Networking question

soundsystem00

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 15, 2016
59
5
I live in a garage apartment and its kind of separate from the house. I run an ethernet cord all the way in here, but that is limited on how much I can move around. Since I already have the ethernet cord running back here, what kind of modem/router do I need to get to extend the wifi into my room? I do not trust wifi extenders because the few I have messed with are gimmicks. I just want something that I can hook the ethernet cord into and start a new signal in my room.

For example, If I sit my laptop on the desk ( rarely want to do that ) and plug in the ethernet cord directly to it, I can run internet connection sharing and broadcast a wifi network from my laptop to run my other devices.

But I have rather use something else to do the same thing. It's on the tip of my tongue but I can't figure it out. I can't just buy another modem can I? Because there is only an ethernet cord, not a cable or dsl cord here.
 

HenryAZ

macrumors 6502a
Jan 9, 2010
602
96
South Congress AZ
All you really need is an access point, rather than a router (which has other functions besides wi-fi). Give it the same SSID, password, IP configuration, and other settings as the wi-fi network in your house. You can use a router, but you have to disable routing (put it in bridge mode) and dhcp, leaving it in effect just an access point. Again, use the same SSID, password and other settings as your house wi-fi network. In either case, make your IP settings the same as your main network (give it a static IP address, same network/netmask, and default gateway).

If you want to use the ethernet cable for a computer as well, put in a small switch (4 port will do), plug in your ethernet cable, computer and new access point to that.
 

Howard2k

macrumors 68030
Mar 10, 2016
2,536
1,818
All you really need is an access point, rather than a router (which has other functions besides wi-fi). Give it the same SSID, password, IP configuration, and other settings as the wi-fi network in your house. You can use a router, but you have to disable routing (put it in bridge mode) and dhcp, leaving it in effect just an access point. Again, use the same SSID, password and other settings as your house wi-fi network. In either case, make your IP settings the same as your main network (give it a static IP address, same network/netmask, and default gateway).

If you want to use the ethernet cable for a computer as well, put in a small switch (4 port will do), plug in your ethernet cable, computer and new access point to that.

If you use a router and plug the Ethernet cable into the WAN side you don't need to disable routing and DHCP etc. You just need to have them on alternate IP subnets (192.168.0.0 on the main network, 192.168.1.0 on the second). It only gets complex if you have apps that need to move data and you have firewall implications. Separate SSIDs etc.

Your note is good, and thorough, but if it's really basic surfing then maybe too technical. :)

Either way I agree, AP is perhaps the easiest way. Or a router in AP mode.
 

hobowankenobi

macrumors 6502a
Aug 27, 2015
976
260
on the land line mr. smith.
Agreed: Access Point would be the best.

Is it your router in the house? Or are you a renter, with no access to the primary router?

If you don't have access to the router, be sure the AP can do everything you need, and that you can manage it seperately from the primary router. Something like this would do it, as you could set it up and manage it from a mobile device. The POE injector that supplies power makes installation even easier/more flexible, as the AP does not have to be close to a wall power outlet too.
 

HenryAZ

macrumors 6502a
Jan 9, 2010
602
96
South Congress AZ
Plug in an Ubiquiti UAP-AC-LITE to that ethernet cable and call it a day.
I've tried Ubiquiti, and liked everything about them except having to use a controller. I now use Engenius AP's. The quality is equal to, or better, than Ubiquiti. And you can control/configure them entirely through the web interface.
 

556fmjoe

macrumors 68000
Apr 19, 2014
1,602
835
I've tried Ubiquiti, and liked everything about them except having to use a controller. I now use Engenius AP's. The quality is equal to, or better, than Ubiquiti. And you can control/configure them entirely through the web interface.
You don't need a controller if you don't want one. They have an app that does everything the controller does.
 

hobowankenobi

macrumors 6502a
Aug 27, 2015
976
260
on the land line mr. smith.
You don't need a controller if you don't want one. They have an app that does everything the controller does.
Yep. FYI for anybody following along:

3 options for UBNT:

  • mobile app (iOS or Android)
  • software app (mac or PC)
  • hardware controller

First two are free....hardware controller adds features, but costs.

I have been using the sofware on a Mac for years, only ever run it to manage, update, or check logs, etc. No need for it to be running to APs to work....I leave it off for months at time.
 

hobowankenobi

macrumors 6502a
Aug 27, 2015
976
260
on the land line mr. smith.
I've tried Ubiquiti, and liked everything about them except having to use a controller. I now use Engenius AP's. The quality is equal to, or better, than Ubiquiti. And you can control/configure them entirely through the web interface.
Interesting. That's a new brand to me. Looks like a nice product line.
 
Last edited:

techwarrior

macrumors 65816
Jul 30, 2009
1,110
395
Colorado
I live in a garage apartment and its kind of separate from the house. I run an ethernet cord all the way in here, but that is limited on how much I can move around. Since I already have the ethernet cord running back here, what kind of modem/router do I need to get to extend the wifi into my room? I do not trust wifi extenders because the few I have messed with are gimmicks. I just want something that I can hook the ethernet cord into and start a new signal in my room.

For example, If I sit my laptop on the desk ( rarely want to do that ) and plug in the ethernet cord directly to it, I can run internet connection sharing and broadcast a wifi network from my laptop to run my other devices.

But I have rather use something else to do the same thing. It's on the tip of my tongue but I can't figure it out. I can't just buy another modem can I? Because there is only an ethernet cord, not a cable or dsl cord here.
Assumptions: The garage apartment is rented from the house occupants, so you don't really have access to the house router other than an ethernet connection?

A router would require programming on both routers to get it to work reliably without killing both networks, double NAT causes all kinds of headaches. A Router in Access Point (Bridged) Mode or a simple Access Point will give you WiFi in your apartment, connect it to the ethernet cable, then connect your devices wired or wireless to the bridged router or AP. The Wireless network name and password need not match the house, in fact if it is different, then you won't share bandwidth with house occupants, but you will share the main router's capacity since you connect via ethernet. Some routers will automatically run in Access Point mode if nothing is connected to the WAN port, just plug the house ethernet to one of the LAN ports and run with it. Others may need to be programmed, if you are unsure of how to do this or are weak on network skills stick to an Access Point.

Access Points have 1-5 ethernet ports depending on brand. If you need\want both wired and wireless connections for your devices get on with 2 or more ports. A switch can be connected to the second port to give you more ethernet ports if needed.

Assuming it is a small living space, don't go too fancy. Just about any Access Point will give you WiFi speeds of 100Mbps which is presumably your ethernet speed. If ethernet is 1Gbps, go with an 802.11AC access point, it will come close to matching wired speeds. But if the house router is connected to an ISP with 100Mbps or less, don't bother, the slowest link will dictate actual speeds. just about any AP you will find will be 802.11n or better these days and will give you 100Mbps or better speeds.

Keep it simple. Your situation doesn't warrant costly or sophisticated gear.
 

soundsystem00

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 15, 2016
59
5
Wow guys, thank you for the info so far. It has been running pretty good lately. Maybe it just had to get warmed up.

The router came with instructions that allowed me to log into the router and mess with some settings really easily. I did set it up as an access point after finding the normal option to not be that fast. There is one more option to use as "wifi extender" but so far the access point options seem to be doing really well. I did not name them the same name as the first wifi networks and I used a different browser.

It did give me a normal network and a 5G network so I use both of them and that helps save bandwidth I have noticed so I have my firestick on the second one and my laptop on the main one. Other small decides like ipad or security camera seem to be fine.

Think that will do? Anything else I should know? And again thanks!
 

techwarrior

macrumors 65816
Jul 30, 2009
1,110
395
Colorado
WiFi extender uses the WiFi radio to link to the router's WiFi. With most Access Points, this cuts bandwidth in half, on both the router, and AP. Mesh APs use dedicated radios for the "uplink" to the router., but standard gear shared the uplink with client connections. Not so much of an issue for a couple of devices, but if there are a number of WiFi devices fighting for access, things can slow to a crawl.

Since you seem to have reliable Ethernet, keep using it in the mode you have it in now for best performance.