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Nanoleaf, the company behind a line of designer energy-efficient light bulbs, today announced its latest product, the Nanoleaf Smarter Kit. The Nanoleaf Smarter Kit, which is debuting today on Indiegogo, is the first Nanoleaf product to include HomeKit support.

Through HomeKit, iPhone users with the Nanoleaf Smarter Kit will be able to control their lightbulbs with voice commands, turning them on and off and incorporating them into scenes with other HomeKit-enabled products through the accompanying Nanoleaf Smarter iOS app. The kit is also compatible with other connected smart bulbs such as the Philips Hue line.


The Nanoleaf Smarter Kit ships with one Nanoleaf hub and two energy efficient Nanoleaf Ivy light bulbs. The Nanoleaf Hub connects to a router to provide a way for an iPhone to connect wirelessly to the Nanoleaf bulbs. Each of the 3000K warm white bulbs measures in at 800 lumens, drawing 7 watts of power and putting out an amount of light equivalent to a 60 watt bulb.

These bulbs also have a unique design that lets them be used sans lampshade and with a range of decorative open-faced lamps. They're made from printed circuit boards embedded with LED chips and and folded into a dodecahedron shape.

The Nanoleaf Smarter Kit can be purchased via Indiegogo or the Nanoleaf website for $99. The kit will ship out to customers beginning on November 26.

Article Link: Nanoleaf Debuts New HomeKit-Enabled Smarter Kit With Two Light Bulbs and a Hub
 

2457282

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Dec 6, 2012
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I have LED lights that are dimmable, but not programmable. I have Hue Lights that are dimmable, programmable and in color. The one thing that I like about the ones I have is that they look like light bulbs and I can fit lampshades over them (you know, the kind that secure themselves directly to the light bulb). These look odd and I wonder how the shades will fit them. I do like the Siri integration however.
 

rdlink

macrumors 68040
Nov 10, 2007
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"These bulbs also have a unique design that lets them be used sans lampshade and with a range of decorative open-faced lamps. They're made from printed circuit boards embedded with LED chips and and folded into a dodecahedron shape."

Entire paragraph could have been shortened to: "These bulbs are butt ugly."
 

wlossw

macrumors 65816
May 9, 2012
1,079
1,012
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Why are bright whites and day lights so hard to find? I can't flipping see with soft whites.

Not willing to pay for Phillips Hue either.

I have the opposite problem even 2700k is too cool... All the leds I have found are way too cool for around-the-house-wife-approval (I swear she would light the whole house with candle light)... The home depot here in Canada has the best in store selection I have found...
 
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AngerDanger

macrumors 603
Dec 9, 2008
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That design looks vaguely familiar…

74a415e105c0f0ea.jpg
 

ayale99

macrumors 6502
Dec 6, 2007
345
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Hey HomeKit accessory manufacturers, we're all good on the plethora of lightbulb options. Would you please get around to other useful things like HomeKit enabled outlets, switches, security sensors, smoke detectors, garage door openers (looking at you Chamberlain), etc.
 

AbSoluTc

macrumors 601
Sep 21, 2008
4,570
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The last thing we need is another light bulb option. We already have a TON of them and they actually look good. How are these the first dimmable bulbs? Do they know what first means? Have they heard of HUE? Who designed these things? They look terrible and the marketing makes it seem like this is a worlds FIRST! Which it's not.

Ugh. Choice is cool but how about some other things. Sensors? A home kit enable door lock that actually ****ing works?
 
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Jakexb

macrumors 6502a
Mar 18, 2014
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Are there easy ways to hook up these types of HomeKit lights to a physical switch also? I can't imagine having to get out my phone every time I walk into a room and either open an app or talk to Siri. Or if I get home and my battery is dead and I have to feel my way to the charger and sit there in darkness until the phone boots up.
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,818
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Redondo Beach, California
I have LED lights that are dimmable, but not programmable. I have Hue Lights that are dimmable, programmable and in color. The one thing that I like about the ones I have is that they look like light bulbs and I can fit lampshades over them (you know, the kind that secure themselves directly to the light bulb). These look odd and I wonder how the shades will fit them. I do like the Siri integration however.


Edison base (screw-in) LED lights are kind of a transitional thing. Newer LED fixtures don't have replaceable light bulbs. There is not buch reason to make the bulb user changeable if it really does last 25 years. I'm remodeling a house and have put in mostly these newer kinds using only a few screw-in LEDs.
 

2457282

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Are there easy ways to hook up these types of HomeKit lights to a physical switch also? I can't imagine having to get out my phone every time I walk into a room and either open an app or talk to Siri. Or if I get home and my battery is dead and I have to feel my way to the charger and sit there in darkness until the phone boots up.
I have Hue bulbs. The wall switch is always on and I control them through the ipad/iphone/watch. However, if none of those are available I simply turn the switch off and on again. In other words, they work like a normal light if you can't use the app. They also sell Hue switches that you can mount on the wall that will do the same thing.

In other words, they have thought this through and there are options (at least for Hue).
 

avanpelt

macrumors 68030
Jun 2, 2010
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HomeKit is such a mess. I thought one of the big points with HomeKit-enabled devices was, as someone mentioned earlier, you weren't going to need to fill your house with hubs because the HomeKit-enabled devices would talk to the Apple TV over Wi-Fi instead. Meanwhile, Apple is releasing a brand new Apple TV this week and as far as I can recall, there was precisely zero mention of HomeKit in the keynote where the new Apple TV was introduced.

If Apple is going to play in the connected home space, they either need to get their act together and go all in or get out of the game entirely.

Edit: After reading Apple's HomeKit page, it appears that the Apple TV is only used to allow control of HomeKit devices with Siri when the user is not on the home network. I think Apple has totally missed the boat with the current implementation of HomeKit. So each of these brands of devices still needs their own hub, and if you have Apple TV, you can still control the devices with Siri when you're away from your house. It's just a kludgy setup.

Normally, Apple simplifies the things they decide to touch and in most cases, Apple makes those things better and more reliable in the process. In this case, however, Apple seems to have just added more clutter, confusion, and instability to an area that already had a tendency to suffer those shortcomings.
 
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NightFox

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May 10, 2005
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Shropshire, UK
One of the biggest points about HomeKit is that it doesn't need a hub. Everything should be able to connect to wifi and work in that way.

Agree, but in some cases I think it's actually advantageous to have a hub, particularly where you're dealing something that consists of multiple devices (e.g. lighting and lightbulbs) - without a hub if HomeKit develops in the future beyond the spec of the devices, you only need to replace the hub rather than the individual devices. Philips Hue is a good example of this - its new HomeKit compatability can be achieved just by replacing the hub, existing owners don't have to replace every bulb as they would have had to do if the system wasn't centralised.
 

RMo

macrumors 65816
Aug 7, 2007
1,225
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Iowa, USA
I've invested a lot into the "smart light" concept in my home, mostly with Philips Hue, so I feel the need comment on some things below. :)

How are these the first dimmable bulbs? Do they know what first means? Have they heard of HUE? Who designed these things? They look terrible and the marketing makes it seem like this is a worlds FIRST!

They aren't the first dimmable LED bulb--some are dimmable via a dimmer switch, others are dimmable via software (e.g., Hue). This, however, is the first that is dimmable via either.* Obviously you won't be able to make them brighter via software than your dimmer switch is set to, but at least it allows you to still use them like regular bulbs in every way. So they are "first" in that sense.

*I think. I know they say it's like the Nanoleaf Bloom, which I think actually has a funny way of being dimmed with only a regular wall switch if you flick it on and off the right way. (Probably the first to dim without software or special hardware.) I'm not sure if it actually dims with regular dimmers.

Are there easy ways to hook up these types of HomeKit lights to a physical switch also? I can't imagine having to get out my phone every time I walk into a room and either open an app or talk to Siri. Or if I get home and my battery is dead and I have to feel my way to the charger and sit there in darkness until the phone boots up.

Yes, in multiple ways. You can always use your existing switches to turn the bulbs on and off, but you can also turn them on and off via software as long as the wall switch is kept on (obviously, otherwise the bulbs would have no power to turn on). Hue will also reset the bulbs to their default color and brightness if power is lost, which means you can just flip your switch off and on if you turned them off via software but don't have your phone and want to turn them on via hardware instead. You can also replace your existing switches with Z-Wave or similar switches and integrate them with Hue via SmartThings (or Vera, etc.--or not and just control them separately with a similar caveat to a regular power-off). As others have mentioned, Philips also makes a line of switches: Tap (set scenes or turn off lights with four buttons) and Dimmer (on/off and dimming control for at least the Hue White bulb, doesn't seem to be in stock at many places yet and I'm not sure it works with the "regular"/"White and color" bulbs).

One of the biggest points about HomeKit is that it doesn't need a hub. Everything should be able to connect to wifi and work in that way.

I think there are actually some advantages to making light bulbs work this way. First, for bulbs to work with WiFi, you'd need good enough signal at all your light fixtures. This may be unlikely on the fringes of your house. Hue (and probably this new Nanoleaf product if it's compatible) uses ZigBee, which is a mesh network, and bulbs can relay signals to other bulbs, sort of extending your range. It is also a much lower-power technology than WiFi, so standby power for Hue is, I think <0.5 W (I think WeMo devices [non-lights] were about 3x that when I measured last--but even they switched to a mesh network for their bulbs). LIFX uses WiFi and a mesh network--one of the bulbs connects via WiFi and has a sort of "built-in bridge," and the rest use the mesh network. The disadvantage is that, as each bulb needs to have this capability (even if unused), the cost per bulb seems to be higher, and historically their power consumption was also greater, though their newest bulb brought that down a bit.
 
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mikecorp

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I would love to buy a bulb like that. but Why nobody design a lamp that would have much smaller fittings. E27 is way to large and unnecessary.
Hub is useless. I do have Philips Hue and it has issues sometimes.
 

KALLT

macrumors 603
Sep 23, 2008
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I would love to buy a bulb like that. but Why nobody design a lamp that would have much smaller fittings. E27 is way to large and unnecessary.

Good question. They do show pictures of desk lamps, but all of mine have an E14 fitting. Generally, I wonder whether these bulbs are any good. A quick scan of their Kickstarter page suggested that they had quite a bit of manufacturing problems at first. I've already bought many LED bulbs for my home, so there is no reason to buy them anyway.
 

rdlink

macrumors 68040
Nov 10, 2007
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HomeKit is such a mess. I thought one of the big points with HomeKit-enabled devices was, as someone mentioned earlier, you weren't going to need to fill your house with hubs because the HomeKit-enabled devices would talk to the Apple TV over Wi-Fi instead. Meanwhile, Apple is releasing a brand new Apple TV this week and as far as I can recall, there was precisely zero mention of HomeKit in the keynote where the new Apple TV was introduced.

If Apple is going to play in the connected home space, they either need to get their act together and go all in or get out of the game entirely.

Edit: After reading Apple's HomeKit page, it appears that the Apple TV is only used to allow control of HomeKit devices with Siri when the user is not on the home network. I think Apple has totally missed the boat with the current implementation of HomeKit. So each of these brands of devices still needs their own hub, and if you have Apple TV, you can still control the devices with Siri when you're away from your house. It's just a kludgy setup.

Normally, Apple simplifies the things they decide to touch and in most cases, Apple makes those things better and more reliable in the process. In this case, however, Apple seems to have just added more clutter, confusion, and instability to an area that already had a tendency to suffer those shortcomings.

It's still early, and I think you're being a little hard on HomeKit. The bottom line is that any device that hooks up to HomeKit will need to be connected to your WiFi network. It makes little sense to have every bulb in the house be its own WiFi node, for many reasons. First there would be costs associated with it. Second, the power consumption of having to keep an always on WiFi connection on a light bulb would negate any power saving benefit of using LEDs.

Perhaps if Apple had developed a single HomeKit hub, and said that any device that wants to work with HomeKit needs to be able to talk to it. The Apple TV seems like a logical choice for that. And who knows? That may still be where Apple is headed. They were very stringent about the Hardware necessary for HomeKit enabled hubs and devices. So perhaps that puts them in a position where devices will be able to talk to a single Apple branded hub at some point.
 

OldSchoolMacGuy

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Jul 10, 2008
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Agree, but in some cases I think it's actually advantageous to have a hub, particularly where you're dealing something that consists of multiple devices (e.g. lighting and lightbulbs) - without a hub if HomeKit develops in the future beyond the spec of the devices, you only need to replace the hub rather than the individual devices. Philips Hue is a good example of this - its new HomeKit compatability can be achieved just by replacing the hub, existing owners don't have to replace every bulb as they would have had to do if the system wasn't centralised.

If all devices simply connect to wifi instead of the hub, then in the future there's never a need for a hub and never a need to replace the hub with a new one.

HomeKit also limits the available functionality for any device that makes use of a hub and only bridges some of the functions, though doesn't allow full integration.
 

mw360

macrumors 68000
Aug 15, 2010
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One of the biggest points about HomeKit is that it doesn't need a hub. Everything should be able to connect to wifi and work in that way.

No.
If all devices simply connect to wifi instead of the hub, then in the future there's never a need for a hub and never a need to replace the hub with a new one.

I would have thought when Phillips updated their hub to HomeKit, you no-hubbers would have finally got it. Without the hub yes, we wouldn't have had to replace it at a cost of about $30. Instead we would have had to replace all our bulbs at $60 each.

The bulbs are supposed to last 20 years (we'll see), but no WiFi standard will last that long, and certainly no Apple standard will last that long. Keep the bulbs as simple as they can possibly be, and let some cheap hub handle the communication with the complex stuff.
 
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v3rlon

macrumors 6502a
Sep 19, 2014
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Not seeing a big selling point to this light versus other options out there. Hue has colors. There are other brands that have price. This has "Looks like a prop from a direct to DVD horror movie." Maybe there's a market for that.

Like others, I want to see something more impressive from home kit. The Amazon Echo is closer to a good start.
Voice control lights "Hey, Siri, set lights to movie night"
Add in Honeywell/Nest "Hey Siri, drop the temperature 5 degrees"
Doors "Hey Siri, lock up." or "We're going out" (which locks the doors and sets thermostat to away).
Add in play music, movies, and TV on Apple TV and answer all the questions we love to ask Siri.

Maybe useful notifications "Excuse me, but the dog has just left the yard. Would you like me to track him?"
 

TurboPGT!

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One of the biggest points about HomeKit is that it doesn't need a hub. Everything should be able to connect to wifi and work in that way.
No, that was one of the biggest fantasies about HomeKit before it was announced.

People immediately assumed that because the AppleTV was involved in some way, that this meant the AppleTV would suddenly become the universal smart hub for every different smart home appliance.

As good of an idea as that was in theory, smart devices are no where near standardized enough to be able to do that.
 

OldSchoolMacGuy

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No, that was one of the biggest fantasies about HomeKit before it was announced.

People immediately assumed that because the AppleTV was involved in some way, that this meant the AppleTV would suddenly become the universal smart hub for every different smart home appliance.

As good of an idea as that was in theory, smart devices are no where near standardized enough to be able to do that.

Wat? The entire purpose of HomeKit as laid out by Apple within their development docs is to be a hubless home management system. That's exactly what Apple intends it to be and why they limit functionality to those that choose to use hubs.
 
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