Nest Thermostat Added to Apple Online Store

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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Following news from late last week that the Nest thermostat from iPod creator Tony Fadell would be coming to Apple's retail stores, the device has just been added to the company's online store. While currently not available for pickup in retail store locations, it should be making its way to the brick-and-mortar locations shortly.




The Nest thermostat is priced at $249.95 in the U.S. online store and is just one of a number of products featured in Apple's App-Enabled Accessories section. The thermostat can be controlled via a free universal iOS app [App Store], with access to controls also available through web browsers.
The Nest Learning Thermostat helps you stop wasting energy, while providing control using your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Mac. Consider that your thermostat controls about half your energy bill--more than TV, appliances, and lighting combined. But it's wasting energy every time it turns on the heating or cooling system in an empty house. The Nest Learning Thermostat solves this problem by programming itself, turning itself down when you're away, and keeping track of your energy use.
Apple features a number of such app-enabled products in its online store, including the Parrot AR.Drone, iGrill cooking thermometer and Withings blood pressure monitor. Several such products are also available in Apple's retail stores.

Article Link: Nest Thermostat Added to Apple Online Store
 

unlimitedx

macrumors 6502a
Jun 15, 2010
635
0
I don't use the thermostat so there would be no savings for me.. Seems like the majority of people do
 
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NewAnger

macrumors 6502a
Apr 24, 2012
904
2
Denver Colorado
At $250, I'll keep on using my Honeywell programmable thermostat. Since I installed it, it dropped my bill down from $150 to $105 in the winter. Don't have a use for it in the summer.
 
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Macman45

macrumors G5
Jul 29, 2011
13,199
133
Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
I have a wifi thermostat system for my central heating. It's set to 20c 365 24 / 7. The ability to crank up the heating remotely is mildly interesting, but I can think of better ways of spending that kind of cash!
 
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HeartMan

macrumors newbie
Mar 8, 2011
8
11
La Vista NE, USA
I Like It

I installed mine last December, replacing a regular programmable Honeywell. So far our heating/cooling bills are showing a pretty good downward trend. It's hard to say if it is the thermostat or the mild winter/spring but so far I'm really liking it.
 
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DakotaGuy

macrumors 601
Jan 14, 2002
4,017
3,272
South Dakota, USA
At $250, I'll keep on using my Honeywell programmable thermostat. Since I installed it, it dropped my bill down from $150 to $105 in the winter. Don't have a use for it in the summer.
Exactly. This looks cool and being able to operate it remotely is a nice feature, but the Robertshaw programmable that I installed for $50 will save about the same amount of money. I suppose if you can't figure out how to properly schedule your thermostat then the learning feature might be nice, but I haven't had any problems with the one I installed.
 
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gLaDiAtOr73

macrumors member
Nov 29, 2008
65
0
for those who bought 2 and 3 of these.....

Do you need seperate A/C units for each nest thermostat? Or is there a master and slaves for one unit? (meaning the master is installed where the older thermostat was and the slaves can be installed in any bedroom and communicates with the "master")
 
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diamond.g

macrumors 603
Mar 20, 2007
6,361
321
Virginia
for those who bought 2 and 3 of these.....

Do you need seperate A/C units for each nest thermostat? Or is there a master and slaves for one unit? (meaning the master is installed where the older thermostat was and the slaves can be installed in any bedroom and communicates with the "master")
Multiple units or a zoned system.
 
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newdeal

macrumors 68020
Oct 21, 2009
2,367
1,443
Will the control a geothermal system with 3 stage heat and 2 stage cooling? My thermostat sucks and while I don't need it to turn up and down (that isn't good for geothermal) I would like to control it with an app. Also does it control humidity as well?
 
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gLaDiAtOr73

macrumors member
Nov 29, 2008
65
0
Will the control a geothermal system with 3 stage heat and 2 stage cooling? My thermostat sucks and while I don't need it to turn up and down (that isn't good for geothermal) I would like to control it with an app. Also does it control humidity as well?
looking at the app in the app store it appears to control humidity
 
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diamond.g

macrumors 603
Mar 20, 2007
6,361
321
Virginia
Will the control a geothermal system with 3 stage heat and 2 stage cooling?
No. That is something that has been complained about.

----------

looking at the app in the app store it appears to control humidity
It know what the humidity level of a room is for AirWave use. Not sure if that is the same thing as controlling humidity. (If you ignore the fact that ACs remove humidity from the air).
 
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redscull

macrumors 6502a
Jul 1, 2010
773
731
Texas
I've never understood why all thermostats offer programmability when it's such a pointless feature. What would be infinitely more useful is also exceedingly simpler: min and max. Does this thermostat have that feature?

e.g. I want to put in just two numbers. 68f and 76f. If the temperature in the house is ever below 68f, I want it to be heated up to 68f. If the house is ever above 76f, I want it cooled down to 76f. Obviously, no action needed while temp is between 68f and 76f.

What's annoying is having to manually toggle a thermostat between cool and heat and having to adjust the target temp accordingly. Or I can set it to auto but then it only takes one number. For budget (and comfort) concerns, I don't want to pick a number in between 68f and 76f that solves for both heating and cooling; there is no perfect number.
 
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NewAnger

macrumors 6502a
Apr 24, 2012
904
2
Denver Colorado
I've never understood why all thermostats offer programmability when it's such a pointless feature. What would be infinitely more useful is also exceedingly simpler: min and max. Does this thermostat have that feature?

e.g. I want to put in just two numbers. 68f and 76f. If the temperature in the house is ever below 68f, I want it to be heated up to 68f. If the house is ever above 76f, I want it cooled down to 76f. Obviously, no action needed while temp is between 68f and 76f.

What's annoying is having to manually toggle a thermostat between cool and heat and having to adjust the target temp accordingly. Or I can set it to auto but then it only takes one number. For budget (and comfort) concerns, I don't want to pick a number in between 68f and 76f that solves for both heating and cooling; there is no perfect number.
What wastes energy and raises your energy bill is heating the house when you are not there. Do you need the house at 72 degrees when no one is there? Also, do you need the house at 72 degrees when you are sleeping? Why not lower it to 68 or so and have the thermostat automatically heat the house just before you wake every morning.

Mine saves me about $50 a month than before I had a programmable thermostat. Is that pointless?
 
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rmwebs

macrumors 68040
Apr 6, 2007
3,140
0
Am I the only one here who doesn't 'Get it'? In essence, its only useful feature is being able to set the thermostat remotely...everything else is fairly pointless...its a thermostat at the end of the day. Are we soon going to see iOS enabled toilet flushers?!

As nice as it looks, it just seems like its a bit of a gimmick for people to basically say 'I've got one and can blow $250 on something that looks fancy but performs such a mundane task'.
 
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onepremiere

macrumors regular
May 16, 2012
176
2
I think a lot of people who have posted here aren't really grasping the concept the way I am. I see it as a hand-off, out-of-mind system. Like potty training a puppy. You work with it for a few weeks, and eventually it can do it on its own. The fact that it will learn your patterns, and recognizes when you're away is impressive. The ability to control the system wirelessly is just a bonus, not the key concept.

For the record, I was trying to set the AC last night and was close to removing it from the wall and lighting it on fire. As others have said, I just want the heat on at this temp, and the AC on at another temp, simple enough? No, they've over-engineered something so simple. The Nest solves that problem. The nest will do that for you.

When I first saw the price, my first thought was, “where do I buy it?” That’s a reasonable price to pay for clean, stylish design paired with simplicity and convenience.
 
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tdmac

macrumors 6502
Feb 9, 2008
353
6
The unique feature is the learning process. Has a built in sensor to tell if you are home or not. Automatically adjusts its settings based on that and the manual adjustments you make. Over time it auto programs to the ideal temp based on your unique patterns. All in a sleek and easy to use dial. Setup is also easy and made for those who can do simple DIY projects around the house.

Now what the thermostat is missing to be ideal is the ability to add remote sensors. Your thermostat might not be in the ideal spot for sensing motion and occupancy. Multiple sensors would get that info as well as multiple temp readings around the house to better adjust things.
 
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kingtj

macrumors 68030
Oct 23, 2003
2,565
708
Brunswick, MD
Yeah, you're not quite getting it ....

The remote programming capability is actually just a minor benefit of the Nest, as far as I've been able to tell.

What really makes it beneficial is its "intelligent" capabilities. Unlike my $40 programmable thermostat at home now, I'm not stuck entering a series of temperatures for fixed times on a schedule -- one for "heat", and another whole set for "cool".

Rather, the Nest actually uses a built-in microphone to "hear" when everything is silent for a period of time -- indicating people aren't home, or everyone's sound asleep, and can use that information to decide it's time to save a little energy on heating or cooling.

Additionally, by people simply adjusting the current temp. up or down a bit, whenever they want to -- it learns patterns and programs its own rules based on them.

I don't know about you? But in my house, I find people are constantly pressing the temp up/down buttons on my thermostat to override the current programmed settings if they feel it's "too hot" or "too cold" -- making the fixed schedule less useful.


Am I the only one here who doesn't 'Get it'? In essence, its only useful feature is being able to set the thermostat remotely...everything else is fairly pointless...its a thermostat at the end of the day. Are we soon going to see iOS enabled toilet flushers?!

As nice as it looks, it just seems like its a bit of a gimmick for people to basically say 'I've got one and can blow $250 on something that looks fancy but performs such a mundane task'.
 
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Joz3d

macrumors member
Jul 19, 2008
64
0
Hack-a-House

Yay! Now hackers can break into your home network while you're not there, set your temperature real high and kill your pets!
 
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PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Jan 22, 2009
2,762
4,242
Houston, TX
In my area, better control of A/C would more then pay for the device in less then 2 years.

(Such as when no one home, adjust temp during night, turn off when out for day, but resume schedule when back, etc)

Now, I wonder why no wired version?
 
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