Need job advice..

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by ApplePersonFreak, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. ApplePersonFreak macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2016
    #1
    I've recently started a new job and I'm about a month and a half in. Before this, I got let go from my previous job due to budget cuts and then I quit a few others before that. Basically I have done some job hopping, but I'm in a dilemma now where I don't want to job hop anymore, but I also don't know what I should do. I like it, however I feel like it's starting to take a toll on me. It's completely different from what I've done before, so I have to learn everything and adapt to it as well.

    I'm at the point now where I'm still in my probationary period, and I want to just hang in there and see where I go from there, but I'm also at that point where I just don't know if I have the motivation to keep going.. but if i don't then I'll have to job search AGAIN and it might take awhile to find another job and other employers will wonder why I've been job hopping so much. I've also heard that while you're in probationary period if you do decide to resign, it doesn't really "count" against you. Not sure if that's true.

    Anyways, I'm 24 and I just need advice on what to do from you guys out there. Did you have moments like this? What did you do to overcome them? I'm sitting here writing this with a feeling in my gut that I'm at this point where I don't know if I'm wanting to still do this, but if I don't then I don't have anything else to fall back on. Thanks!
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #2
    Before you ask questions of others - such as online here - you may need to ask a few questions of yourself.

    What did you enjoy studying at school/college?

    What do you like to do? What interests you? What engages you? What do you have a passion for?

    Have you liked any of the jobs you ever worked in? If so, what did you like about them - the company, the ambience, the actual work, the area the company worked in - what, if anything, did you like?

    And what, if anything, did you dislike? What are 'red lines' for you - must-haves and must-not-haves - in any job?
     
  3. fitshaced macrumors 68000

    fitshaced

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    #3
    Stick with what you're doing, ensure your boss is aware of your challenges and understands, focus on improving every day. You'll soon get comfortable with what you're doing. Once you get there, the pressure will be lifted and you can refocus on career planning. But you should try and keep the job you have first. You're 24 and more than young enough to sort out your situation.

    But it's also good that you want to fix it.
     
  4. Possumgal macrumors member

    Possumgal

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2015
    Location:
    N. Central Arkansas
    #4
    Any job takes learning and getting used to, even just switching companies within the same industry. Some take more than others. Employers know about and expect a little job hopping from teenagers, but you're getting to the age at which you should have gained a little endurance and practicality about the working world. Jumping ship might not land you in any better situation at the next job.

    Endurance and patience is something learned, and are valuable lessons. You'll never find the perfect job; if it was too enjoyable they might think they don't have to pay you. Stick to what you've got, for now, at least.
     
  5. ejb190 macrumors 65816

    ejb190

    #5
    When I first started the job I am in now, I asked one of my coworkers, "How long does it take until you feel like you know what your are doing with this job." His answer to me: "Ten years or so." I'm currently at eleven and feel he was about right.

    It might not take 10 years, but a month and a half is not enough to "master" any job, company system, or even really get to know the people you are working for and with. Hang on. You'll get there. There are parts of the job that are a challenge now that you will come to appreciate. And look out for what a friend of mine in the FBI called "play days" - those little things during the day that you look around and say, "They are paying me to do this?" Every job has them, if you look hard enough.
     

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