Nehalem - Really worth waiting for?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by ptjh, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. ptjh macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #1
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Nehalem

    "Core-wise, clock-for-clock, Nehalem will provide a 15%-20% increase in performance compared to Penryn"

    If I was to buy a 2.8 or 2.53 MBP now would it be a big deal? Is the Nehalem microarchitecture giving a roughly a 15% increase really going to bother anyone with the New MBP much?

    What are the likely processor speeds for Nehalem for laptops?

    I plan on keeping my laptop at least until Macbooks Pro's contain Quad Core processors

    I'm using it for pro audio (heavy softsynth stuff).

    Here's a summary of various (sometimes conflicting) predictions/reports...


    "It has been reported that Nehalem will have a focus on performance, which accounts for the increased core size.[10] Compared to Penryn, Nehalem will have:

    * 1.1x to 1.25x the single-threaded performance or 1.2x to 2x the multithreaded performance at the same power level
    * 30% lower power usage for the same performance
    * According to a preview from AnandTech "expect a 20-30% overall advantage over Penryn with only a 10% increase in power usage. It looks like Intel is on track to delivering just that in Q4."[11]
    * Core-wise, clock-for-clock, Nehalem will provide a 15%-20% increase in performance compared to Penryn. [4]

    PC Watch found that a Nehalem "Gainestown" processor has 1.6x the SPECint_rate2006 integer performance and 2.4x the SPECfp_rate_2006 floating-point performance of a 3.0 GHz Xeon X5365 "Clovertown" quad-core processor.[10]

    A 2.93 GHz Nehalem "Bloomfield" system has been used to run a 3DMark Vantage benchmark and gave a CPU score of 17,966.[12] The 2.66 GHz variant scores 16,294. A 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo E6600 scores 4,300.[13]

    AnandTech tested the Intel QuickPath Interconnect (4.8 GT/s version) and found the copy bandwidth using triple-channel 1066 MHz DDR3 was 12.0 GB/s. A 3.0 GHz Core 2 Quad system using dual-channel 1066 MHz DDR3 achieved 6.9 GB/s.[14]

    Overclocking will be possible with Bloomfield processors and the X58 chipset. The Lynnfield and Havendale processors will use a PCH removing the need for a northbridge chipset."
     
  2. wheelhot macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    #2
    Well, if you are not in a rush of having a new notebook, then by all means wait for Nehalem cause its going to be worth it. But here is something you need to keep in your mind, in technology, things change pretty fast. When the Nehalem appears, there will be new processor that will appear in the upcoming months that will be both smaller, energy efficient and faster. So it depends on how you look at things and if you really need to upgrade or not.

    Yeah, Nehalem will have mobile quad-core processors but whether it will appear in the MBP or not is uncertain cause I guess if it consumes a lot of power then most likely Apple would put it as a BTO.
     
  3. RITZFit macrumors 65816

    RITZFit

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Location:
    In my Corner
    #3
    very true, and thats why I wouldn't worry about it. there's always going to be something better and faster coming out. you'll drive your self crazy (or broke) trying to keep up w/ today's technology.
     
  4. Purple Pelican macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #4
    I agree. You should wait for Nehalem if you have the luxury of waiting possibly 6 or more months until you get a new notebook. I'm holding out, just because I don't have a pressing need for a new notebook, yet I want one.

    But as others said, there's always gonna be something new coming out. I was going to upgrade my old PB a while ago...then I heard about Penryn, Rosa, Nehalem... But you have to take the plunge and buy a new laptop sometime.
     
  5. wheelhot macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    #5
    Yup, so close you eyes and tell to the cashier I want a new MBP and hand out your credit card ;)

    But hey, it seems you set your own timeline when to upgrade so that is a good thing, so when Apple do offer a quad core on their notebooks, go and get it and don't try to foresee the future to see will there be any improvement cause they will always be. :cool:
     
  6. ntrigue macrumors 68040

    ntrigue

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    #6
    :wow: There's enough reason right there. I'm buying a refurb Late 2008 MBPro when they hit the Apple Store and selling it when release rumors escalate October 2009.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    From the article you linked, it appears the Clarksville-based Nehalem mobile processors will be available in quad-core, 2.66GHz, 2.93GHz or 3.2GHz speeds.
     
  8. iCries macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2008
    #8
    2009 is not the year in my opinion to get nehalem as they will be less power efficient than the nehalems in 2010, but of course its about need, if you need it in 2009 buy it.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    According to the article, the quad-core Clarksfield mobile processors are due out late 2009, with the slower, more energy efficient dual-core Auburndale processors due out in early 2010. I'd prefer more speed over more power efficiency.

    Of course, it's anybody's guess how long after Intel's release, if at all, they show up in MacBook Pros!
     
  10. ptjh thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #10
    Cool. I'm gonna get the MB pro now.
    Now, should I get the 2.8 or 2.53 given I want to keep my laptop for a while?
     
  11. Purple Pelican macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #11
    When are we getting 8 cores for mobile applications?:p
     
  12. plumbingandtech macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    #12
    If you think you may go to Nehelam in the next two years, I would get the 2.53 , save money and buy applecare for it (or some other add-ons)/


    Selling you notebook later with applecare will add value and confidence to your future buyer.
     

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