Networking Q

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by KettyKrueger, Oct 15, 2007.

  1. KettyKrueger macrumors 6502

    KettyKrueger

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    #1
    Hey All

    Following on from my previous post, I've decided to go wired. I tried wireless (g) for a few days but I got way too many freezes, must be getting interference from somewhere.

    Anyways, I have a wired network anyways so I'm using that. My question is, and please excuse the lack of knowledge on my part; what makes my network a gigbyte network and not 100mb? Sorry I know that sounds stupid!

    Let me explain, I have an iMac C2D which has gigbyte ethernet so I'm okay there. My Apple TV has gigbite ethernet. At this time I'm unsure if my router does [it's a Netgear DG834G]. To take advantage of the higher speeds of gigbite ethernet will I need to replace my network cables, or just my router [if it doesn't already have gigbyte ethernet]?

    Hope all that makes sense! Cheers in advance.
     
  2. WildPalms macrumors 6502a

    WildPalms

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Location:
    Honolulu, HI
    #2
    Just to clarify, you have gigabit ports, not gigabyte. Divide by 8 to get the speed in bytes.

    Your Netgear DG834G has a built in switch which is 100 megabits, so your gigabit ports will drop down to 100 megabits when connected to that router.

    So, you have to ask yourself, do I want to transfer large files regularly and is the time to transfer those files that critical? If not, then your router is fine. Also keep in mind that your internet connection wont exceed 100 megabits/s anyway, so you gain nothing on that side of the equation.

    Also, I'm sure your AppleTV ethernet port is 100 megabit, but check to see it hasnt been upgraded since the last model.

    If you want fast transfers, in the minimum time, then grab a Netgear Gigabit switch and connect your devices, e.g. Apple TV and iMac to that, then in the upload port of the Netgear Switch, connect that to the router. That will give you high speed transfers and retain your existing router as the gateway to the internet.

    Just to confirm your existing purchases, the Netgear range is great and I'd recommend sticking with that brand.
    :D
     
  3. KettyKrueger thread starter macrumors 6502

    KettyKrueger

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    Cheers for the in-depth reply, very useful.

    You're right, AppleTV is only 100 Ethernet, not gigbit.

    I guess I just wanted to get the best performance out of the AppleTV. The whole wireless affair was a bit of a nightmare! But no probs yet on my wired network. :cool:

    Cheers again :D
     
  4. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #4
    I know your question has already been answered, but for future reference, to reach speeds of 1000 Mbps, Cat 5 cable is required, although Cat 5e is recommended. These days, Cat 5e is pretty much standard, so you probably don't need to worry about it.
     
  5. iPhil macrumors 68040

    iPhil

    #5
    Since OP has decided go wired network.. I got one important note for people who got 'wired' networks...


    Raise the ethernet cable before vacuuming around the the cable or un-plug the cable totaling from apple tv and mac ..

    Or there'll be a possible chance of frying the internal ethernet ports.. :eek: :eek:
     
  6. WildPalms macrumors 6502a

    WildPalms

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Location:
    Honolulu, HI
    #6
    I'm guessing you mean the chance of the vacuum motor coming into close proximity of the cable? I have Gigabit so I can afford to accidentally suck up some bytes when I'm cleaning house :p Just kidding :)
     
  7. iPhil macrumors 68040

    iPhil

    #7



    static charge from vacuum into cable = kills ethernet ports
     

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