New Network Problem Any Suggestions?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by eljanitor, Mar 11, 2014.

  1. eljanitor macrumors 6502

    eljanitor

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2011
    #1
    We recently switched to TWC Broadband because our previous ISP was blowing it, and we were tired of DSL too. We now are using TWC Broadband, but it seems that possibly our D-Link Router, and access point are having issues.

    We have 4- 6 Macs, and 1 PC on our network
    We are Running: Mountain Lion, Lion Server, and Windows 8.
    1 D-Link DIR-855 router
    1 D-Link DAP-1522 access point

    Our new network problems are:

    All computers have had various browsers stalling, Netflix buffering on the Smart TV's and our Wireless connection on all machines disconnects occasionally. I have disabled the TWC Wi-FI in the ARRIS Router/Gateway we were given, and bridged our D-Link DIR-857 to the ARRIS Router/ Gateway. I upgraded the Firmware to the latest version in the D-Link Router and access Point. I just had to go walk over to the access point and power cycle it again to get my connection back in this area 30 minutes ago, for the second time in 4 days.

    When we had DSL from the other ISP, our D-Link equipment never had to be power cycled, or reset. It was always a line Problem, or bad modem. Since the changeover this is becoming an issue. Any suggestions would be helpful at this point.
     
  2. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #2
    First of all, the best way to do this is to bridge the modem and have the main D-Link run as the router doing NAT and DHCP. Second of all, have you tried connecting to the modem directly via Ethernet and running a speed test? I recommend speedtest.net. Now run the speed test from behind the D-Link and all the access points.

    What package did you order with your new ISP? Also, what speeds did you order and hopefully receive when you had DSL?

    Try running the cable from the LAN port on the modem/gateway to the WAN port on the first D-Link and ensure it is doing DHCP and NAT (E.g. not bridge mode). This is double NAT and can cause issues so I recommend you use this as a troubleshooting step solely. Some risks with Double NAT is higher ping times (latency), some applications not working, and ports not working for forwarding.

    In my experience with Netgear and Apple networking equipment. APs crash routers when they are bridged to a modem. If that makes sense, you shouldn't have a bridge behind a bridge. Sometimes when DHCP requests come across it can crash the first bridge. If running double NAT fixes the issue with needing to power cycle the D-Link equipment, then you just need to set your modem to bridge mode.

    Now, as for your bandwidth issues, troubleshooting poor performance is a tricky thing to pin point. I recommend testing both the modem with and without bridge mode enabled and running speed tests. If they are better in bridge mode, then your gateway modem has extremely poor NAT performance. Then that is simply a low-quality piece of equipment. If it is the same with or without bridge mode then you have quality issues with either your modem, coax wiring, coax splitters, and/or the ISP lines. Start with a fresh modem from the ISP, and ask them to check the signals on the line. You need to be concerned especially with the signal to noise ratio. Don't worry if you have no clue what I'm talking about, the ISP can fix that.

    You may want to replace the coax splitters in your home. They are generally gold or silver colored boxes with 3-10 jacks on them. To begin start by testing the modem in another room. Most ISPs don't care where you place the modem in your home!

    Hope this helps at least get the D-Link drops resolved. You may need to call your dear friends over at your ISP to test bridge mode.
     
  3. unplugme71 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    #3
    I always recommend placing the modem near the cable that comes into your home to reduce latency and other devices adding noise into the line. Usually it is run into your basement or utility side of the house.

    By time you run wiring inside the house with a bunch of splits, the end result is usually poor signal for Internet use. TV may not notice as much.

    Moving my parents modem from the top floor to ground level increased our speedtest greatly, reduced latency, and StN ratio.
     
  4. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #4
    Got to love splitters. Unfortunately, the OP describes a problem which has nothing to do with the cable input, the lockups of the D-Link gear. However, your post may be beneficial in reducing latency.
     
  5. unplugme71 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    #5
    Depends - he mentions two problems.

    The stalling and buffering issues can be due to a poor signal in the cable wiring - either too many splitters, too long of a cable run, interference, using UPS with cable routed through, etc. Since he switched ISPs, instead of using a TEL line he is now using cable. I'd have TWC check the line.

    The other issue - wifi. Is the icon for wifi showing it being dropped - or does the wifi connection actually stay but data is being lost over the wifi network? You might want to try using different wifi channels or reduce wireless interference. One of the devices is causing issues.
     
  6. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #6
    I wonder if the OP is actually still checking this thread.
     
  7. unplugme71 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    #7
    doubtful

    Most people post across multiple forums and search on google. They find the answer, never report back what fixed it or such. Then each thread becomes useless to search results.

    This is why I don't even bother searching on forums.
     
  8. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #8
    If I go down my "Participated" list in Tapatalk, a good 95% of them all say Altemose as the final poster.
     
  9. eljanitor, Mar 27, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014

    eljanitor thread starter macrumors 6502

    eljanitor

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2011
    #9
    Our router is bridged to the TWC gateway/ router. if I disable NAT on the TWC ARRIS gateway I loose the ability to view webpages, If I disable NAT or DHCP services in my D-Link router, I get the same DNS server error. So I find it best to leave our D-Link router bridged to the TWC ARRIS gateway using default settings ( just a simple bridge) this way as it causes the least amount of issues.

    *note There is only 1 DHCP server for the network so I don't have conflicts*

    So now it physically it looks something like this:

    • Internet packets (from ISP) via COAX to > ARRIS GATEWAY/ ROUTER (from ISP-TWC) >via cat5e cable to D-Link Router (ours) to >via cat5e cables to { a few Mac Computers, iphones ipads etc.....} Gigabit Ethernet switch (ours) > to D-Link access point (ours) to wireless computers in that area.

    **All network equipment switch, access point router is connected by cat5e cable. Some computers connect via cat 5e cable too based on need.**

    • A day or two ago the ARRIS gateway dropped out and it wouldn't re-connect for hours. It was TWC having problems no cable, no nada. I noticed that the our access point was freaking out when that happened, and sometimes wouldn't let any computer even establish a handshake with it intermittently during that period of time.

    After our 3 hour outage the other day, we called TWC our ISP who sent a tech to come look after it came back up. I wasn't here when he visited someone else was, but I was told,"He did some things, and said everything looks good now." Before he left.

    We'll see what happens over the next few days.

    To answer another question though:

    •Speeds as of now are: 23.53Mbps Down and 5.72Mbps up. TWC Broadband. out of 30 Mbps down
    •When we had DSL it was 1Mbs down usually and 0.30Mbps up out of 3.0 Mbps down.
     
  10. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #10
    Generally, ISPs argue that the speeds are "up to" in the packages. For example, Comcast offers a package where you will get speeds up to 25 Mbps. Some people get 20-24 and some get 25-30 on that package.

    If the D-Link is still dropping, then call up your ISP (TWC) and tell them you want the gateway set to bridge mode. Some say a bridge behind a bridge works, but it generally crashes my setup. Give it a shot! Then reset both the D-Links.

    That will pass the public IP like a simple modem to the D-Link to handle.
     
  11. unplugme71 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    #11
    True, I rarely, if ever, get the speeds they claim but I do get close. However, there was a time when TWC was only pushing 10-15 on my 50Mbps plan and that pissed me off. I called and they gave me 100Mbps for the price of their Standard plan and fixed the speed issue.

    Now that I moved, I have SureWest (Consolidated Comm) and frankly I hate the company. Compared to Comcast and TWC, it's like dealing with a 10 year old kid. Information is scarce, they have techs that blame my equipment, takes forever to get stuff done (took 2 weeks to upgrade my speed when I called about their offer).
     
  12. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #12
    We are on a 50 Mbps package and we get 58 down and 11 up. This is with Comcast/Xfinity.
     
  13. unplugme71 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    #13
    Comcast is pretty good for their residential. I've dealt with a lot of issues at my parents. However, my previous job we've had Comcast Business. They run a solid cable directly from the pole to the office - not sure what size, but the cable is probably 3-4x thicker, logs better signal, etc. We were on their 100Mbps plan and got 100Mbps steady. Never had connection drops or anything, even if residential was done. They must run a dedicated line for business users. We even shared the same cable with 11 phone lines, ZERO issues.
     
  14. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #14
    I am not saying Comcast offers poor service. What I am saying is that their customer service is lacking, old residential lines are rarely replaced or repaired, there is a wide range of speeds you may get depending on location on the line, and the atrocious equipment they use. All in all, they are a great ISP, but if you live in the middle of nowhere on a line with a couple of houses, you are the least of their issues and are treated as such.
     

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