Network predicament

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Dagless, Apr 22, 2007.

  1. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    Fighting to stay in the EU
    #1
    For the past couple of years I've felt the rough end of a fairly long distance WiFi network. I've managed to grab hold of a little 4-port router. Bear in mind I know little about networking! Basically the setup is like this at the moment-

    Wired- 2x Computers & Xbox 360
    Wireless- iMac & PowerBook (plus little things like the DS's, other laptops etc...)

    The router is located downstairs and a huge wired cable makes its way around the house to my brothers 360 in the room next door whilst I feed off the 25% signal of wireless. Could I somehow put this ethernet cable into a 4 port wired-only router and then connect 3 wired devices into it? And have it feed off the internet from the main modem/router? Or does it not work like that?

    Any help would be so appreciated :)
     
  2. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #2
    Confused.... but...

    Yes, you can put a simple 4 port switch (not a router) at the wall connection in your bro's area, then run his machine plus three other wired Ethernet devices wherever you can run a cable to.
     
  3. Schroedinger macrumors regular

    Schroedinger

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #3
    let me elaborate on what canadaram said. You've got two types of devices, a router and a switch. A router assigns IP addresses to the devices on your network, the switch acts like a hub allowing you to branch out a single cable into multiple cables.

    So, if you have a router connected to your internet source, let's say a cable modem, and down the line you have a switch, you're good. The router will give an IP address to everything down the line and the switch will be invisible. However, if you connect the internet to the switch and then to the router, that's going to be problematic, as the router won't assign IP addresses upstream. Those items connected to the switch won't be on your network. Based on how you have the switch setup, you're downstream router may not be on the network (one of the wired devices may be getting the one IP address that your cable modem (or whatever) is getting.)

    Another option is to get something like an airport express and set it up as a bridge to your main router. if you put the airport express in your room, or on the level above your basement, it'll take the signal from the main router and amplify and rebroadcast it.

    good luck.
     
  4. Dagless thread starter macrumors Core

    Dagless

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    Fighting to stay in the EU
    #4
    So I just need a single Airport Express halfway between the source and my computer and I'm good to go? That really does sound like the perfect device for me. Although, what with my iMac having Draft N, should I wait for Airport Express to be updated with N band?
     
  5. Schroedinger macrumors regular

    Schroedinger

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #5
    Here's one thing to keep in mind regarding n and g mixed networks. Unless all of your devices are using an n card, your router will not function at n speeds. That is to say, if you have 10 n devices, and 1 g device, the whole network will run at g speeds.

    If you have a mixed network, and aren't planning to upgrade everything to n, which i don't think is even possible now, then don't worry about it.

    b and g can share a network just fine, each running at native speed, but n doesn't play as nice.
     

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