Need help knowing what to buy

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Rlanoue, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. Rlanoue macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2012
    #1
    I'm in the market for a laptop, and I'm wanting to switch from PC to Mac. I have an iPhone 4s and an iPad 2. It seems that the logical direction would be to go with Mac since I have Apple mobile devices.

    My main dilemma is that I'm trying to find something in the $500-$600 range, and that limits me a lot. What I'm looking for is, what do I need to know before making a purchase?

    Here's what I DO know:
    1. I need something with at least an intel core duo processor (is this the newest?)
    2. I'd like at least 2 GIGs of RAM.
    3. Hard Drive space needs to be around 300 Gigs.
    4. I need at least Lion to get all the benefits of iCloud and syncing all devices (is this correct?

    What else do I need to consider?

    thanks in advance for any help you all can provide!
     
  2. MaxPower72 macrumors 6502

    MaxPower72

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois, Crooks County
    #2
    Intel quad core i7 for 15" Macbook pro, the least RAM is 4GB smallest HD is 500 GB
    Intel dual core i7 for 13" Macbook pro the least RAM is 4GB smallest HD is 500 GB

    all new machines come with Mountain Lion that offers more iOS implementation than you'll ever want


    upgrade to aftermarket 8 or 16GB RAM and Solid State Drive up to 512 GB are convenient and recommended.
     
  3. Dark Void macrumors 68030

    Dark Void

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Cimmerian End
    #3
    Check eBay and be active with bids - $500-$600 is plenty for what you are looking for. I would shoot for a MacBook (white MacBook; has been discontinued) or an older MacBook Pro. It should meet most of your specifications, although I am not certain about needing OS X Lion for iCloud and syncing your devices.

    The newest processors used in Mac laptops are up to four cores - they are i5 and i7 models. The Core Duo and Core 2 Duo processors are old technology but they still hold up well today, depending on your usage of course.
     

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