Network Accounts- what is better: SMB or AFP for clients to connect?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by iansilv, May 10, 2016.

  1. iansilv macrumors 65816

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    Jun 2, 2007
    #1
    I am running a small network in my office with all mac clients- all iMacs actually. I have run in to some stability issues with the accounts crashing safari, not being able to login, hanging, etc.

    What is the best connection protocol for the network home folders? I have them set to SMB, any reason to switch to AFP?
     
  2. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
    #2
    Depends! Apple started dropping AFP for SMB about 2-3 years ago. Do if those Mac clients are running OS X 9.0 or better then use SMB 2.

    Read some fixes in the blog post Fixing Windows OS X FileSharing Slowness SMB2.

    For connecting to NAS clients just use the cifs//ip-or-server name .
     
  3. iansilv thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #3
    Ok this is purely for iMacs connecting to a Mac mini server. No windows or nas.
     
  4. chrfr macrumors 603

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    Jul 11, 2009
    #4
    Apple has not dropped AFP whatsoever. They've switched SMB to be the default for file sharing, but for network homes, AFP is likely to work less badly than SMB.
    --- Post Merged, May 11, 2016 ---
    Network homes in general are not particularly reliable. I would use AFP over SMB if I had to do it, though. Any sort of network instability or slowdowns are going to cause reliability problems, so you definitely do not want to be using network homes over wifi.
     
  5. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #5
    However you fail to realize the using CIFS forces modern Macs to use smb1 instead of a SMB:// connection.
     
  6. iansilv thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #6
    Sorry man... What's "CIFS" stand for?...
     
  7. chrfr macrumors 603

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    Jul 11, 2009
    #7
    It's a (different) Windows file sharing protocol. You can't specify CIFS in Server.app when configuring network homes so the idea of using it for this is irrelevant. CIFS stands for "Common Internet File System".
    Stick with AFP if you must use network homes in this environment.
     
  8. iansilv thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #8
    Ok thank you everyone. I'm going to redo everything to use afp and hopefully that will solve the reliability issues...
     
  9. iansilv thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #9
    Alright to follow up here, the user accounts have bene recreated fresh with a folder in the root of the hard drive not eh server next to users, and using AFP and so far, not a single problem. So I think this is the most table way to do local network accounts at least as of 10.11.4.
     
  10. rigormortis, May 13, 2016
    Last edited: May 13, 2016

    rigormortis macrumors 68000

    rigormortis

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    Jun 11, 2009
    #10
    i thought smb2 was required for time machine now or was it afp?
    i use afp on my readynas units because it just seems the performance on the mac seems faster / or more reliable
    i recall that all readynas units needed new firmware because of a networking change on os x, but i forget now if it was samba or afp they changed


    a real time capsule uses AFP for file sharing. so much for phasing out, NYA NYA

    i clicked on a random file on my Apple Time Capsule and it says this
    afp://time capsule._afpovertcp._tcp.local/Data/Wrestling

    so there
     
  11. Geeky Chimp macrumors member

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    Jun 3, 2015
    #11
    We had quite a few issues with Network Homes on SMB with Yosemite and El Capitan. Switching to AFP also resolved all of the issues for us, we did this switch over several months ago if that helps.
    We're now using AFP to connect to the shared folders too and all seems to be working well.
     

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