New D5000 User: What to buy?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by wvuwhat, Dec 28, 2009.

  1. wvuwhat macrumors 65816

    wvuwhat

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2007
    #1
    I received a D5000 for Christmas and also received payment to a local community college class this upcoming January.

    My questions are, what do I absolutely NEED? Money is an issue right now.

    So far, I've bought:
    -Cheap Tripod
    -Lowepro Case (which may go back, depending on if I decide to pick up another lens right now)
    -Digital Photography Vol. 1, the book everyone suggests, as well as my class's main textbook
    -2x8GB Class Six SD cards

    I'm looking into a multicoated filter, wireless shutter release, and lens hood. Advice on these are up in the air, depending on what website you visit.

    Also, I'm able to get Amazon to offer the 55-200mm Nikon lens for about 110.00 after 100.00 instant rebate, which is their current promotion. Is this worth it right now? Is it something I will kick myself for not picking up in the near future?

    Basically, I'm a newbie, steer me in the right direction. Besides Adorama, Butterfly, and Amazon, any other big websites I'm missing?
     
  2. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #2
    Do you have a lens that goes wider than 55mm? On a DX sensor camera, that's a pretty long focal length.

    I assume you do, but it's not listed. :)
     
  3. wvuwhat thread starter macrumors 65816

    wvuwhat

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2007
    #3
    So, as a second thought, my case is definitely going back. I got this one.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004TX71/ref=oss_T15_product


    I'm looking for a good looking bag. I'm 23, so I don't want something that looks terrible. I hate to say the word "hip," but I will. I'm thinking I want to get one that will have:

    -Room for a lens attached to a body, as well as a second telescopic (3rd spot would be nice, but don't want to gain too much bulk)
    -Shoulder sling, backpack maybe, but would like to stay away from it
    -Quick access to the camera
    -Built in card spots would be a plus (if this even exists)
     
  4. wvuwhat thread starter macrumors 65816

    wvuwhat

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2007
    #4
    The only lens I have is the 18-55 kit lens.
     
  5. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #5
    Congratulations! Sounds like Santa did you right!

    A better tripod.
    Light: Science and Magic.
    3 cheap flashes and cheap radio transmitter and receivers for them.

    Unless you're going to shoot in very adverse conditions, or are clumsy, the filter's optional. Your lens should have come with a hood. The shutter release could be very useful, but only if your tripod is stable enough.


    Depends on what you shoot. Personally, I tend to shoot longer, so for me it'd be more of a necessity than anything wider than 50mm.

    KEH for used gear (just remember that your lenses need to be AF-S to autofocus, AF-D won't AF on the 5000,) B&H and Calumet for the things you can't find anywhere else.

    Paul
     
  6. Ruahrc macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    #6
    You've got some good advice about some gear potentials, but don't get bogged down in equipment at the detriment of shooting experience. A body and kit lens is more than enough to get started so just go out and shoot. Gear decisions will come easier later on once you have started shooting and got a feel for what kinds of photos you like to take. That sale on the telephoto is not going to be a good deal if you never shoot faraway subjects.

    Ruahrc
     
  7. jammiefreerider macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    #7
    I bought a D5000 to recently. I found what I did to be really good. I bought a 50mm f1.8 for £55 on eBay so I could learn about playing with depth of field. With the stock lens and a 50mm you will get to learn how to use the camera/photography in general. By reading at least Digital Photography 1&2 scott kelby books youll find what you want to do and how to do it. From there you will know what to buy.

    If you bought the cam to shoot video as well (like I did) give up on it, save for a 7D and stick to stills as the rolling shutter renders video useless on the D5000. :mad:
     
  8. mst129 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    #8
    Another idea...

    The 35mm AF-S DX is probably the best choice if you want an inexpensive prime for the D5000. It costs a little more than the 50mm, but it will autofocus on your camera, which IMHO is worth it, and you can always revert to manual focus if you like. (I have a D40X and am planning to visit a camera store soon to try the 35mm out - I have heard nothing but positive things about it.) If you can find a good deal on the VR version of the 55-200, definitely consider it.
     
  9. carlgo macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #9
    The 55-200 for only a hundred bucks? Nice lens, very useful, too good a deal to pass up.

    The other lens ideas are fine, but this deal is almost too good to be true, so go for it now and deal with other issues later.

    I like a polarizer filter for some scenics, but really you have a fine camera and one or two or three lenses. That's a lot of stuff. So, maybe a class, a book... stuff to help with the artistic side of it. Or, a trip to scenic places. And there is always Aperture or Lightroom to help with the shots you do get.
     
  10. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #10
    Stop shopping and start shooting. You'll find out soon enough what's indispensible. If you've got a camera, 'standard' lens, a tripod and a cable release, you'll have the set-up that I use for 99% of my photography.

    Enjoy the learning proocess. Have fun... :)
     
  11. jammiefreerider macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    #11
    I disagree, the OP has the stock 18-55mm lens for auto focus simplicity. To learn about photography and lenses you have to use manual as much as you can. You can either spend £65 on a 50mm f1.8 or spend £150 on a 35mm f2.0. You have the added advantage of the extra stop of light as well with the 50mm.
     
  12. OrangeCuse44 macrumors 65816

    OrangeCuse44

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    #12
    The bag you are looking for would be the Crumpler 6 Million Dollar Home. I had the same criteria as you when looking for a bag and I can tell you it looks great, functions great, and will hold what you need (camera, extra lens, accessories) and is comfortable at the same time.

    Trust Doylem on this. When I first got my D90 all I wanted to do was add equipment and accessories to my arsenal, but the only way to know what you need is to take pictures after pictures. I was going to forgo the 18-105 kit lens and just pick up the 50mm prime at the outset. But, after shooting with all different focal lengths available with the kit lens, I realized I need/want a wider lens so I'm going to pick up the 35mm prime instead. I avoided paying for something that would not have suited my style but just using the kit lens and learning what I like to shoot helped me make the right choice. Best of luck.
     
  13. El Cabong macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    #13
    Those autofocus lenses come with a switch to disable it. If he's really strapped for cash (he started another thread in which he was discussing taking out a loan to buy a camera/equipment), maybe now is not the time to go blowing his money on stuff he doesn't know whether or not he needs.

    Well, that bag is hip enough for the hipsters in Williamsburg (Brooklyn, NY neighborhood where the hipster brood mother resides somewhere underground and her offspring populate the surface), so it should be hip enough for you. If you really want to look cool, just buy a regular shoulder bag (say, from Manhattan Portage, or whatever passes as trendy wherever you happen to live) and toss all your gear in it like unwanted children (maybe add a towel for padding). Generally speaking, the better the camera bag, the dorkier it looks. By the way, your current camera bag fits 3/4 of your criteria, if you don't count the looks.

    To reiterate what others have said: Stop shopping and start shooting. You probably won't need a telephoto zoom for an intro photography class. If they haven't already required you to buy a prime lens, they probably won't. A camera bag won't give you better pictures. So curb your urge to spend, and just go do some photography.

    EDIT: The Crumpler bag looks good. Go buy one!
     
  14. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #14
    I think you're mistaken- first of all, here's the big disadvantage of not being able to autofocus the cheap 50mm ever on a D5000. To get AF, they'd have to go to the AF-S version of the 50mm, which is twice the price of the 35mm DX recommended in the post you responded to. Plus, the DX 35mm is an f/1.8 lens, the FX version is f/2 and the DX lens has a better AOV for most people on a DX body than a 50mm. While manual focus is a good skill to have, it's not a requirement for a hobbyist and they'd get more overall use out of a lens they could switch into manual focus than one that they could never AF with.

    Paul
     
  15. epicwelshman macrumors 6502a

    epicwelshman

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Location:
    Nassau, Bahamas
    #15
    If I can throw my two cents in... buy nothing. You have all you need. Hell, you don't even *need* a tripod at all.

    As others have mentioned, just start shooting. You'll quickly figure out what you need.

    Leave the tripods, filters, lenses, etc. until you know how to shoot.
     
  16. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #16
    I would argue that learning to shoot off a tripod early will likely produce a better photographer, all other things being equal.

    Paul
     
  17. epicwelshman macrumors 6502a

    epicwelshman

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Location:
    Nassau, Bahamas
    #17
    You know, you may be right. I've barely used a tripod at all, mainly because I'm quite a quick, mobile, fluid shooter. Tripod experince may have made me a little more patient :)
     
  18. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #18
    Once you get past the "most of my shots suck" phase of photography, the biggest single thing you can do to improve your shots is to slow down and shoot more deliberately. Back in the olden days, we'd load up our mules with Large Format cameras, where speed just wasn't an option, or throw some Medium Format gear into the horseless carriage. Today's digital shooters lose out for not having had that experience. Not only will a tripod result in sharper pictures, but it forces you to slow down- and that *always* results in a better overall photographer- even one who runs around shooting dynamic events.

    Let me tell you, there is absolutely nothing so motivating towards really considering every single bit of detail in a scene as lugging a large view camera, film holders, tripod and light meter miles up a trail, setting up a shot, getting the camera level, figuring out your tilts and swings to get perspective and focal planes where you want them, waiting for the light to change, snapping off a shot or three, packing it all back up, hauling it all back down the trail, going into the dark room and developing your film and grabbing the loupe...

    ...THEN noticing that Coke can in the bottom right corner of the frame.

    Seriously- try this-

    Shoot every day for a full week where you're only allowed to shoot off a tripod *and* you get no more than three shots at any given location- and at least two days have to be shot more than a mile from the car or house. Try for perfection in terms of framing, subject and layout in each shot. A week is short, but it simulates the move to medium or large format enough that it'll help the way you see. Seriously, actually doing it will help- I'm positive of it.

    Paul
     
  19. jammiefreerider macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    #19
    You correct me on the DX/FX f stops. If you go with the DX though all the fiddling with the lens has to be done in the menus not just by turning the barrel which I find much quicker/easier/intuitive.

    If a 35mm or 50mm with autofocus is bought a "hobbyist" may never see the need to switch to that lens in the first place since hes got AF on his stock lens...

    For learning about photography/lenses and spending the least amount of money the 50mm f1.8 is perfect.
     
  20. epicwelshman macrumors 6502a

    epicwelshman

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Location:
    Nassau, Bahamas
    #20

    Paul, thanks so much! It's amazing - I'm a semi-pro (I guess), have been shooting almost every day for a few years, and there's ALWAYS more to learn.

    I'm going to try this.
     
  21. jrusso2009 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Location:
    Reno, NV
    #21
    Amazon Offer?

    Say, I wanted to do as you did and nail that rebate. But I cannot find it at Amazon. Any ideas?

    "Also, I'm able to get Amazon to offer the 55-200mm Nikon lens for about 110.00 after 100.00 instant rebate, which is their current promotion."

    Thanks!

    Joe in Reno:apple:
     
  22. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #22
    Um, unless the D5000 is unlike any other Nikon camera body to date, the thumbwheel is all you need to adjust to change the aperture in Program or Aperture mode. More importantly, unless you're in full manual mode, you have to turn the wheel anyway- Nikon cameras like their lenses set to the smallest aperture. After a quick Google, it looks like in M or S, you simply need to hold down the exposure adjustment button [+/-] while turning the thumbwheel. No need to go to a menu at all.

    Since turning the thumbwheel is necessary when in aperture and program modes, I find that more intuitive these days- though I shoot with higher-end bodies that also have the front command dial, I find it not much of an adjustment when I shoot with a friend's D40. On my D3x and D2x, I can do it without removing my eye from the viewfinder and instantly know what my settings are- more importantly, it works in every single mode, including full manual mode, so it's consistent no matter how you're shooting.

    The principles of exposure do not change if it's a kit lens or a prime, fast or slow, so your idea of perfect and mine are going to have to remain different.

    Finally, if the "hobbyist" is that entrenched in AF, then they're not going to put a manual-focus lens on their camera after the second week anyway.
     
  23. designguy79 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Location:
    Michigan
    #23
    Paul - do you mean "from a tripod" or "without using a tripod"? The way you phrase it, "off a tripod" could be interpreted both ways, really!

    From my point of view, I think using a tripod would be better for a beginner to help them think about composition, lighting, etc.
     
  24. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #24
    From a tripod.
     
  25. Keebler macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    #25
    i'd have 1 UV polarized filer and 1 clear filter for each lens. protects the lens glass and helps with the UV when outside.

    and a lens pen cleaner to clean the lens.

    maybe a flash, but those can be expensive.
     

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