new to mac world

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by rickster360, Nov 26, 2009.

  1. rickster360 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    #1
    hello, just purchased a imac and was surprised how much they came down in price "thank you lord" now for my questions: 1. i have a 3.08 ghz with 8gb of memory with 1tb hard drive and ati radeon hd 4670 256mb. i mainly use the computer to do my finances on line and in leisure time play a little online poker. is it safe for me to play poker without a anti virus on a imac? and from what i read it sounds to me the only way i would get a virus is if i am asked for my administrative password from a web site? also, i watched a video clip about my new computer and it stated that when i am on a web site and i am downloading one thing if the site is dishonest the computer will tell me if its downloading an application rather than what i think im downloading is that right? thank you.
     
  2. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #2
    There are so few viruses for the MacOS that the only thing you need to worry about are files downloading that you didn't want to.

    Enjoy.
     
  3. Tactics macrumors newbie

    Tactics

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    #3
    Well

    There are viruses for Mac, but most are for linux. Yet im pretty sure Mac are so fast that it wouldnt affect the speed of your computer.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    None, actually.
    False.

    A computer virus is a computer program that can copy itself and infect a computer. The term "virus" is also commonly but erroneously used to refer to other types of malware, adware, and spyware programs that do not have the reproductive ability.

    From Symantec:
    As of this time, there are NO viruses in the wild that affect current Mac OS X. In the past, there have been a few viruses that ran on older versions of the Mac operating system, but no longer.

    There are, as of this time, trojans that can affect Mac OS X, but these must be downloaded and installed by the user, which involves entering the user's administrator password. Trojans can easily be avoided by the user exercising common sense and caution when installing applications. A common source of trojans is pirated software, typically downloaded from bit torrent sites.

    Having virus protection software on your Mac is pointless, as far as protecting your Mac from viruses, since AV software can't detect a virus that doesn't exist. It is possible to have a file reside on your hard drive that contains a Windows virus, but since a Windows virus (program) can't run in native Mac OS X, it would be harmless to your Mac. Some choose to run AV on their Mac to scan for Windows viruses, so the Mac user can't pass a virus-infected file to a Windows user. IMHO, a Windows user should be protected by their own AV software, so the burden of protection lies with the Windows user.
     
  5. rickster360 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    #5
    thank you all

    i am now convinced i made a good choice on buying an imac. thx again.
     
  6. EndlessMac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    #6
    If you interact with Windows users for business then I think it would be a good idea to get rid of Windows viruses off your computer. You don't want to be the person who gives your boss a Windows virus.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    As I said, any Windows user should have AV protection running on their own PC. If they don't, it's their problem.
     
  8. EndlessMac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    #8
    I heard what you said and I personally disagree. Tell your boss that or tell your clients that if you are the one that gave them viruses. It's a good way to loss your job or clientele. I personally don't think that's a smart thing to do.

    Yes, I agree that they should have their own AV but the end result doesn't give you a good reputation. Trying to keep your job is your problem and not theirs in a business environment. Would you not be angry if you went to an online shopping website and it gave you a virus? And how would you like the attitude if they said it was your problem and not theirs? Like I said earlier I believe it's important in a business environment. For average users then yes I agree it's not their responsibility but it is nice not giving your friends and families PC viruses.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    I understand your viewpoint, but if you really want to be "nice" to your friends/family/business contacts, then don't send them any files that you downloaded or received from other Windows users unless you know they're prudent enough to have AV protection. The only Windows users I share files with are ones I know for certain have AV protection. Even then, the only files I send are either ones created on my Mac, which can't have viruses, or ones they send to me first, so they know they're clean. Therefore, it's not possible for me to send a virus to a Windows user.

    With such great free AV apps such as AVG, there's simply no excuse for a Windows user to be unprotected.
     
  10. EndlessMac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    #10
    Ideally that would be the way to go but sometimes you receive files from Windows users that you have to then review, update, and forward to others. Clients give me files all the time and if it's a large group collaboration then there is a lot of trading of files. In this situation you are forced to pass along these files and you are trusting that each person has AV and also hasn't given you a virus to pass along. You don't have the luxury to select who you will send or receive files from because it is a collaboration.

    Even with all the AV options on the Windows side, not everyone using Windows has AV which is part of the reason why viruses are so common in the PC environment. I still think it's important in a business situation that you have AV but it's not as important in a casual user environment.
     
  11. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    #11
    In a business situation, none of the PC users should have infected files. It's not up to a virus free platform to do the work for PC users.
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #12
    I agree. I support hundreds of corporate clients and one of my requirements is that they are responsible for their own AV protection. My consulting contract specifically states that I'm not responsible for any viruses they contract, as they should have AV protection enabled. Of course, being corporate clients, I've never encountered a business that doesn't have some form of AV protection on all their company PCs. It's mostly the casual, inexperienced home users that are foolish enough to run without AV.
     
  13. EndlessMac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    #13
    That is just what I'm dealing with. I'm not talking about large corporate businesses because they usually know enough to have AV. I'm talking about casual clients because my clients are the general public. They should know better but they don't always.
     

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