Needing Mac experience for dual platform software?

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by Nala, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. Nala macrumors newbie

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    #1
    I realize this is a pointless venture, nevertheless... I love it when searching for work and they post, "must be proficient in Mac-based programs like Photoshop and AfterEfffects." "Umm, but that stuff has been dual-platform since day one," I'd like to say, but I know it's never going to get through to them. I remember using Photoshop on PC's (and Macs) in the mid-nineties and there was no difference in the outcome. There are slight differences in key-commands and mouse use, but the functions are identical. If it's not generally known today,that Macs are identical to PC's for graphics work even 15 years later, it's just never going to. Where does that Mac-based assumption come from? Is it Mac-based arrogance/ignorance?:confused:
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #2
    Honestly I don't see the issue. If someone is well-versed on the Mac version of Photoshop (and OS X in general), they can concentrate more on doing their work instead of getting stuck on the minute differences between each version, which can add up in the long run.
     
  3. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #3
    What does your thread title have to do with the content of your post?


    I think the Mac based comment is made because the working environment is Mac based.

    I work on Avid Media Composer with two companies, one uses Windows as their platform, the other one uses Mac OS X.

    As they both differ, but not the software, the knowledge of the actual platform is one other key issue regarding employment.
     
  4. Nala thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #4
    @spinnerly. Heh, yeah I use Avid too, nowadays on PC, but I used it for years on Mac as well. Switching between programs or platforms is kinda unlike rocket science, more like riding 2 different bikes.
     
  5. Nala thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #5
    Huh? I understand moving (maybe burying) this thread to Special Interests/Apple, Industry, etc. from where I had posted it in "OSx" but why did you change the title? "Needing Mac experience for dual platform software." Sounds so industrial and impersonal. "Holy iCow, Batman!" was the original title that I made for it-- was my title offensive, or a forum violation? I'm even less sure what "needing Mac experience" has to do with the post. The "dual-platform" part is relevant, tho. I can't even figure our how to navigate to "Special Interests" on Macrumors:forums-- it's like more buried than than the trashed "Wasteland" stuff, no?

    Maybe this is why people don't come back after pointing out a Mac superiority issue cliche. Hmm.
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #6
    From Forum Rules:
    Also:
    Picture 1.JPG
     
  7. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

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    #7
    Well don't say it.

    Photoshop started out on the Mac.

    Photoshop 1.0 was released in 1990 for Macintosh exclusively. A Windows version of Photoshop was introduced in November 1992.

    Born on a Mac, baby. ;)

    Same for AfterEffects. Released for Mac in 1993. Windows version came in 1997.


    [​IMG]
     
  8. Nala thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #8
    OK I see, thanks.

    Photoshop getting introduced to PC's in 1992 should still be old news, like 18 years old, so why is still now nearly 2 decades on referred to as "Mac-based" Like saying "Telephone, the Bell-based comunicator."
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #9
    Perhaps because they have Macs in their office and prefer those with specifically Mac experience?
     
  10. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #10
    Mac-based refers to the platform the company uses if it is stated in a job ad.

    Windows and Mac OS X have differences, knowing how to navigate an OS is also a skill that might be needed and is in many ways relevant, as the employee needs to find her/his way around it in order to work there.

    You may know PS like your backyard and use Windows as your primary OS and have no experience with other OSs.
    But what if the company you want to work for does only use Mac OS X?
    PS might be the same there, but you don't know how to navigate an unknown (to you) file structure, what the Menu Bar and Dock is for, how to set System Preferences if needed, if you have to troubleshoot, and so forth.

    That's why companies add the OS to their ads if it is relevant.
     
  11. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

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    #11
    Macs have historically been associated withe "creative" work and the "creative" industry. DTP and graphic design was born on the Mac. Macs are still the most popular choice for these things.
     
  12. Nala thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #12
    Yeah, that's really a big part of it. But not always, sometimes it's a "provide your own system" listing and anyhow Avid is faster to get things done than FCP you don't have to render stuff, make a self-contained movie and import it back all the time just coz FCP can't keep track of renders and "Color" can't function with SPFX. Also Avid has an awesome "Script Tool" that lets you import a movie or doc script and it lines up all the takes next to the dialogue on the script-- just click on the thumbnail and go. But that's another topic. Anyhow I see all these FCP/mac-based photoshop and AfterEffects jobs listed when I can do the jobs faster on Avid without using Mac. BTW I love Macs, they are great, I just don't see how they could be considered a required platform, unless as you mention they got the stuff in house and want you to use their gear.
     
  13. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

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    #13
    You don't need to spend a King's ransom to use FCP. Avid costs quite a bit. Apple made it easy for nearly everyone to do great film/design work, not just the big studios. And Avid/FCP share is about 50-50. FCP is quite popular.
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #14
    When you run a company, one of the things you'll learn is that you benefit from standardizing tools like hardware and software. It makes it easier to take advantage of volume pricing, easier to standardize training, easier to ensure file compatibility. If you have 30 people trained on using one OS and app suite, and have one person using something different, you lose productivity. If your preference is Windows, look for a job in a company with PCs as the company standard.
     
  15. Nala thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 24, 2010
    #15
    How much is FCP these days? Avid Media Composer is $2,295. and a laptop to run it on PC about $1,500. You'd not want to do Red on a laptop, but any other job, yes. Of course a dual-quad core would be much better and Red ready too.
     
  16. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #16
    The price is easy to find out. Go to www.apple.com, select the Store on the top left, search for Final Cut Studio and then you'll see the price, which is 43% of Avid MC.

    By the way, it's Windows, not PC.
     

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