Because some things are meant for touch and some things aren't. Hence iOS and OS X
     

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