Newbie Developer... should I buy ADC select

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by I'm a Mac, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. I'm a Mac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    #1
    First of all, I apologize if this seems like my 100th question on ADC, but for a newbie developer, what are the perks of joining besides pre-release software and hardware discounts. Any current members, I'd love to hear what you have to say about it. Last year, I would've killed to be able to test leopard before it came out, but this year, there's no new operating system. Anyway, I was just wondering if it was worth it... and what all of the benefits are.
     
  2. kainjow Moderator emeritus

    kainjow

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2000
    #2
    I don't think it's worth it. If you're a student go for the student developer account - much better value. I had the select last year mainly for Leopard, but I don't see much use for it this year unless they release 10.6 betas at WWDC...
     
  3. I'm a Mac thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    #3
    If I am an ADC select member, can I call tech support and have them help me with an xcode/ dashcode project?
     
  4. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #4
    Well only twice a year (and I think it is by e-mail not sure on that). Not really worth it for the kinds of problems you will have. Just ask here and people will be able to help.

    The help provided to select and premier members is really designed for major problems in commercial applications not for people starting to learn how to program. Google will be the best resource available to you for quite some time (and here of course :)).
     
  5. Denarius macrumors 6502a

    Denarius

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Location:
    Gironde, France
    #5
    I'll second that, having reached the stage where I have had a few problems where there's been no solutions that I could find on Google, the folks on here have been an absolute godsend.
     
  6. yeroen macrumors 6502a

    yeroen

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Cambridge, MA
    #6
    The benefits are generally much less than compared to say the Microsoft developer program, a world where you have to pay handsomely for anything more than Visual Studio express.

    Mac OS X, being a special UNIX variant, is a much more developer friendly platform. Much of it (OS X's Darwin component) is completely open source.

    I'd say it's only worth it if it's on someone else's dime, e.g. if your employer or University department is paying for it
     
  7. I'm a Mac thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    #7
    But no one answers my questions :( look at my other post.. http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=472935

    P.S. are there any really good resources for starting with xcode 3?
     
  8. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #8
    If you don't find much help in a forum, it's usually a problem with your question. People are great when you ask a very specific question, like when you get as far as you can on your own but get stumped by one particular concrete detail.

    You'll have less success with very general "explain to me what I'm supposed to be doing here" sorts of questions. Many of us have learned from hard experience, both online and in real life, to recognize the sorts of requests that are likely to devolve into solving your problem for you as an example of how to solve your problem.

    The short answer to the question in that other thread is, "once you understand what XMLRPC is, there's not a lot to be confused about." People are going to be wary of trying to teach you that from first principles in the forum.
     
  9. I'm a Mac thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    #9
    Thank you for answering my question. I just have one more question... how do I implement XMLRPC in an Xcode or dashcode project?
     
  10. nerd macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2004
    #10
    The last time I checked the hardware discount pretty much offset the cost of the membership. So it might make sense if you're planning on getting a new machine anyway.
     
  11. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #11
    There are several OS X-compatible free implementations on the site I linked.

    Also, the Web Services Framework provides this functionality natively, though some of the free implementations seem to have been developed in response to claimed shortcomings in Apple's implementation.
     
  12. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #12
    That is a very good point, and the select membership gives you a discount every year I believe. Still, it depends if you are likely to get a new computer regularly or not.
     
  13. I'm a Mac thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    #13
    I guess if I was getting a new computer it would be worth it... are there any one to one sessions you get as a member without purchasing an WWDC ticket?
     
  14. Denarius macrumors 6502a

    Denarius

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Location:
    Gironde, France
    #14
    I know what you mean: I started looking at XCode a few months ago, but there was bugger all documentation for XCode 3, so I decided to save confusing myself and wait for the documentation to catch up with the technology. Started playing with Ruby instead and it rocks. :)

    I think perhaps one obstacle that you may have with iphone development as compared to Mac development is that there are simply far fewer people doing it at the moment. You may find that if you start tackling OSX projects there'll be a lot more people who've got the knowledge to help you, and by the time you get to the iPhone you'll be experienced enough to solve your own problem.

    That said, there seem to be a few more iPhone related problems cropping up on this forum, so maybe I'm wrong. :)
     
  15. I'm a Mac thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    #15
    I might buy it just for the tech support incident.... there's a program I really want to make and I'm in over my head in programming, and although forums are helpful, I think I need to talk to a person and have them help me with my project... has ADC ever helped someone build their project?
     
  16. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Location:
    /dev/null
    #16
    It sounds like you nearly want them to build your project for you, which isn't really what the technical support incident is for. Plus, spending $500 just to get a couple support incidents? :confused:

    In that case you can just buy them separately:
    http://developer.apple.com/products/technicalsupport.html
     
  17. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #17
    That's why you didn't get a response to begin with. You're trying to dive headfirst into the deep end. You need to back up and realize this project is over your head for now. If it's a personal project, put it on the shelf and start learning the basics. If it's a commercial project, start thinking about hiring somebody.

    ADC support is not for cases like yours. I've known people who have worked developer support (not for Apple), and they're full of war stories that end with cutting off support for people who are trying to use the support line as a cheap development contractor.

    It's your baby. You've got to carry it.
     
  18. I'm a Mac thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    #18
    I guess you're right, I was to ambitious. But what made me frustrated was when I tried to create a hello, world app in Xcode, like the book says,
    it fails... check my other post @ http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=473123
     
  19. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #19
    You need to be more explicit when you ask for help with programming problems. It is very hard to help you with the information you have provided in the thread you have linked.
     
  20. lucasgladding macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2007
    Location:
    Waterloo, Ontario
    #20
    Good point Denarius:

    I would highly recommend Agile Web Development with Rails even if you don't do any development for the web. I found that the book really helped reinforce MVC patterns and gave me some ideas about how to clean up code in my development projects on the Mac. Looking through the iPhone SDK examples as well as mmalc's page on cocoa bindings should help get new developers in the right frame of mind.

    In response to the original post:

    Frankly, I wouldn't suggest writing anything meant for the public until you have finished a few fairly complex personal applications (my first app was a payroll application for Canada) and read at least a couple books on Mac OS X development.

    Most error messages you receive in the Xcode console can be found with some time on Google. Posting error messages on forums probably won't get you any help in most cases. If you can't find anything online after a serious attempt, list a few of the steps you have tried to correct the problem and some guesses as to what the cause may be. If you don't get a detailed response, you may at least get a push in the right direction.
     

Share This Page