New MBP but performing really slowly

heparinsulfate

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 11, 2013
2
0
Hi all,


I'm new to the mac world, purchased my first MBP in March earlier this year. I believe its the older version not the latest one with speakers at the side. I downloaded a few programmes like keynote and pages and bittorrent and skype but after awhile i realise my computer is starting to lag. Like Finder can sometimes take 7 seconds to open up? Opening pages takes maybe 10-15seconds? Can anyone tell me what's going on? I checked my activity monitor its showing me that my free memory is fluctuating around 500mb. I have 4GB ram in this computer.

Appreciate all help!
:)
 

bbishop93

macrumors regular
Jun 22, 2011
145
0
Well sounds like you have an HDD which is slow in general but maybe that combined with a virus? What sort of things have u been downloading through BitTorrent?
 

heparinsulfate

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 11, 2013
2
0
hi bishop,


i've been downloading music, movies, and softwares. i've downloaded some free anti virus programmes but they dont show any virus. How do i check if there is a virus?


Cheers
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,379
704
hi bishop,


i've been downloading music, movies, and softwares. i've downloaded some free anti virus programmes but they dont show any virus. How do i check if there is a virus?
Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 12 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). 3rd party antivirus apps are not necessary to keep a Mac malware-free, as long as a user practices safe computing, as described in the following link.
Read the What security steps should I take? section of the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ for tips on practicing safe computing.

If you're having performance issues, this may help:
 

bbishop93

macrumors regular
Jun 22, 2011
145
0
Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 12 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). 3rd party antivirus apps are not necessary to keep a Mac malware-free, as long as a user practices safe computing, as described in the following link.
Read the What security steps should I take? section of the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ for tips on practicing safe computing.

If you're having performance issues, this may help:
Great post, and well said. It is a common misconception that "Macs dont get viruses" and its just not true. Sure specifically to the OS not as of yet I have heard of one in the past year but nothing since. However, anything that uses Java(which is pretty much everything) is prone to get a virus, especially links in emails, facebook, and more commonly in torrents. I suggest if you're gonna download anything make sure it's from a reputable source or scan it first to make sure.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,379
704
Great post, and well said. It is a common misconception that "Macs dont get viruses" and its just not true.
Yes, it is true. Macs can get viruses, but they don't, since none exist in the wild.
However, anything that uses Java(which is pretty much everything) is prone to get a virus, especially links in emails, facebook, and more commonly in torrents. I suggest if you're gonna download anything make sure it's from a reputable source or scan it first to make sure.
The Java exploits, email attachments and torrent malware you're referring to are trojans, not viruses. Read the FAQ I posted to learn the difference.
 

bbishop93

macrumors regular
Jun 22, 2011
145
0
Yes, it is true. Macs can get viruses, but they don't, since none exist in the wild.

The Java exploits, email attachments and torrent malware you're referring to are trojans, not viruses. Read the FAQ I posted to learn the difference.
Yeah I know I was just using in general terms, for me trojans rootkits, backdoors, malware, all just fall under my general term of virus. It's much easier when explaining to people when they're like what is a rootkit? So I'm just like it's a type of virus, easy way out.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,379
704
Yeah I know I was just using in general terms, for me trojans rootkits, backdoors, malware, all just fall under my general term of virus. It's much easier when explaining to people when they're like what is a rootkit? So I'm just like it's a type of virus, easy way out.
I understand that many do that, but the accurate term is malware. Viruses, trojans, worms, etc., are all various forms of malware. It helps to learn the accurate terms so you can educate others who don't know better.
 

Krazy Bill

macrumors 68030
Dec 21, 2011
2,985
3
Before the brilliant tech wizards around here have you do a clean install, buy a SSD, upgrade your RAM (while throwing salt over a shoulder)...

...first, and at the risk of insulting your Mac prowess, when did you reboot last?

...secondly, what do you have running at log in? (System Preferences > Users & Groups > Log in items). You obviously have something consuming all that memory and most likely CPU resources. Might be worthwhile to create a new account to see if the old "pep" is back under that account.