Need some tips for modeling photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Rickay726, Apr 11, 2010.

  1. Rickay726 macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    Dec 29, 2005
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #1
    hey guys

    so iv got an interview for a job coming up. its at a local modeling place in my mall called galmour shots, their hiring a photographer and want me to come in for a test shoot. i need to bring my own model and have her hair and make up done already. iv never really shot model photography before so is there any way some of you guys can offer me some tips on shooting models?

    thanks alot!
     
  2. Kebabselector macrumors 68030

    Kebabselector

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    #2
    Not done it before and trying to blag it for the interview. Personally I'd steer well clear of a paid job unless your competent.
     
  3. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    #3
    iv been photographing for over 4 years. i no what im doing this thread is aimed at professionals who could give me slight tips, not someone to come in here and shoot me down like that.
     
  4. gnd macrumors 6502a

    gnd

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    #4
    I'm not sure whether to be amused or depressed when people think so little of professional photography that they assume it can be done without any training or experience.

    Can you imagine this scenario with, say, a cardiac surgeon? For example:

    OP: Hi guys. I saw this ad for a cardiac surgeon, and I've got an interview for the job. I've never operated on anyone before, so could you please give me some tips.
    DUDE1: Well, first you'll need a real pro knife. Not just any knife will do.
    DUDE2: And it needs to be paired with some pro gloves. Gloves are important cuz they hold the knife.
    DUDE3: And remember not to leave the knife in there when you stitch them back up.
    DUDE1: Oh, and you should practice with different types of knives. See if you can find a relative to practice on.
    DUDE4: In the end it's not the knife, it's the person behind the knife.
    DUDE5: Don't charge money your first time. It's not right.
    DUDE1: When you're buying the knife, try out different ones to see which one feels right in your hand. Also consider renting a really good one for the interview.
    DUDE2: If you can't afford a good knife, consider getting a used one. Might want to clean it first, though.
    DUDE6: If you don't want to carry around a really big knife all the time, consider getting a pocketable one. The best knife is the one you have with you.
     
  5. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

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    #5
    Ah, so you "no" what your doing... Is there really someone offering you paid work?? :confused:
     
  6. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

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    #6
    What have you been photographing for 4 years?

    Have you ever used studio flash lighting before?
     
  7. CATinHAWAII macrumors member

    CATinHAWAII

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    --== Hawaii ! ==--
    #7
    Das da BEST ONE YET!!!

    wow! You nailed it!
    Anyway. Sounds like a young kid with a passion to shoot, and thinks it really ain't that hard,,, and it's not REALLY THAT HARD. once you know what you are doing,,,

    So. Yes, experience counts!

     
  8. toxic macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    #8
    if you know how to manipulate light and work with models, then you won't have a problem. if you don't, you won't learn how in a few days or weeks.
     
  9. GabooN macrumors regular

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    Mar 31, 2008
    Location:
    Windsor, Ontario
    #9
    wow, he was just asking for some tips... if they don't like his stuff they won't hire him so not sure why everyone is worried about him steering clear of paid photography jobs.
     
  10. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    Dec 29, 2005
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    New Jersey
    #10
    thanks.

    i was attending drexel for a photography in philadelphia they only accept about 30 kids from the world each year so i guess im doing something right. i no all my aperture to shutter speed ratios. i never said photography is easy, but then again it should never be compared to surgery this guy said. ha you people amaze me at how pathetic you are to rag on someone in a message board just looking for tips from pros. thanks for nothings
     
  11. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

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    #11
    Well, if you actually bothered to give some useful information about your background someone might actually be able to help you FFS!

    Have you ever used studio lighting before??
     
  12. pdxflint macrumors 68020

    pdxflint

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    Location:
    Oregon coast
    #12
    Here's a few tips: take a look at the kinds of shots they (your prospective employers) do...know the company you're applying with. Then read a few books on the subject of off-camera lighting. Check out some photographer websites that use interesting lighting techniques. If you're passionate about photography I shouldn't have to spoon feed you these websites since the internet is full of specific information if you look for it, but you could look at Joel Grimes site, click on "menu options," and check out his beauty/fashion section for ideas. He also has training materials available from his tutorials/workshop website, but they're generally not free. Maybe spend some time on the Strobist blog site, check out their tutorials and just generally look for information--there's plenty out there.

    And seriously, no offense meant here, but you have to really check the cute spelling at the door when dealing with people seriously. It just makes you seem like someone with a short attention span and more interested in drawing the wrong kind of attention to yourself... I'm not saying that describes the "real" you, because I don't know you-- only that it's the impression that comes across, so it would not help you in the professional world. Maybe limit that to social website where you're bantering with friends... totally different context. Anyway, you asked for some tips, so I hope they help. :)
     
  13. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

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    #13
    You're asking "pros" to tell you how to shoot with models. This isn't a "tip", it's a whole genre of photography!

    No-one's going to sit down in front of a computer and write down everything you need to know, in an online format. Not just for you. Fortunately, there are loads of books on the subject. Just head for the nearest library (while they still exist :()...
     
  14. El Cabong macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    #14
    I'm not a professional, but I know enough to understand that one doesn't go from "iv [sic] never really shot model photography before" to knowing enough to land a job doing so through a couple of "tips" randomly garnered from the Interweb. If you would actually answer firestarter's questions about what you've been shooting for 4 whole years and whether you've ever used studio lighting (kinda sorta important for studio photography), people here would be in a better position to offer you advice.

    People here would also be more inclined to offer you advice if you took the time to spell things - like the name of the place you want to work - properly. However, the main issue with your question is that you act as though studio photography is a simple thing that can be picked up on a whim; if you're in school for photography, you should appreciate that it takes experience and education (self-provided or otherwise) to do things properly with your camera. If not, then... why are you paying for school?
     
  15. Kebabselector macrumors 68030

    Kebabselector

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    #15
    I'm not trying to shoot you down, just passing on advice. If they do this for a living they'll find out you're a novice fast. Maybe come clean with them, they might take you on to mentor you.
     
  16. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    New Jersey
    #16
    They know that i have never shot studio photos before. The only real experience i have with lighting is with my 2 flashes and a wireless transmitter. They told me to bring my portfolio from school because they need a photographer asap. The manager also said that if I know what im doing with the camera they can help me with the lighting.
     
  17. pdxflint macrumors 68020

    pdxflint

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    #17
    From the sounds of it, they're pretty willing to train you, so I wouldn't worry too much about what we have to say, and just be really willing to learn how they do things. I'm sure there's probably some formulaic styles they use in their studio which are repeated, so that would be a good starting point. As long as you learn the lighting techniques, you can then practice on your own time to develop your own styles.

    The only other thing I might add concerning working with models... it's not the same necessarily as working with clients. Models usually are experienced being in front of the camera, and tend to be more relaxed while clients could be nervous and self-conscious. The most important thing, in my opinion, is learning how to be friendly and personable with your subjects. If you can make them relax and feel good about themselves, you'll get much better portraits. So, the 'people skills' are probably as important as the technical stuff.
     
  18. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

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    #18
    I agree with pdxflint... it's about talking to the person you're shooting, and telling them what you want.

    Given that you've been up front with them, and they've got a good idea of your skill level I wouldn't fret it too much. Obviously if you could get hold of a model before the interview and practice, that would be great.

    I think the most important thing for you to spend time on is to familiarise yourself with the genre, and get some ideas of poses etc. to shoot. Even if you don't know much about the lights, if you go in with a scrapbook of pictures that you like, you'll be able to work to achieve the correct lighting - and show the model what sort of pose you want them to take. Showing everyone that you're bringing ideas, enthusiasm and direction is bound to impress.
     
  19. Kebabselector macrumors 68030

    Kebabselector

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    Location:
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    #19
    Sounds not too bad then, good luck. Apologies for being a little harsh at the start, but with the initial info it didn't sound too good.

    You familiar with the strobist blog? Might be worth a look :) <-- noticed it was linked above!
     
  20. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    Dec 29, 2005
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    #20
    Thanks alot guys, this is all i was looking for!
     
  21. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #21
    It's a national franchise, and like the department store portrait places over here, they really aren't looking for talent- the lighting setups are generally pretty static and they end up with mostly button-pushers. From all I've seen and heard the biggest draw to these places is the makeup, most people aren't used to having portraits done with a decent makeup job. Their primary target market is teen girls and for quite a number of years they did really well with hair and makeup- though reviews on the Internet these days seem to show them falling down on that part too.

    It's certainly not like interning at a professional photographer's portrait studio unless the franchisee is actually a photographer who cares (but that's generally not the case, they're the low-end of the market in many shopping malls all over the US, but I don't think they have any stores outside the malls.) For a $250,000-300,000 investment, you too can own a Glamour Shots franchise- that includes "training," According to them, "Previous photography experience is not required."

    That's what I no ;)

    Paul
     
  22. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    Dec 29, 2005
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    New Jersey
    #22
    Hey guys, so i went yesterday for the interview. It was really cool they let me use my own camera and lens. Let me just say that working with my own private studio was awesome! Had 2 strobes to use and a normal back light. Along with many different back drops and props that i could use forever. The manager liked my shots and she knew this was my first time working in a studio and also working with the strobes. The F/s on my camera may have been off a little bit which made some of my shots look a tiny bit blueish. And i also shot in RAW which there programs could not handle, so we had to convert all my shots which was over 3gb. However the manager told me that i had alot of potential and to come back in on friday for another shoot with another model but they want me to use there shop camera i guess to make sure all the settings are perfect. i did however manage to get the shots home with me so ill update a few later today to see what you guys think! Once again thanks for the advice!
     
  23. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    Dec 29, 2005
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #25
    thank you thank you. I cant wait to get home from work and up load some of the shots to see what you guys think.
     

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