new imac, avi size more than it is .. ?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by s3o0d, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. s3o0d macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    #1
    hi so i just got a new 21.5 inch imac a few days ago, and i used migration assistant to move everything from my macbook. it displays .avi files that are really 350 mb as 366 mb. why is this happening ? and even when i download new ones that are 350 mb they show up as 366 mb. before i used the migration assistant i used this plug in for quicktime called Perian on it when it was brand new, but i think its erased now cuz i transferred all my data. could this be the cause ?
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    Sep 7, 2008
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    forlod bygningen
    #2
  3. s3o0d thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    #3
    but wouldnt that decrease the file size, instead of increasing it ....
     
  4. TheBritishBloke macrumors 68030

    TheBritishBloke

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    Jul 21, 2009
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    United Kingdom
  5. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #5
    No. Example: 350 MB = 358,400 KB (350*1024) = 367,001,600 B (350*1024*1024). As SL does not use 1024 as multiplication factor, and uses 1000 instead, 367,001,600 gets divided by 1000 to get to 367,001 KB and again by 1000 to get to 367 MB.

    And again, the file size is still the same in bytes, just how the OS reports it to you is different. While the file is 367,001,600 Bytes in Mac OS X 10.5 and Mac OS X 10.6, it will be reported as 350MB in 10.5, but 10.6 reports it as being 367MB in size.

    To find out how big the files in question are in Bytes, select one of them, press Command + I and see for yourself.
     
  6. talmy macrumors 601

    talmy

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    Location:
    Oregon
    #6
    This confusion has been around for as long as there has been binary computer (which is a LONG time!). Memory is most conveniently designed and built in sizes that are powers of 2. For convenience 2^10 bytes, which is 1,024 bytes, is called a kilobyte even though it is slightly larger. Likewise a megabyte is 2^20 bytes, and is more than a million bytes (1,048,576).

    However building disk drives doesn't rely on powers of 2 and disk drive sizes have always been stated in decimal terms, mainly a megabyte is 1,000,000 bytes.

    The difference has been confusing as people would buy computers with a disk drive that reported a size less than they purchased since file sizes were also in binary kB or MB. So with Snow Leopard, Apple started reporting everything in decimal, which would eliminate the confusion and perhaps make people feel better that 1GB of RAM now reports as 1.074 GB. :)
     

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