New 27" nuisance, need password for everything

kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
I just got a new 27' and it's asking for password for everything thing I do. "finder.app need password, new folder, severything without exception. One could spend 1/2 their time entering passwords. How to get rif of? El Capitan, and never saw this on old 27" also El Capitan. Thanks.
 

kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
someone here may have an idea, but seriously; it's new? genius bar, or just call apple...
[doublepost=1461122832][/doublepost]Yes, I have a case already with a senior tech, from the migration, but who knows when I'll speak to him next....
 

richard2

macrumors regular
Oct 21, 2010
236
50
England, United Kingdom
Try the following:

Note: The following procedure must be performed on an OS X user account that has administrative privileges.

  1. Open Terminal.
  2. Enter the following:

    shopt -s dotglob; sudo chown -Rh $(id -u):$(id -g) ~/* && sudo chmod -Rh u+rwX ~/*
  3. Enter your OS X user account password if you're prompted to.
 
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kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
Try the following:

Note: The following procedure must be performed on an OS X user account that has administrative privileges.

  1. Open Terminal.
  2. Enter the following:

    sudo chown -Rh $(id -u):$(id -g) ~/* && sudo chmod -Rh u+rwX ~/*
  3. Enter your OS X user account password if you're prompted to.
Thanks Richard, do you have any documentation on this issue or terminal command?
 

richard2

macrumors regular
Oct 21, 2010
236
50
England, United Kingdom
Thanks Richard, do you have any documentation on this issue or terminal command?
Every file on your Mac has an owner and mode (among other attributes), which determine what kind of access each user has to the file. Occasionally, when you migrate to a another Mac, your new user account isn't made the owner of the contents of your home folder. This prevents any applications from modifying the contents of your home folder without first obtaining administrative access.

The command included in my previous post will do the following:

  • Make your current user account the owner of all of the files in your home folder.
  • Grant your current user account read/write access to all of the files in your home folder. (This probably isn't necessary, but it won't cause any harm.)

Don't worry — it won't cause your Mac to explode. ;)
 
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joedec

macrumors 6502
Jul 25, 2014
405
25
Cupertino
From...

How to Repair User Permissions in Mac OS X

In the newest versions of OS X, there is an additional Repair Permissions application utility hidden away. This tool is located inside boot Repair Utilities. Here’s how to access it.

  1. Restart OS X and hold down the Command and R keys.
  2. You will boot into the Repair Utilities screen. On top, in the Menu Bar click the Utilities item then select Terminal.
  3. In the Terminal window, type “resetpassword” (without the quotes) and hit Return.
  4. The Password reset utility launches, but you’re not going to reset the password. Instead, click on the icon for your Mac’s hard drive at the top. From the drop-down below it, select the user account where you are having issues.
  5. At the bottom of the window, you’ll see an area labeled ‘Reset Home Directory Permissions and ACLs’. Click the Reset button there.
The reset process takes a couple of minutes. When it’s done, quit the programs you’ve opened and restart your Mac. Notice that ‘Spotlight’ starts re-indexing immediately.

Update: This works in OS X 10.7 Lion, and 10.8 Mountain Lion, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, and newer.
 

kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
Thanks Richard, I'm pretty nervous about terminal especially when I see this, can PLEASE, send a confirming link where this command comes from or where your got it?

WARNING: Improper use of the sudo command could lead to data loss
or the deletion of important system files. Please double-check your
typing when using sudo. Type "man sudo" for more information.

To proceed, enter your password, or type Ctrl-C to abort.

Password:


Thanks Joe, will test that out later too.
 

kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
That's cool Richard. Yeah, ok will do, appreciate it.

WARNING: Improper use of the sudo command could lead to data loss
or the deletion of important system files. Please double-check your
 

kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
Ok tried the tip, there is no terminal from the command R.
 

kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
Solved it very quickly in a few seconds finally, I made everyone read/ write. Of course that begs the question, of Apple using terminology everyone.
 

joedec

macrumors 6502
Jul 25, 2014
405
25
Cupertino
That's not the best idea, fortunately the "resetpassword" Utility will sort it out for you. Everyone means anyone who has access to your Mac can write (or delete) your files now. I wouldn't want that kind of exposure.

If you want to read about the Terminal commands, use "man chmod" and "man chown", of course you'll need a rudimentary understanding of file systems.
 
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kevs1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Mar 20, 2016
136
7
Joe, I live alone, I'm the only user. The reset password did not work, I could not find it. I don't do terminal commands unless it's a extremely trusted source.