new to Apple TV.. How does it work

fjs08

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jun 25, 2003
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I'm new to Apple TV. How does it work?
Does it hook to cable, ??? I'm kinda lost but I'm interested.
What will it do for me that my current cable won't??
Sorry for such a basic question.
Thx.
Frank
 

Nov 28, 2010
22,668
27
located
Apple TV is a tiny entertainment powerhouse that plays the content you love from iTunes, Netflix, YouTube, and your favorite sports leagues on your widescreen TV. In up to 1080p HD. Just plug it in and discover a whole world of movies, TV shows, photos, music, and more. You’re gonna need a better couch.
directly from
 

fjs08

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jun 25, 2003
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>>Just plug it in and discover a whole world of movies, TV shows, photos, music, and more. <<

Into my TV?? How does it stream into my TV.. along w cable; or separately??
Like it's a wi fi box or something??? Again, sorry, but I don't understand a lot of this techy stuff.

Frank
 
Nov 28, 2010
22,668
27
located
>>Just plug it in and discover a whole world of movies, TV shows, photos, music, and more. <<

Into my TV?? How does it stream into my TV.. along w cable; or separately??
Like it's a wi fi box or something??? Again, sorry, but I don't understand a lot of this techy stuff.

Frank
It streams content from an internet connection and connects to your TV via HDMI input. Your cable connection has nothing to do with the Apple TV.
 

fjs08

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Original poster
Jun 25, 2003
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>>A member from June 2003, with <,

I said I was NEW to Apple TV. Not mac's.

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>>content from an internet connection and connects to your TV via HDMI input. Your cable connection <<

But my internet connection IS from my cable company. I have Comcast internet and cable TV. Are you saying I disconnect my cable from my TV and I get the connection for Apple TV the same way I connect to the internet on my MAC?? I'm still confused.

Frank
 

whooleytoo

macrumors 604
Aug 2, 2002
6,559
628
Cork, Ireland.
I'm new to Apple TV. How does it work?
Does it hook to cable, ??? I'm kinda lost but I'm interested.
What will it do for me that my current cable won't??
Sorry for such a basic question.
Thx.
Frank
The ATV connects to your home (Wifi, or wired) network, and plugs into your TV/home theatre via HDMI / optical audio cable.

There are 3 main usage scenarios:
- You can listen to/watch streamed music & video from a few internet sources (iTunes, iCloud, Youtube, Netflix, Vimeo etc) on your TV/home theatre.
- If you have music & videos in iTunes on your home Mac/PC, you can watch them on your TV/home theatre. (This is Home Sharing).
- If you're watching a video or listening to music on a iPad/iPhone at home, you can 'push' that onto the TV/home theatre (this is Airplay).

You can use the physical remote device for controlling the AppleTV, but IMO using the Remote app on an iPad or iPhone is far better for navigating a lot of content.
 

IeU

macrumors member
May 1, 2011
93
5
The ATV connects to your home (Wifi, or wired) network, and plugs into your TV/home theatre via HDMI / optical audio cable.

There are 3 main usage scenarios:
- You can listen to/watch streamed music & video from a few internet sources (iTunes, iCloud, Youtube, Netflix, Vimeo etc) on your TV/home theatre.
- If you have music & videos in iTunes on your home Mac/PC, you can watch them on your TV/home theatre. (This is Home Sharing).
- If you're watching a video or listening to music on a iPad/iPhone at home, you can 'push' that onto the TV/home theatre (this is Airplay).

You can use the physical remote device for controlling the AppleTV, but IMO using the Remote app on an iPad or iPhone is far better for navigating a lot of content.
Ahhh . . .

So if i want to watch TV (to watch news for example), i have to turn off ATV?
 

fjs08

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jun 25, 2003
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>>The ATV connects to your home (Wifi, or wired) network, and plugs into your TV/home theatre via HDMI / optical audio cable.<<

Ahhh... that makes it easier to understand what it is all about.
Thx.
Frank
 
Nov 28, 2010
22,668
27
located
Ahhh . . .

So if i want to watch TV (to watch news for example), i have to turn off ATV?
No.
Apple TV connects via HDMI, meaning you can use your remote to switch between the inputs and thus select one of the HDMI ports as well as all your channels.
 

Gjwilly

macrumors 68030
May 1, 2011
2,872
513
SF Bay Area
Ahhh . . .

So if i want to watch TV (to watch news for example), i have to turn off ATV?
Assuming your TV has multiple inputs you can have the ATV hooked to one input and your TV signal hooked to the other.
Then just switch inputs.

OOPs... beaten to the punch
 

whooleytoo

macrumors 604
Aug 2, 2002
6,559
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Cork, Ireland.
Ahhh . . .

So if i want to watch TV (to watch news for example), i have to turn off ATV?
No, you shouldn't have to turn it off, just switch the source on your TV or AV receiver. Your ATV plugs into one HDMI port, your cable TV into another, you can switch just by selecting the relevant input.

In my case, I have games consoles, cable, AppleTV all using HDMI, but only 2 ports on my AV receiver. So I bought a cheap HDMI switch with an IR remote; and everything plugs into that, then I have one cable going into my AV receiver and one from that to the TV. To switch from cable TV <-> AppleTV <-> 360 <-> PS3, I only ever have to use the HDMI switch remote.
 

steviem

macrumors 68020
May 26, 2006
2,218
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New York, Baby!
>>A member from June 2003, with <,

I said I was NEW to Apple TV. Not mac's.

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>>content from an internet connection and connects to your TV via HDMI input. Your cable connection <<

But my internet connection IS from my cable company. I have Comcast internet and cable TV. Are you saying I disconnect my cable from my TV and I get the connection for Apple TV the same way I connect to the internet on my MAC?? I'm still confused.

Frank
The answer I want to give is - don't worry about it, don't waste your $99.

This is the real world use case for AppleTV:

Firstly, connecting it up.
-You need a flat screen TV with a spare HDMI port (and an HDMI cable). You don't want to disconnect your cable box.
-Yes, you need a network connection, as you say, you get it from your cable provider, but all you are getting from them in the instance of the AppleTV is internet.

What the Apple TV is good for:
-if you have an iPad or iPhone, you'll be able to stream just about all content from your device to the Apple TV.
-if you have a Netflix subscription, however from your questioning, I doubt you do - not a problem, not everyone wants or cares about that.
-if you have bought music or video from iTunes, if you have anything in your iTunes library that you want to see on your TV.
-One case I had last weekend was a new movie was released on iTunes before in cinemas. Great for me, I'd rather rent it for $9.99 and watch it in the comfort of my own home without the distractions of idiots in a cinema or with the stupidly inflated price of popcorn/candy.

As you said, you don't see much point in it as you're already getting video from your cable provider. I ave the basic TV package with Verizon though, and don't want to buy any extra stuff on their service, I much prefer iTunes.
 

fjs08

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jun 25, 2003
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>>don't worry about it, don't waste your $99. <<

That's funny. But I appreciate your candidness.
Now that I hear all this, I'm not sure I actually watch enough TV to make it worth while. Thx for the information.

Frank
 

whtrbt7

macrumors 65816
Jun 8, 2011
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I'm new to Apple TV as well and I was wondering if all content is streamed via the network. How exactly is ATV different from let's say me running my own DLNA server? Also how well does it stream content since I'm running almost at the brink of my Gigabit connection with DLNA streaming. I was hoping to switch to ATVs from Mac minis but wasn't sure how well that would go.
 

whooleytoo

macrumors 604
Aug 2, 2002
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Cork, Ireland.
I'm new to Apple TV as well and I was wondering if all content is streamed via the network. How exactly is ATV different from let's say me running my own DLNA server? Also how well does it stream content since I'm running almost at the brink of my Gigabit connection with DLNA streaming. I was hoping to switch to ATVs from Mac minis but wasn't sure how well that would go.
Unless you're playing uncompressed 1080p video sourced from somewhere, I doubt if you're using a full 1Gb of bandwidth; perhaps it's more likely it's the DLNA client, or the source hard drive that's the limiting factor?

I've used an Xbox 360 and PS3 as DLNA clients, and both are a bit of a pain if you're browsing through a lot of content. I have all my music & videos on my Mac in the study, and use the ATV to play it on the TV/surround sound system in the living room; using the iPad's Remote app to browse/control playback. It's a really nice solution for listening to my music library.

The ATV uses a lot less power in standby, wakes very quickly from standby, is completely quiet (compared to the 360, yikes!) and plays 720p and 1080p (downscaled to 720p on my ATV2) perfectly.

I suppose the biggest drawback is that the ATV supports so few formats, but then those other consoles don't support many either.
 

dotheDVDeed

macrumors member
Jul 13, 2007
74
9
whooleytoo

One thing you left out in your comparison of DLNA/Xbox to iTunes/AppleTV is that you need a PC or a G4(+) Mac running iTunes.

DLNA can be served with a NAS (Networked Attached Storage) Drive.

TIM
 
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whooleytoo

macrumors 604
Aug 2, 2002
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628
Cork, Ireland.
whooleytoo

One thing you left out in your comparison of DLNA/Xbox to iTunes/AppleTV is that you need a PC or a G4(+) Mac running iTunes.

DLNA can be served with a NAS (Networked Attached Storage) Drive.

TIM
Thanks, that's a good point. I have an old Mac while I schedule to boot up around the time I get home from work, and shut down late at night so it's no real fuss for me, but for others this could be a real inconvenience; and thus a DLNA server & client would be a better solution.