New to programming overall

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by Shadylane318, May 3, 2012.

  1. Shadylane318 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2012
    #1
    Hey guys,

    I'm looking to learn how to program in java, C, C++, and any other program required to build on the mac & iOS. Do you have any tips? Should I sign up for a local college course? Any online courses? Also, do you have to be really good with math or is that only for building iOS games?

    Thanks,

    Dan
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    Take a look at the stickies at the top of the forum.
     
  3. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
  4. BanterClaus macrumors regular

    BanterClaus

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    http://codeacademy.com

    To learn the basic fundamentals of programming start here. Also you don't need much Math for the basics. I suck at Math and I'm studying Computing at college and I'm finding it absolutely fine.
     
  5. Tander macrumors 6502a

    Tander

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    #5
    I would advise against this. That site doesn't show you Objective C nor does it show you C. You should learn both languages first.

    The site above looks like it is for Java - a language iOS doesn't use.
     
  6. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #6
    If you want to program on iOS, you need to know C and Obj-C. C++ is optional.
    If you want to program on OS X, you have a variety of options including C, Obj-C, C++, Java, Python, etc.
    As far as being good at math (I hate when people say "good at math",) it depends on what you mean:
    - Do you need to be able to calculate numbers quickly?
    No, you're using a computer. It'll calculate numbers for you.
    - Do you need to be able to understand math theoretically?
    Yes, but it's not a pre-req so much as a co-req you may not even notice.

    To explain: I started programming when I was in the 8th grade. I was horrid at Algebra before I started learning to program. As I learned to program, I began to "get" Algebra. By the end of high school, I was sent to a national math competition as an A team representative from my state. People tell me I'm "good at math"... but... IDK, I need a calculator. I make arithmetic mistakes all the time if I don't use a calculator.

    So... don't worry about math I suppose. You're going to learn what you need to learn.

    Now, back to languages...

    To learn C, I suggest this free ebook, "Learn C The Hard Way". By "hard", they mean "right". It teaches you to look stuff up on your own. You could get an "easy" book to learn C that will tell you exactly how to do everything, but the issue is, once you reach the end of an "easy" book,

    1 - You won't understand it as well as you should.
    2 - You won't know how to go forward on your own.

    "Learn C The Hard Way" solves them by
    1 - Making you look some things up on your own. It's like doing homework in addition to, rather than only, attending class.
    2 - You'll understand how to look up the things you need to go forward and do your own projects without having your hand held.

    Here's the link:
    http://c.learncodethehardway.org/book/
    To move onto Obj-C, it is absolutely essential that you're able to do exercises 0-14. However, learning the rest will be helpful, particularly if you want to onto C++.

    For learning Obj-C, I suggest Stanford iOS tutorials available for free through iTunes U. (This also rolls in the iOS SDK and Xcode.)
     
  7. BanterClaus macrumors regular

    BanterClaus

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    Fair comment. I only suggested this as it's good for teaching the very basics such as iteration, selection etc.
     
  8. firewood macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #8
    Not important. The OP needs to learn to program first. Picking up a more appropriate programming language can come later. For starters one should pick the easiest language or available teaching methodology from which to learn the general concepts, ideas and skills of programming (any language). And neither C nor Objective C were in any way designed for educational or tutorial purposes. That makes them much better 2nd or 3rd languages.
     
  9. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #9
    Just like "human" languages, some people can learn several programming languages while other can't, or at least have a harder time of it.

    Most often though, beginners will take a while to lose their "accent" if the language they learn first is not closely related to their end goal.

    B
     
  10. Tander macrumors 6502a

    Tander

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    #10
    Good point, I didn't see it from that view.

    Still think it would be better to learn a language closer to that of your goal. But, we all have different learning methods and style and I didn't account for that.
     
  11. mcman77 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2011
    #11
    Thank you for this! very helpful post. I was wondering if there is a way to download that ebook?

    Will it be easier for a junior PHP dev to learn Obj-c?

    EDIT: also i'm currently not using OSX, is there a way to develop on windows?
     
  12. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #12
    For iOS, the only sanctioned way of developing is with Xcode, which is only available on Mac OSX. For Mac OSX... I suspect Mac OSX apps can be built on Windows but I don't know how.

    In Learning C The Hard Way, the author suggests setting up a Linux virtual machine if you're on Windows.

    If you'd like to pay, there's also this:
    http://www.macincloud.com/

    Of course, if you're going to pay, you may as well just buy a Mac Mini ($600 new... if you keep an eye on Apple's refurbished Mac Minis, you might be able to get one for as low as $500... or buy one used for who knows how cheap.)
     
  13. mcman77 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2011
    #13
    I might be getting a mac by october this year if I manage to save enough but I need to start development before, like yesterday.

    Can I develop iOS on Linux then?

    Are you familiar with PHP?

    And finally, can I download that book?
     
  14. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #14
    You're not ready to start learning iOS. You need to learn some C first. Normally I recommend spending at least 2 weeks learning the basics of it, but there's no harm in spending the next six months getting very good at using it while you wait to get a Mac.

    No... I'm currently learning C++. I need to start learning some web development stuff soon.

    It's all HTML... I don't see why you wouldn't be able to download it...
     

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