New Mac Air purchased in Nepal, How do I register it

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by TeslaTesla, Jun 21, 2015.

  1. TeslaTesla macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Location:
    Byron Bay, NSW, Australia
    #1
    Greetings, I just purchased a new Mac Air here in Nepal but when I go to register it the apple website does not recognise the serial number. I think I was on the AppleCare page, maybe I was on the wrong page.
    Can I register this online? I don't want to pay for an Apple Care subscription, just want to register it for warranty purposes.


    Thank you
    Tesla
     
  2. charlyham macrumors regular

    charlyham

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
  3. Mrbobb macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    #3
    Did you purchase it from an authorized dealer?
     
  4. TeslaTesla thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Location:
    Byron Bay, NSW, Australia
    #4
    according to the Mac worldwide dealer page, there are no official dealers in Nepal, however I bought it from the only shop in Pokhara that had mac stuff. They seem to be legit.
    Thanks all, i have used the support link provided above to provide proof of purchase info. Hopefully all sorted.
     
  5. MRrainer macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Location:
    Zurich, Switzerland
    #5
    Am I the only one being amazed of the fact that you can buy a recent MBA in a shop in Nepal?
    According to http://www.apple.com/macbook-air/specs.html the maximum operating altitude is 10000 feet.
    Does it void your warranty if you use it at the Everest Base Camp?
    I've never done high-altitude climbing myself, but I believe few would carry it much beyond the Base Camp anyway.
    Though, it would probably get you a few seconds of fame at a keynote if you carried it to the top...
     
  6. motrek macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2012
    #6
    Makes me wonder what the failure mode is for high altitude... I could understand if MBAs had spinning disks, the air would be too thin to support the read/write head. But with no moving parts other than a little fan, hmm...
     
  7. MRrainer macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Location:
    Zurich, Switzerland
    #7
    That said, the fan has to move the hot air out. If the air is too thin (high altitude), that doesn't work too well anymore.
    As such, the life expectancy of the fans decreases because (I assume) they need to spin faster.

    Now, with a rMacBook, there are really no moving parts anymore - still, it sports the same altitude limitations as the other notebooks in Apple's portfolio (just checked).

    Though I will probably never need it (I still dream of doing a bike-tour in Ladakh - over 18k ft), I hope that Apple can address this at some point. Just to satisfy my curiosity.
    ;-)
     

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