network test

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by blackbelt, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. blackbelt macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
    #1
    I just set up a new wireless router, and bought a usb - ethernet adapter from apple, which does work with MBPs, but is only for 10/100 connections, and one of the features of my new router is a 1000 (gigabit) connection. Does this mean that the adapter would not be worth using, and that i would get a faster connection plugging directly into the ethernet port. Is there a program that can test this for me? Thanks!
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    Faster ONLY if you're connecting computer to computer.

    It's unlikely that you have an internet connection with your ISP that's much faster than 10Mbps. So, you won't get a "faster" connection to the internet because the USB->Ethernet adapter is not the source of your speed bottleneck.

    Further, why not use the built-in ethernet connector on your MBP? It's a gigabit connector.
    Or did you mean that you had a MBA, which has no built-in ethernet connector?
     
  3. tersono macrumors 68000

    tersono

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    Yes, you'll get significantly faster throughput with GigE than you will on a 10/100 network. Not really sure why you bothered with the USB dingus, to tell the truth, given that the MBP has wireless and GigE ethernet as standard

    Ah - Yellow, above, makes a good point. The benefits ONLY apply if you're transferring files over your LAN. It won't affect Internet access.
     
  4. blackbelt thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
    #4
    well... i know this sounds lazy, but i am away from my desk often (with my computer), and when i get to my desk to do work, i like to only plug in what i have to, I have a usb hum to limit the number of cords, and would like to include the ethernet cord in this (hens the adapter) but will only do it that way if it will give me a faster connection when compared to the wireless signal (which is strong as the router is next to the computer) and comparable to the direct ethernet port. Does this make any sense? I am a webmaster, and am always uploading and downloading files via filezilla, and need the fastest connection that i can get.
     
  5. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #5
    Yes, that sounds lazy. 1 extra cable over the course of your life.. <shrug>
    Whatever you like!

    But, as I said, unless you have some sort of mega direct network connection to the outside world, or you're using "filezilla" to another machine on your local network, then there's no point in worrying about 10/100/1000 megabit connections.

    So, where are you uploading files to? Inside or outside your subnet?
     
  6. blackbelt thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
  7. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #7
    Then it doesn't matter, since it's unlikely that your external network connection is above 10Mbps.
     
  8. blackbelt thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
    #8
    ok thanks
     
  9. hayduke macrumors 65816

    hayduke

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    is a state of mind.
    #9
    On a related note, what is the best way to test the network connection speed between two local computers? There are plenty of on-line tools for testing your upload/download speed, but I want to know the speed between two of my own computers as a function of how I have the network set up. Any ideas? I tried various things like simply dragging files and timing it and using scp from the terminal, but I'd really just like an app that reports the speed. Any thoughts?

    To the OP I can appreciate the "laziness." Part of my interest in network speeds is trying to figure out if my Airport card is as fast as my wired connection so I don't have to plug it in everyday!
     
  10. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    NH
    #10
    To measure speed, I take some large files from my PC (connected via GigE on the TC), and copy them to my Mac Pro.

    In Activity Monitor, click on the Network tab, and it will report the speed of the current network communications.

    I'm sure there are better ways, I just haven't bothered to find them.

    -Kevin
     
  11. NetworkMeUp macrumors newbie

    NetworkMeUp

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2008
    #11
    Since you asked... here's a great article review from eHomeUpgrade covering the newly released Speed Meter Pro, a networking software tool designed to help users pinpoint network bottlenecks.

    Speed Meter Pro scans across your entire network including connected computers, wired and wireless networks and Internet connection. Then it identifies the source of network slowdowns, enabling you to address problems quickly and optimize your network for maximum speed and productivity. It also proactively monitors your network to detect issues that need immediate attention. Hopefully this is what you're looking for - if so, glad I could help!
     
  12. hayduke macrumors 65816

    hayduke

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    is a state of mind.
    #12
    $40! Ouch. And it isn't for Macs. I'll stick to scp for now.
     

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