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DynamicFuzz

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 20, 2019
9
0
United Kingdom
Good evening guys,

Just stumbled across this site and am looking to get some advice from you all regarding my Macbook Pro.

I have made the decision to attempt the much researched new Hard drive and RAM upgrade for my Macbook Pro Mid 2010 model. I dont have a huge amount of confidence carrying out the work and have done alot of research to try and squash and fears that i will break it.

I have the following system:

Macbook Pro
13 Inch Mid 2010 - MacbookPro 7,1
2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
4GB 1067 MHz DDR3.

* At this moment in time i am looking at a Crucial MX500 250GB internal SSD
* Crucial 16GB Kit (2 x 8GB) DDR3L-1600 SODIMM


Is there anything i should be aware of moving forward from here? i have downloaded the macOS High Sierra install to my desktop to save to a boot USB when i have acquired one big enough.

Any advice or pointers would be greatly recieved guys,

Mike
 

velocityg4

macrumors 603
Dec 19, 2004
6,448
3,447
Georgia
Be sure to make the installer USB useable. Don't just copy the DMG. You need to either use a Terminal Command or Diskmaker X to create a bootable installer USB.

You can get a cheap USB enclosure for the SSD. Then simply clone your boot drive with Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper. Then swap out the hard drive for the SSD.
 
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CooperBox

macrumors 65816
Nov 28, 2010
1,440
1,538
France - between Ricard & Absinthe
That MBPro 13" even with the Core2 Duo is imho still an excellent model. I have one, and also it's more powerful brother a 13" Intel Core i7 2012 model.
If I were you I'd go with either the Crucial or Samsung 250Gb SSD. Have used both with excellent results. I really think 16GB RAM would be overkill. I have 2X4Gb in one machine, and 12GB in the other, which is more than adequate for my use (photoshop and moderate editing with iMovie). The difference you save in not going for the 16Gb memory kit, put the money towards an eventual purchase of a mid 2012 13" Core i5 model. You'll not regret it. One of the best ever MBPros in terms of reliability and ease of upgrade. It's very true to say that they don't make them like that anymore, and more's the pity.
From the many tear-downs I've performed on numerous Mac models in my collection, most laptops over 5+ years of age are crying out for repasting of the CPU in order to re-establish adequate cooling.
I will shortly be posting some photos of the total refurbish I performed on my 13" Core i5 2012 13", covering some of the points not made too clear in the iFixit tear-down instructions.
 
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DynamicFuzz

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 20, 2019
9
0
United Kingdom
Be sure to make the installer USB useable. Don't just copy the DMG. You need to either use a Terminal Command or Diskmaker X to create a bootable installer USB.

You can get a cheap USB enclosure for the SSD. Then simply clone your boot drive with Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper. Then swap out the hard drive for the SSD.

Thank you for the reply.

I think i have seen this process on a youtube video - is there where you run the script from the terminal command page? In all honesty what is the easiest way to get the OS back onto a new SSD? i dont currently use time machine so am not too fussed with a fresh install rather than a clone etc. What is best practice? im all ears mate.
[automerge]1571634994[/automerge]
That MBPro 13" even with the Core2 Duo is imho still an excellent model. I have one, and also it's more powerful brother a 13" Intel Core i7 2012 model.
If I were you I'd go with either the Crucial or Samsung 250Gb SSD. Have used both with excellent results. I really think 16GB RAM would be overkill. I have 2X4Gb in one machine, and 12GB in the other, which is more than adequate for my use (photoshop and moderate editing with iMovie). The difference you save in not going for the 16Gb memory kit, put the money towards an eventual purchase of a mid 2012 13" Core i5 model. You'll not regret it. One of the best ever MBPros in terms of reliability and ease of upgrade. It's very true to say that they don't make them like that anymore, and more's the pity.
From the many tear-downs I've performed on numerous Mac models in my collection, most laptops over 5+ years of age are crying out for repasting of the CPU in order to re-establish adequate cooling.
I will shortly be posting some photos of the total refurbish I performed on my 13" Core i5 2012 13", covering some of the points not made too clear in the iFixit tear-down instructions.

Morning Cooper,

Thank you for the reply and honesty.

The 16GB RAM kits are pricey youre right. I think i will see some great results even if i opted for the 8GB upgrade. I havent used the laptop for quite a while so am just trying to revive it and get it in the best shape possible. As much as i would love a completely new Mac thats some serious outlay and am hoping these upgrades will make this feel brand new again.

Really keen to hear more about your refurb project too!! What are the differences between my current model and the Mid 2012 version?
 
Last edited:

CooperBox

macrumors 65816
Nov 28, 2010
1,440
1,538
France - between Ricard & Absinthe
(QUOTE): "Morning Cooper,

Thank you for the reply and honesty.

The 16GB RAM kits are pricey youre right. I think i will see some great results even if i opted for the 8GB upgrade. I havent used the laptop for quite a while so am just trying to revive it and get it in the best shape possible. As much as i would love a completely new Mac thats some serious outlay and am hoping these upgrades will make this feel brand new again.

Really keen to hear more about your refurb project too!! What are the differences between my current model and the Mid 2012 version?
" (UNQUOTE)

The differences between the 2 models are significant.
i) Core2 Duo ‘Penryn’ CPU, 1066MHz bus, USB2 ports, 2Gb memory standard (which I believe can only be maxed to 8Gb). Max OS 10.13.6 High-Sierra
ii) i5 'Ivy Bridge' CPU, DMI bus at 5 GT/s, USB3 ports, and 8Gb memory standard. The Intel HD Graphics 4000 also is a huge improvement. Max OS 10.15 Catalina (heaven forbid!). I'll definitely be sticking with High-Sierra though, and possibly Mojave later.
As regards a 'new' machine, keep saving hard! After looking around for over a year I found my 2012 13" Intel Core i7 2.9GHz model practically as new for just over US$450. I've since installed a 500Gb SSD, installed the original HD in place of the optical drive, and added an extra 4GB memory module. A superb machine!
 
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servenvolley

macrumors member
Jan 3, 2017
76
42
South Carolina
That MBPro 13" even with the Core2 Duo is imho still an excellent model. I have one, and also it's more powerful brother a 13" Intel Core i7 2012 model.
If I were you I'd go with either the Crucial or Samsung 250Gb SSD. Have used both with excellent results. I really think 16GB RAM would be overkill. I have 2X4Gb in one machine, and 12GB in the other, which is more than adequate for my use (photoshop and moderate editing with iMovie). The difference you save in not going for the 16Gb memory kit, put the money towards an eventual purchase of a mid 2012 13" Core i5 model. You'll not regret it. One of the best ever MBPros in terms of reliability and ease of upgrade. It's very true to say that they don't make them like that anymore, and more's the pity.
From the many tear-downs I've performed on numerous Mac models in my collection, most laptops over 5+ years of age are crying out for repasting of the CPU in order to re-establish adequate cooling.
I will shortly be posting some photos of the total refurbish I performed on my 13" Core i5 2012 13", covering some of the points not made too clear in the iFixit tear-down instructions.

If you don’t mind my asking: I have a 2012 13” Core i5 model that I bought new three years ago for my young son but he ended up barely using it (soon went PC for aviation software) and so I am considering updating the ram to 8GB and switching out the hard drive for a 256 SSD. I would make it a clean install on the software side of it so I was wondering what is the best way to do it and also what don’t I have to do beforehand on the software update side since I won’t be transferring over any data or files.
 

mick2

macrumors regular
Oct 5, 2017
214
205
UK
Thank you for the reply.

I think i have seen this process on a youtube video - is there where you run the script from the terminal command page? In all honesty what is the easiest way to get the OS back onto a new SSD? i dont currently use time machine so am not too fussed with a fresh install rather than a clone etc. What is best practice? im all ears mate.
FWIW I wouldnt bother with the bootable USB installer.

The easiest way is to buy a SATA to USB cable from Amazon, eg https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sabrent-2-5-Inch-Adapter-Optimized-EC-SSHD-USB-3-0-SSD-SATA-2-5/dp/B011M8YACM/ref=sr_1_8?crid=1DF5KZ8U5V2W&keywords=sata+to+usb+3.0&qid=1571651757&sprefix=sata+to+usb,aps,157&sr=8-8

Then download a copy of Super Duper for free https://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html

- Install this on your current machine
- Connect your new SSD to the machine with the USB cable
- Make a clone of the current drive to your new ssd
- Shutdown the mac, open it up and fit the new SSD. This will contain an exac copy of your current OS; everything will be in the same place as it was before.
- Use the old HDD connected to the USB cable you bought to start making Time Machine backups of your system every week or two.

That's it.
 
Last edited:

DynamicFuzz

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 20, 2019
9
0
United Kingdom
(QUOTE): "Morning Cooper,

Thank you for the reply and honesty.

The 16GB RAM kits are pricey youre right. I think i will see some great results even if i opted for the 8GB upgrade. I havent used the laptop for quite a while so am just trying to revive it and get it in the best shape possible. As much as i would love a completely new Mac thats some serious outlay and am hoping these upgrades will make this feel brand new again.

Really keen to hear more about your refurb project too!! What are the differences between my current model and the Mid 2012 version?
" (UNQUOTE)

The differences between the 2 models are significant.
i) Core2 Duo ‘Penryn’ CPU, 1066MHz bus, USB2 ports, 2Gb memory standard (which I believe can only be maxed to 8Gb). Max OS 10.13.6 High-Sierra
ii) i5 'Ivy Bridge' CPU, DMI bus at 5 GT/s, USB3 ports, and 8Gb memory standard. The Intel HD Graphics 4000 also is a huge improvement. Max OS 10.15 Catalina (heaven forbid!). I'll definitely be sticking with High-Sierra though, and possibly Mojave later.
As regards a 'new' machine, keep saving hard! After looking around for over a year I found my 2012 13" Intel Core i7 2.9GHz model practically as new for just over US$450. I've since installed a 500Gb SSD, installed the original HD in place of the optical drive, and added an extra 4GB memory module. A superb machine!

Sounds like its a much bigger beast and after looking at the UK pricing too it could well be an option once ive completed work on this one. Sounds like a silly question but what sort of stuff do you store on the original HD which replaced the optical? is that something you can do on my model do you know?
[automerge]1571677883[/automerge]
FWIW I wouldnt bother with the bootable USB installer.

The easiest way is to buy a SATA to USB cable from Amazon, eg https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sabrent-2-5-Inch-Adapter-Optimized-EC-SSHD-USB-3-0-SSD-SATA-2-5/dp/B011M8YACM/ref=sr_1_8?crid=1DF5KZ8U5V2W&keywords=sata+to+usb+3.0&qid=1571651757&sprefix=sata+to+usb,aps,157&sr=8-8

Then download a copy of Super Duper for free https://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html

- Install this on your current machine
- Connect your new SSD to the machine with the USB cable
- Make a clone of the current drive to your new ssd
- Shutdown the mac, open it up and fit the new SSD. This will contain an exac copy of your current OS; everything will be in the same place as it was before.
- Use the old HDD connected to the USB cable you bought to start making Time Machine backups of your system every week or two.

That's it.

I have just had a look at that Sabrent device - looks really swish and i would consider it. I take it its possible to put the new OS on there rather than clone everything that is on the HD currently?
 

mick2

macrumors regular
Oct 5, 2017
214
205
UK
I have just had a look at that Sabrent device - looks really swish and i would consider it. I take it its possible to put the new OS on there rather than clone everything that is on the HD currently?
[/QUOTE

The instructions above detail how to move your current system to a new SSD. After following them you'll have your current system exactly as it is now, but installed on a new SSD. This is usually what people do when they upgrade their hard drive.

Upgrading your system to High Sierra is really a separate procedure, and you can do this via the app store at any time you wish. You could do this now, before starting the SSD move, or later, after you're on the new SSD. Its really a separate thing from your SSD upgrade.

You could also not bother moving your current system to a new SSD, and just install a completely new copy of MacOS on your new SSD once its in the machine. You'd have none of your data, settings or apps after such an upgrade - it'd be like starting with a new just bought machine. You could use a USB installer to do this. Is this what you mean?
 
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CooperBox

macrumors 65816
Nov 28, 2010
1,440
1,538
France - between Ricard & Absinthe
If you don’t mind my asking: I have a 2012 13” Core i5 model that I bought new three years ago for my young son but he ended up barely using it (soon went PC for aviation software) and so I am considering updating the ram to 8GB and switching out the hard drive for a 256 SSD. I would make it a clean install on the software side of it so I was wondering what is the best way to do it and also what don’t I have to do beforehand on the software update side since I won’t be transferring over any data or files.

As you plan, the best way is to make a clean install and not update on top of an earler OS.
As you don't intend to transfer any files from the old OS on the original HD there are no additional steps to take in that regard.
So, take your new SSD and connect it to the Sabrent device as described above. Or use an external drive bay such as THIS which is what I use (it does the same task as the Sabrent device).
Then follow THIS guide which clearly explains the procedure.
Another excellent, more detailed guide is shown HERE which describes how to install the new OS onto a 16GB USB flash drive. The convenience here is that the flash drive can be used as often as required, if for example you wanted to install the OS on several Macs.
If you don't plan on using the optical drive in the future, why not swap it out with THIS caddy in which you can install the original HD. Once the old HD is installed, erased & formatted (Mac OS extended journaled) using disk utility, it will provide ample space for any files you download or any other personal Word docs etc.
Of couse nothing prevents you from installing a 2nd SSD in the optical drive caddy, which is what I've done with my 13" and 15" 2012 MBPros. You can't do that with the new MBPros.......;)
If you should do the latter I advise a Samsung or Crucial 120GB SSD for the OS, and 250 or 500GB SSD for the data drive (the size depending on your budget and the amount of data, videos etc you wish to store).
[automerge]1571687312[/automerge]
Sounds like its a much bigger beast and after looking at the UK pricing too it could well be an option once ive completed work on this one. Sounds like a silly question but what sort of stuff do you store on the original HD which replaced the optical? is that something you can do on my model do you know?
[automerge]1571677883[/automerge]
I have just had a look at that Sabrent device - looks really swish and i would consider it. I take it its possible to put the new OS on there rather than clone everything that is on the HD currently?
Sure you can do that, (see my earlier post above). I store my personal files, videos etc on the 2nd SSD, never on the smaller of the two SSD's which I reserve only for the OS and any newly downloaded apps.
 
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servenvolley

macrumors member
Jan 3, 2017
76
42
South Carolina
As you plan, the best way is to make a clean install and not update on top of an earler OS.
As you don't intend to transfer any files from the old OS on the original HD there are no additional steps to take in that regard.
So, take your new SSD and connect it to the Sabrent device as described above. Or use an external drive bay such as THIS which is what I use (it does the same task as the Sabrent device).
Then follow THIS guide which clearly explains the procedure.
Another excellent, more detailed guide is shown HERE which describes how to install the new OS onto a 16GB USB flash drive. The convenience here is that the flash drive can be used as often as required, if for example you wanted to install the OS on several Macs.
If you don't plan on using the optical drive in the future, why not swap it out with THIS caddy in which you can install the original HD. Once the old HD is installed, erased & formatted (Mac OS extended journaled) using disk utility, it will provide ample space for any files you download or any other personal Word docs etc.
Of couse nothing prevents you from installing a 2nd SSD in the optical drive caddy, which is what I've done with my 13" and 15" 2012 MBPros. You can't do that with the new MBPros.......;)
If you should do the latter I advise a Samsung or Crucial 120GB SSD for the OS, and 250 or 500GB SSD for the data drive (the size depending on your budget and the amount of data, videos etc you wish to store).
[automerge]1571687312[/automerge]

Sure you can do that, (see my earlier post above). I store my personal files, videos etc on the 2nd SSD, never on the smaller of the two SSD's which I reserve only for the OS and any newly downloaded apps.

Thanks for an excellent answer. If don’t mind answering one more question, which version of the Mac OS do you recommend sticking with on this particular computer?
 

CooperBox

macrumors 65816
Nov 28, 2010
1,440
1,538
France - between Ricard & Absinthe
Thanks for an excellent answer. If don’t mind answering one more question, which version of the Mac OS do you recommend sticking with on this particular computer?
I think Max OS 10.13.6 High-Sierra would be a good choice. I say this because the internal drives of Macs are converted to the latest file system APFS when installing macOS 10.14 Mojave or later, which in itself is not a problem, unless you ever wish to downgrade and re-install an earlier OS. In that case you'd have to reformat your SSD or HD to OS extended journaled, which can be a real pain as I've experienced.
You could of course install the latest OS Catalina as your MBPro9,2 is supported, although be aware that 32bit apps are not supported - that for me is a definite "No-no", and may well prove the downfall of that OS, athough the same will apply to all future OS's, more's the pity imho.
HERE's a useful link on creating a bootable USB flash installer. Using the following terminal command to install High Sierra is straight forward, even for me who was a mere novice to all this only a short while ago.
sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/MyVolume
 

DynamicFuzz

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 20, 2019
9
0
United Kingdom
The instructions above detail how to move your current system to a new SSD. After following them you'll have your current system exactly as it is now, but installed on a new SSD. This is usually what people do when they upgrade their hard drive.

Upgrading your system to High Sierra is really a separate procedure, and you can do this via the app store at any time you wish. You could do this now, before starting the SSD move, or later, after you're on the new SSD. Its really a separate thing from your SSD upgrade.

You could also not bother moving your current system to a new SSD, and just install a completely new copy of MacOS on your new SSD once its in the machine. You'd have none of your data, settings or apps after such an upgrade - it'd be like starting with a new just bought machine. You could use a USB installer to do this. Is this what you mean?

Thanks Mick,

I think just to keep things as simple as possible i would prefer a new copy of MacOS on the SSD. There is nothing currently on my macbook apart from some old GoPro videos and documents which arent crucial in coming over as part of the upgrade.

I am looking to order the SSD from crucial within the next few days - is it literally just a case of swapping out the drives and then starting afresh then? ive watched plenty of youtube videos and have convinced myself now that something is going to go wrong :(
 

mick2

macrumors regular
Oct 5, 2017
214
205
UK
Thanks Mick,

I think just to keep things as simple as possible i would prefer a new copy of MacOS on the SSD. There is nothing currently on my macbook apart from some old GoPro videos and documents which arent crucial in coming over as part of the upgrade.

I am looking to order the SSD from crucial within the next few days - is it literally just a case of swapping out the drives and then starting afresh then? ive watched plenty of youtube videos and have convinced myself now that something is going to go wrong :(
Understood. I did exactly this upgrade on my 2011 MBP using a Crucial MX300 and it is really straightforward.
- Create the bootable USB containing MacOS (look online for guides on how to do this)
- Open the MBP, fit the new SSD
- Boot the MBP using the USB drive
- Format drive using Disk Utility on the booted USB, then install MacOS
You'll be blown away at how much faster your MBP seems with the SSD. It'll be like having a new machine. I'd also echo the advice above to upgrade the RAM to 8GB while you're in there. Probably not worth going to 16GB for a general use machine of this age.
 
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DynamicFuzz

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 20, 2019
9
0
United Kingdom
Understood. I did exactly this upgrade on my 2011 MBP using a Crucial MX300 and it is really straightforward.
- Create the bootable USB containing MacOS (look online for guides on how to do this)
- Open the MBP, fit the new SSD
- Boot the MBP using the USB drive
- Format drive using Disk Utility on the booted USB, then install MacOS
You'll be blown away at how much faster your MBP seems with the SSD. It'll be like having a new machine. I'd also echo the advice above to upgrade the RAM to 8GB while you're in there. Probably not worth going to 16GB for a general use machine of this age.

This is perfect thanks Mick, i really appreciate it.

Once i have secured the SSD next step will be the RAM upgrades, I think after the advice ive been given on here i will be looking at the 8GB kit instead of the 16GB to keep the costs down. Have you every connected this particular model macbook Pro to a larger screen? i have been looking at the connectors and think its a Mini Displayport to HDMI adaptor i would need.

 

Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
22,745
8,581
Upgrading a 2010 MBP is easy, anyone can do it.

BUT...
Unless you already bought it, I'd suggest skipping the big RAM upgrade.
Instead, buy JUST ONE 8gb soDIMM and install that into "the top slot" when you have the back off.
That will give you 10gb of installed RAM -- plenty. Less cost.

BE SURE TO USE THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR OPENING THE MBP (shouting intentional).
You need a Phillips #00 driver for the screws on the back, and a TORX T-6 driver to take "the nubs" off the old drive and put them into the new one.

You don't really need to disconnect the battery. I didn't and things went fine for me.

Also...
I'd suggest you buy a USB3 2.5" external enclosure. They're CHEAP.
You can put the old HDD into it and use it as a backup, extra storage, etc.

Also...
IF you get the enclosure, you can use it to PREPARE AND TEST the new SSD BEFORE you actually install it.
Doing it this way is a better way, because if something doesn't work, you STILL HAVE A WORKING MACBOOK with which to diagnose problems.

How big is the HDD in the MBP now?
250?
or.. 500?
If you buy an SSD that's the same size, you can download CarbonCopyCloner and just "clone over" the contents of the HDD to the SSD (using the external enclosure).
Then... swap the drives and upgrade the RAM.

This will get you going quickly.
Get the drives swapped and the MacBook working.
THEN worry about upgrading the OS later on.
Keep the process simple.
If problems occur, doing it this way makes it easier to overcome them and move on.
 
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DynamicFuzz

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 20, 2019
9
0
United Kingdom
Upgrading a 2010 MBP is easy, anyone can do it.

BUT...
Unless you already bought it, I'd suggest skipping the big RAM upgrade.
Instead, buy JUST ONE 8gb soDIMM and install that into "the top slot" when you have the back off.
That will give you 10gb of installed RAM -- plenty. Less cost.

BE SURE TO USE THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR OPENING THE MBP (shouting intentional).
You need a Phillips #00 driver for the screws on the back, and a TORX T-6 driver to take "the nubs" off the old drive and put them into the new one.

You don't really need to disconnect the battery. I didn't and things went fine for me.

Also...
I'd suggest you buy a USB3 2.5" external enclosure. They're CHEAP.
You can put the old HDD into it and use it as a backup, extra storage, etc.

Also...
IF you get the enclosure, you can use it to PREPARE AND TEST the new SSD BEFORE you actually install it.
Doing it this way is a better way, because if something doesn't work, you STILL HAVE A WORKING MACBOOK with which to diagnose problems.

How big is the HDD in the MBP now?
250?
or.. 500?
If you buy an SSD that's the same size, you can download CarbonCopyCloner and just "clone over" the contents of the HDD to the SSD (using the external enclosure).
Then... swap the drives and upgrade the RAM.

This will get you going quickly.
Get the drives swapped and the MacBook working.
THEN worry about upgrading the OS later on.
Keep the process simple.
If problems occur, doing it this way makes it easier to overcome them and move on.
Fishrrman you are Mythical!!

Thank you for breaking this down for me and making me feel alot more positive going forward with the upgrades. I`ll give you a laugh.. I had to search what an enclosure is and honestly i would have never have thought of doing that!! great stuff and saves me buying an external drive (i nearly did)

The HDD is 250 now but thinking of upping to 500GB - I would never fill it but i guess its piece of mind, what do you think? will the Crucial MX500 still be ok? i have heard alot of good things about this one.

RAM... Sounds like a silly question but will that work? i thought they came in kits of 2 because they had to be the same etc.. If thats the case i will more than likely opt for the 8GB stick now, it will be perfect for helping me get those GoPro videos completed quicker.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
22,745
8,581
"will the Crucial MX500 still be ok?"

It should do fine.
Use CarbonCopyCloner to clone the 250 drive to the 500 drive. EASY as it gets.

"RAM... Sounds like a silly question but will that work?"

Yes.
1 8b soDIMM may be "all that you'll ever need". (see comments on 4k video below)
It will work fine with the 2gb soDIMM in the lower slot and give you 10gb of installed RAM.
Just be sure to buy "the right RAM".
Here's the source I recommend:

Hmmmm....
Are the GoPro videos 4k?
In that case, IF you are using Final Cut Pro, BE SURE to use the option to create "proxy media" for editing. Will go much more smoothly.
If that still "wasn't enough", you could always add a 2nd 8gb soDIMM later on.

Be aware that a 2010 MBPro is getting a little "long in the tooth" for 4k editing at all. But it still should be "do-able".
 
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DynamicFuzz

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 20, 2019
9
0
United Kingdom
"will the Crucial MX500 still be ok?"

It should do fine.
Use CarbonCopyCloner to clone the 250 drive to the 500 drive. EASY as it gets.

"RAM... Sounds like a silly question but will that work?"

Yes.
1 8b soDIMM may be "all that you'll ever need". (see comments on 4k video below)
It will work fine with the 2gb soDIMM in the lower slot and give you 10gb of installed RAM.
Just be sure to buy "the right RAM".
Here's the source I recommend:

Hmmmm....
Are the GoPro videos 4k?
In that case, IF you are using Final Cut Pro, BE SURE to use the option to create "proxy media" for editing. Will go much more smoothly.
If that still "wasn't enough", you could always add a 2nd 8gb soDIMM later on.

Be aware that a 2010 MBPro is getting a little "long in the tooth" for 4k editing at all. But it still should be "do-able".

Hey dude, sorry for late reply.

Oh god no, i think the MBP would blow up. 1080p 60fps with Flux.

Been looking at some different options over the last few days and it echoes what you and the guys above have said also. I dont want to be spending a fortune on an old system. I am now looking at an integral 250GB SSD from mymemory.com which is around £25 ($32) and maybe a 2x4GB kit which is also around £25. Price wise its certainly more attractive and i cant escape the fact that the system is just for day to day use and nothing too taxing.
 
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