New Macbook pro gets really cold when not in use?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by digitallegend, May 18, 2015.

  1. digitallegend macrumors member

    digitallegend

    Joined:
    May 18, 2015
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #1
    i bought my first macbook (13' 2015) and its gets really cold when I'm not using it, like night time. so in the morning its freezing cold. but when i start using it's running normal. its summer here in bc canada so if anything it should be getting hot not cold.
    i previously had a hp laptop for 3 years and never had this problem.
    i am worried about the batteries bcoz i know cold temperature shortens battery life
    is this normal? i was thinking about buying a case or a sleeve. would that solve it?
    sorry i don't have specific temperatures.
     
  2. Kissmyne macrumors 6502

    Kissmyne

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2015
    #2
    When I am not using my Macbook Pro it will get pretty cold after a relatively short period of time, I would say this is normal behavior based on the materials involved in the overall build of the Macbook Pro. And as long as you keep your Macs environment within these temperature ranges(per Apple) you should be fine.

    Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
    Storage temperature: –13° to 113° F (–25° to 45° C)
     
  3. digitallegend thread starter macrumors member

    digitallegend

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    May 18, 2015
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    Vancouver
    #3
    the operating temp and the storage is definitely between what apple recommends.
    but what makes it get really cold?
     
  4. TheIguana macrumors 6502a

    TheIguana

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    Sep 26, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    #4
    Physics 101: heat transfer to the environment around it...
     
  5. Kissmyne macrumors 6502

    Kissmyne

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    Apr 21, 2015
    #5
    Without getting into the thermodynamics discussion potentially involved here, metal objects in general conduct/transfer temperature faster then most other materials, therefore a metal chassis will heat and cool(dissipate heat) faster then a non metal object. Also aluminum is one of the best energy dissipating metals.

    This behavior is normal for your Mac, don't fret on it for too long. Enjoy your new mac.
     
  6. digitallegend thread starter macrumors member

    digitallegend

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    May 18, 2015
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    #6
    thank you
    its just that for the amount of money i spent on it, it has to be perfect !
     
  7. PaulWog Suspended

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2011
    #7
    The Macbook Pro doesn't get any colder than a plastic laptop does when you turn either off. When you touch the metal of the Macbook Pro, heat transfers from your body to the Macbook Pro much more quickly than it would to something like plastic. You perceive the Macbook Pro to be "cold." In actuality, you are perceiving the rate of heat transfer, rather than the temperature of the Macbook Pro.

    You spent a bunch of money on a unibody laptop. If you throw a case over it, that defeats some of the purpose (and price premium), but to each his own.
     
  8. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    #8
    It is. Actually, being a little on the cold side is a good thing for a computer. So, don't worry about it.

    As for cold and batteries: You have to be well below freezing for there to be any negative effects. And even in the case of cold, you won't do permanent damage to a battery due to exposure to cold. It MIGHT not work in the extreme cold, but slowly warming it back up will bring the battery's functionality back.

    It's overheating that will permanently kill a battery.
     
  9. gngan macrumors 68000

    gngan

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    MacWorld
    #9
    Seriously? It's totally un-necessary to create a thread saying that my mac is too cold.

    Let's say I've spent the same amount of money and I like it to be cold hence; it's perfect for me. Are you implying that Apple should even customize the temperature for every single owner? Nothing is perfect. Your perfect is different than my perfect. Come on, be realistic.

    You bought such expensive laptop as what it is....not the other way around. Your logic is messed up.
     
  10. eastamherstbias macrumors 6502

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    Mar 18, 2012
    #10
    Ha I thought the same thing....
     
  11. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #11
    Unless you bend the laws of physics it can't get colder than ambient temp...the rest is perception from the metal feel vs plastic of most other laptops.

    Nothing to worry about. At all.
     
  12. nateofmelb macrumors regular

    nateofmelb

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    Burn City, Australia
  13. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    Apr 27, 2010
    Location:
    Aarhus, Denmark
    #13
    - Your comment is unnecessary. The OP wasn't saying that the machine was too cold for his liking; he was asking whether something was wrong with it since he perceived it to be colder than other laptops.
    And I'm quite sure he doesn't expect Apple to manufacture each machine from different materials in order to match the thermal properties that each customer prefers...
     
  14. michaelsviews macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    #14
    Keep in mind that other laptops are not made from solid aluminum like a Macbook and up are. I Have not looked into a PC laptop since switching from a PC back in 2008, no reason I'm using the best IMHO.

    Return it and go back to HP if your not totally happy with it
     
  15. digitallegend thread starter macrumors member

    digitallegend

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    May 18, 2015
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    Vancouver
    #15
    I'm not trolling, maybe i overreacted. anyway thx everyone for their input.
     
  16. cookies! macrumors 6502

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    Jul 3, 2011
    #16
    It's a physical property of aluminum, and it is exceptional at transmitting heat. Your laptop is fine.
     
  17. srshaw macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2011
    #17
    This makes for an excellent demonstaration of conduction. You get two dishes, one plastic and one metal but otherwise look the same. Ask a student to touch each, and they will say the metal one feels colder. You then put an ice cube on each, on the metal one that felt colder the ice melts quickly, the plastic one stays frozen.

    Good conductors will always feel cold to touch even though they are in reality at ambiant room temperature.
     
  18. pshifrin macrumors 6502

    pshifrin

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    #18
    Interesting, partially related observation:

    I'm up in the mountains this week for work and my 2014 rMBP 15 2.8/16 was left running in a non-winterized building overnight where the temps got into the low 40s. I ran geekbench 64 and it scored just over 15000 and it usually in the low 14000s. Guess a cold laptop gave the CPU more room to throttle up.
     
  19. digitallegend thread starter macrumors member

    digitallegend

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    May 18, 2015
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #19
    that is crazy. i thought it would stop working in that extreme temp.
     
  20. walkie macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    #20
    Oh my god after lots of people complaining about overheating on their MBP's finally someone complains about being too cold :eek:
     
  21. digitallegend thread starter macrumors member

    digitallegend

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    May 18, 2015
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #21
    thx
     

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