new digital high speed camera

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by andiwm2003, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. andiwm2003 macrumors 601

    andiwm2003

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #1
    well, 1000 times shorter exposure times will change photography for sure. but it's still in early development. will take some time to trickle down to consumer level cameras....................


    Nature Magazine:

    Serial time-encoded amplified imaging for real-time
    observation of fast dynamic phenomena
    K. Goda1*, K. K. Tsia1* & B. Jalali1*
    Ultrafast real-time optical imaging is an indispensable tool for
    studying dynamical events such as shock waves1,2, chemical
    dynamics in living cells3,4, neural activity5,6, laser surgery7–9 and
    microfluidics10,11. However, conventional CCDs (charge-coupled
    devices) and their complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor
    (CMOS) counterparts are incapable of capturing fast dynamical
    processes with high sensitivity and resolution. This is due in part
    to a technological limitation—it takes time to read out the data
    from sensor arrays. Also, there is the fundamental compromise
    between sensitivity and frame rate; at high frame rates, fewer
    photons are collected during each frame—a problem that affects
    nearly all optical imaging systems. Here we report an imaging
    method that overcomes these limitations and offers frame rates
    that are at least 1,000 times faster than those of conventional
    CCDs. Our technique maps a two-dimensional (2D) image into
    a serial time-domain data stream and simultaneously amplifies the
    image in the optical domain. We capture an entire 2D image using
    a single-pixel photodetector and achieve a net image amplification
    of 25 dB (a factor of 316). This overcomes the compromise between
    sensitivity and frame rate without resorting to cooling and highintensity
    illumination. As a proof of concept, we perform continuous
    real-time imaging at a frame speed of 163 ns (a frame rate of
    6.1 MHz) and a shutter speed of 440 ps. We also demonstrate realtime
    imaging of microfluidic flow and phase-explosion effects that
    occur during laser ablation.
     
  2. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
    #2
    That is near impossible to read. :mad:

    Nature Magazine:

    Serial time-encoded amplified imaging for real-time observation of fast dynamic phenomena K. Goda1*, K. K. Tsia1* & B. Jalali1*

    Ultrafast real-time optical imaging is an indispensable tool for studying dynamical events such as shock waves1,2, chemical dynamics in living cells3,4, neural activity5,6, laser surgery7–9 and microfluidics10,11. However, conventional CCDs (charge-coupled devices) and their complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) counterparts are incapable of capturing fast dynamical processes with high sensitivity and resolution.

    This is due in part to a technological limitation—it takes time to read out the data from sensor arrays. Also, there is the fundamental compromise between sensitivity and frame rate; at high frame rates, fewer photons are collected during each frame—a problem that affects nearly all optical imaging systems.

    Here we report an imaging method that overcomes these limitations and offers frame rates that are at least 1,000 times faster than those of conventional CCDs. Our technique maps a two-dimensional (2D) image into a serial time-domain data stream and simultaneously amplifies the image in the optical domain.

    We capture an entire 2D image using a single-pixel photodetector and achieve a net image amplification of 25 dB (a factor of 316). This overcomes the compromise between sensitivity and frame rate without resorting to cooling and high intensity illumination.

    As a proof of concept, we perform continuous real-time imaging at a frame speed of 163 ns (a frame rate of 6.1 MHz) and a shutter speed of 440 ps. We also demonstrate realtime imaging of microfluidic flow and phase-explosion effects that occur during laser ablation.
     
  3. macryder macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 2, 2009
    #3
    Could you show as a sample image of that camera or a link to other site? I think in this section alone, you must provide a link for that in this section of the forum only. Thanks! :)
     
  4. t0mat0 macrumors 603

    t0mat0

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Location:
    Home
    #4
    Doing things one at a time, not in parallel, they're doing images to help look at things that change and happen fast e.g. a shock wave, activity in the brain, living cells.

    CCDs and CMOSs aren't normally able to capture fast events with a decent reolution and sensitivity (i.e.able to take pictures in low level of light = more sensitive - quicker the image, less light is captured for it)

    The bit that's the hard to comprehend is the

    New technique
    By using a a single-pixel photodetector they can get an entire 2D image with decent sensitivity. They showed they could do continuous
    real-time imaging at a frame speed of 6,000,000 or so frames a second.

    (163 ns (a frame rate of 6.1 MHz) and a shutter speed of 440 ps. )

    Will try and have a look

    For those looking - there are some decent v. high number of frames per second pro and normal consumer level digital cameras out - maybe not image cells or shockwaves, but definitely do slow-mos of things (search gizmodo slow-mo or similar - can't find link at moment)
     

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