Need help from runners

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by furryrabidbunny, Nov 12, 2007.

  1. furryrabidbunny macrumors 6502

    furryrabidbunny

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    #1
    I have really bad shine splints again... wouldn't be too bad but I have a physical fitness test wednesday for my job. The test is participation only but I dont' want to be shown up by the old guys.

    I could only pull a mile today before calling uncle and quitting. Does anyone have a quick fix (not looking for long term, just want to be able to do 1.5 miles wednesday in under 12 without pain).
     
  2. Feverish Flux macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    #2
    Ice, ice and more ice along with anti-inflammatory meds (Advil, etc.).

    Shin splints are usually an indicator of overtraining.

    Try and get the swelling down by icing and you may be able to do what you want. The only really way to "cure" them is to ease off on the running. They sometimes take quite a while to heal.
     
  3. Shaduu macrumors 6502a

    Shaduu

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    #3
    I can only repeat the need for ice on shin splints. For such a simple recovery tool it works wonders.
     
  4. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #4
    good advice here. you might want to take an ice-bath instead of just putting ice on it. it works much better
     
  5. Phat Elvis macrumors 6502

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    #5
    I agree with the ice.

    To train (after your test) without stressing your legs try running in a pool. Buy a vest to float and then run in place. It's non-impact and you get the same workout - just not as good a view.
     
  6. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

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    #6
    Sounds like you might need new shoes or to rethink how tightly you currently tie your shoes. Shin splints can sometimes be caused by poorly fitting shoes.
     
  7. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #7
    that is true, but i don't think he would have them as bad as he's describing from just old shoes or tightly tied shoes. he might be pronating also
     
  8. xsedrinam macrumors 601

    xsedrinam

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    Oct 21, 2004
    #8
    Ice, shoes, rest are all good suggestions to check out. You also may need to check your running form that you're not leaning forward or are too much up on your toes with your foot plant. If you're talking a 8 min. mile, that's certainly not too demanding of a pace, but form is important, regardless.
     
  9. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #9
    No, I think the Jew is right. I had to stop running for months because I switched away from New Balance and bought a pair of Nikes. I got shin splints, didn't know what caused, and spent months figuring it out. Was it my form? Oh yes, it must be my form. Wrong!. I took 2 months off running, began running again for 3 weeks, and my shin started hurting again. Then I bought a new pair of New Balance, and everything was fine. :)

    Now I have a knee problem, and I haven't run in 4 months. I stopped running, then bought new shoes with a bit more padding, and thought it would work out. It did for around 2 weeks, and my knee still hurts. I couldn't find any New Balance (my favourite brand) that was right for me, so I took a risk and bought a pair of Brooks "The Beast". Fab shoes if you like cushioning. However, my knee pain persists, so this time, I'm quite sure it's my form. It's probably related to a bad ski accident I had years ago. Every time I get any weird feeling in my leg, it's probably my right leg. :eek:
     
  10. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #10
    well everybody's different. i've ran in tons of different shoes, including tons of different brands. i've had my share of injuries, but no shoe has made my leg hurt so bad i couldn't run, yet if i switched shoes, i could go and run that day.

    i just don't think those magical shoes you speak of exist, and i think you found that out also
     
  11. EMU1337 macrumors member

    EMU1337

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    Nov 2, 2007
    #11
    I found that when I was trying to get back into running, that running on softer surfaces like grass, or dirt is easier on your shins than running on asphalt. This should help you transition into running longer distances on harder surfaces.
     
  12. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #12
    this is correct. but i think the OP said he was only trying to run 1.5 miles in 12 minutes, or something like that
     
  13. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #13
    Twoodcc, you might have a decent stride and form to start with, so you don't have to rely on the shoes to offset any weaknesses.

    I have to agree with Abstract, I had recurring ankle issues when i was running in a pair of Adidas. I spent months trying to figure it out; was it from rugby? The treadmill? Switching from treadmill to ground? When I switched to New Balance shoes my ankle stopped aching 10 minutes into my runs immediately. I figured out the Adidas were too loose on my heel and it caused my ankle to get rolled and twisted funny. New Balance were a better fit. (Also rugby cleats, but you look and sound funny running down the sidewalk in those.)

    While it might not be the whole cause, if you have any weird stride/form issues or specific foot needs, your entire run can change based on the shoe. The OP should apply ice liberally, take ibuprofen the day he's running, and try to get better shoes and new socks.
     
  14. devilot Moderator emeritus

    devilot

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    May 1, 2005
    #14
    Hm. Mebbe I didn't read carefully enough, but I'm shocked no one mentioned tape?

    Taping up shins is one v temporary "fix" if you've still got more running to do. And if you know you're prone, than tape up before each work out.

    But yes, ice and anti-inflammatory meds will probably help, too.

    Don't let them get too out of hand though-- could turn into stress fractures. :eek:
     
  15. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #15
    yeah, compression can help. i've tried it before. it's no miracle though
     
  16. Plymouthbreezer macrumors 601

    Plymouthbreezer

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  17. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #17
    yep. and ice bath if you can, it's the best ;)
     
  18. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

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    #18
    Ice is good but it'll only help the symptoms, not the cause. I really think the shoes need to be looked at to prevent further pain and possible damage. :)
     
  19. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #19
    it's probably more to do with foot-strike (which is related to shoes, but more so running gate/form)
     
  20. xsedrinam macrumors 601

    xsedrinam

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    Oct 21, 2004
    #20
    Shoes have already been mentioned as a runner’s best worded friend when it comes to injury; “prevention”. Shin splints can be boiled down to two primary causes.

    Overload and biomechanical:

    Overload causes include:
    •Exercising on hard surfaces, like concrete;
    •Exercising on uneven ground;
    •Beginning an exercise program after a long lay-off period;
    •Increasing exercise intensity or duration too quickly;
    •Exercising in worn out or ill fitting shoes; and
    •Excessive uphill or downhill running.

    Biomechanical causes include:
    •Poor running mechanics;
    •Tight, stiff muscles in the lower leg;
    •Running with excessive forward lean;
    •Running with excessive backwards lean;
    •Landing on the balls of your foot; and
    •Running with your toes pointed outwards

    Check your shoes. Check your form. Check with a Podiatrist. Check your routine and routes. Check your rest. Some of us have long distance running experiences and advice to offer based on those experiences. Others may be shorter distance runners with the same, good advice. To the OP, I hope you are able to get to the problem, and thus the cure.
     
  21. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #21
    I never said my shoes made my legs hurt. Running in those Adidas for a long period of time resulted in shin splints (**I was wrong before when I said I ran in Nikes. I had switched from New Balance to a pair of Adidas). Switching back to New Balance that day wouldn't have helped, either. A combination of a LOT of down time, and switching shoes, helped.

    After I took a long rest, I started running again and found that the problem came back after 3-4 weeks. I wasn't particularly impressed, and I met some hard-core runner from California, and he suggested that I take another 2 weeks off and switch back to whatever brand of shoes I had before. Anyway, I stopped running (again) for another few weeks, bought new New Balance shoes, and things were perfect again for 2.5 years of constant running. ;)


    Again, I had no shin splints again for 2.5 years after resting, and going back to New Balance.

    However, this problem I have now involving my knee is definitely not a shoe-related problem. It's form, and possibly running on concrete for too long, and too intensely for me.
     
  22. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #22
    Yep, I understand you. I tried the same thing. ;) Actually, I never used to run on a treadmill, but when things started to feel really bad, I started running on a treadmill because I feel it's a more controlled running environment. I was trying to see if it was my form, but didn't find anything glaringly bad. I semi-regularly jogged with my friend, who was one of the fastest people in France (not at the time, but maybe 6 years before that time), and while he definitely saw things in my form, he couldn't see how any of that could have affected my leg so badly.

    I think New Balance is better for my flat footedness. They also fit me a bit better. The funny thing is that last time, I couldn't find a single pair of NBs that fit me well, and had to switch to Brooks in June. I also wanted something more padded, so I got "The Beast". They're great for people with (almost) no foot arch, although they are rather heavy shoes. :eek:
     
  23. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #23
    I can't sing the praises of New Balance enough. They are truly amazing shoes.
     
  24. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #24
    well based on what you just said, i'd say part of the problem is you either didn't take enough time off the first time, or when you did come back, you did too much too soon. and if you have flat feet, that can be a problem as well.

    anyways, it's funny that i'm talking about this, cuz my shin is starting to hurt a little (i've had a history of stress fractures). i have a higher pain tolerance than most, but i have to listen to my body. i think it's from taking a little time off, and then coming back too strong. hopefully this won't amount to anything
     

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