Need IE help, client not happy about results in IE

Discussion in 'Web Design and Development' started by Dane D., Jan 27, 2009.

  1. Dane D. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    ohio
    #1
    Our ad agency was given the task of making this site - http://dandlenergy.com/index.html work in IE. We didn't design or produce this site. We have been asked to fix and maintain, they fired the original designer.

    It works fine in Camino, Firefox, iCab, Opera, Safari, SeaMonkey and Shiira. Plus I think this was made with CMS software. I'm stuck, only the home page doesn't work as far as I know.
     
  2. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #2
    What doesn't work exactly?

    Edit:
    I just pulled it up in IE on a windows box.
    The <![endif]--> tag is either just not working right or not opened and closed correctly. Also, sh*t isn't aligned on the menu bar. This looks like a layers deal. I think it may be best to rewrite it. If you click on "contact" the menu is suddenly aligned. What was used to write it? I am confused as I think CMS is content management system.
     
  3. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #3
    Step 1: Put a DOCTYPE on thae page. It helps with IE quirks mode.
    Step 2: Fix validation issues. One big issue,
    HTML:
      <param name="wmode" value="opaque"
    You see there's a missing > at the end.
    Step 3: See if that fixes things.

    Not to be mean, but if you don't know how to fix this type of stuff on your own, why did you accept the job?
     
  4. Dane D. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    ohio
    #4
    As I said, we didn't produce the site, but we do their business literature. Would you turn down a opportunity to get more work? If it weren't for IE, I wouldn't have asked the question. Seeing as they still have 60% market share, it seems like a good learning opportunity. Tips are helpful, arrogance isn't, many of us coming from a print background find web work frustrating, including myself. Thanks for the input.
     
  5. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    Yes, I would turn it down if I didn't know how to do the job. That's just good business sense. Otherwise you get a bad reputation for attempting to do something you don't know how to do. You may see my statement as arrogant, but I see it as a fact. If you find web stuff frustrating, don't accept web jobs. Stick to your print work.
     
  6. Dane D. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    ohio
    #6
    The thing is, we have done a number sites ranging from Drupal CMS to the old days of GoLive. Our sites work across the board, but this one is a different animal. Is there a "simple" fix or is the site crap and a total re-do is in order. I see your point, but life is boring if you don't take a challenge every now and than.
     
  7. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #7
    Have you tried my suggestions? The live site at least doesn't look like any of the changes have been made.
     
  8. SrWebDeveloper macrumors 68000

    SrWebDeveloper

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA, USA
    #8
    I've been following this and when I saw:

    That set of red flags in my head. Then I saw...

    From a professional perspective, as stated earlier by angelwatt it is indeed good business sense to turn a job down if you are wholly unqualified (general principle). Taking on a challenge is great, but based on how the OP represented themselves and missed the most obvious and standard debugging protocols this "challenge" seems to me to be an obvious mistake. That's when it costs money in the form of time -- all as a result of ignorance. And by ignorance, I don't mean to be condescending - the word actually means lack of knowledge. Simply that.

    I know this isn't tech talk, it's more about perspectives of business, but developers are no different than anyone else in terms of business ethics. I say don't "experiment" with other people's money and time unless they have plenty of both and even then, don't delay and seek help or bail out if you're in too deep. Never hesitate to do so, no matter the embarrassment - a client will respect you for it (and for legal reasons, best served). Maybe that's true in this case, the OP has an agreement and all the time in the world, but we all know it's not common nor sensible to do so - I'll give the benefit of the doubt this guy, however, for the record.

    But so many red flags are popping up I can't help but speak out - it troubled me as it did angelwatt.

    -jim
     
  9. dornoforpyros macrumors 68040

    dornoforpyros

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    #9
    It sounds to me like the account manager said "yes, we'd love to take control of your broken website that our competition did a poor job of" thinking that it would be an easy fix and easy money. And now the production people are stuck in this position that they were put in buy some one else not taking the time to check if they had the skills necessary to do so.

    My advice, get on the phone and higher a contractor that can fix this for you, you may lost money on this job, but the client will be happy with your agency again.
     
  10. Dane D. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    ohio
    #10
    Thats what happened, the acct. exec. brought this back after meeting with them.
    angelwatt, no I haven't tried your suggestions yet. I'm buried with work, will try soon.
     
  11. jordanste macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    #11
    the login page is spitting out all of this before the login form...
    PHP:
    Click Here to Register'); } while($info = mysql_fetch_array( $check )) { $_POST['pass'] = stripslashes($_POST['pass']); $info['password'] = stripslashes($info['password']); $_POST['pass'] = md5($_POST['pass']); //gives error if the password is wrong if ($_POST['pass'] != $info['password']) { die('Incorrect passwordplease try again.'); } else { // if login is ok then we add a cookie $_POST['username'] = stripslashes($_POST['username']); $hour = time() + 3600; setcookie(ID_my_site, $_POST['username'], $hour); setcookie(Key_my_site, $_POST['pass'], $hour); //then redirect them to the members area header("Location: members.php"); } } } else { // if they are not logged in ?>
    perhaps you are missing an opening php tag?

    also, it appears none of the pages on your site have declared doctypes. add that to the top of your page and this should help with some things...
     
  12. jakeOSX macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2005
    #12
    'view source' kinda made me want to cry.

    i see this: <!--> <![endif]-->

    seems that should be a comment, something like <!-- [endif] --> but i couldn't find a reason for it to exist. (granted i am pulling code from the browser, not from source)

    most things worked, the picture is off, however.

    i would removed the mouseovers and the flash. if that fixes it, you kwow where your issue is. if you don't (i suspect this is a CSS error) then you know where to start.

    also, it reported a javascript error on line 42, says object expected. sorry it wasn't more useful...

    edit: forgot something. if this is now your baby to maintain, take some advice from someone who got this dumped on them before... do it over. you know how they want it to look, start over (maybe not extirely from scratch) so you know the code and know how to maintain it.

    i still think it is a CSS error, btw. read up on how to work with CSS in IE, also check out the YUI (yahoo user interface) as they have notes and things on cross platform CSS.
     

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