Newbie Q's Anti-Virus/Adjust Level

Discussion in 'iMac' started by DogCatMSMac, Nov 21, 2014.

  1. DogCatMSMac macrumors member

    DogCatMSMac

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2014
    #1
    Hi Guys, a short intro. In the 70's I used a large mainframe with punchcards a few time for class projects. I graduated with a worthless degree so in the 80's went back to school where I used a Commodore and an Apple, liked the Apple. When I went to work they were using IBMs with DOS, I asked the IT manager why don't we use Apple? "Because there are 10 time more programs with IBM."- End of Conversation. So after years of using Windows I got a iMac r5K, why?, not sure, just felt right. I do CAD work so I still need Windows, here are a few questions-

    - I've read some people here saying don't bother with anti-virus, but I'm using Windows with Parallels so should I definitely install something? One person said that with Mac no need, just don't visit shaky sites, impossible!

    - I sure wish I could lower the screen. I notice that bar seems to be made of metal, can you successfully apply pressure and bring the screen lower?

    - Sure wish there was a Split Vertical or similar command in Yosemite to quickly bring order to the windows on the screen, anything like that?

    I'll probably have more questions, I appreciate your help. This is a great forum, lots of activity.
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    In your Windows installation, sure. For native OS X, there's no need, as long as you practice safe computing.
    There's a bit more to it on OS X than that, but it's pretty close. Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 12 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). 3rd party antivirus apps are not necessary to keep a Mac malware-free, as long as a user practices safe computing, as described in the following link.
    Read the What security steps should I take? section of the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ for tips on practicing safe computing.

    No, there is no screen height adjustment on an iMac.
     
  3. grandM macrumors 6502a

    grandM

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2013
    #3
    There are viruses [could be malware, not sure of the term] for macOS too but the unix base makes it pretty solid. Actually one of the biggest mistakes in Windows is people acting all the time as admin. MacOS always asks for a password for major things even in admin role. That being said malware etc does exists. I am running a free avast and now and then I get a pop-up with a potential threat. As it is free I do not see why you would not install it.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    There have been viruses in the wild for Mac OS 9 and earlier, but there has never been a virus in the wild for OS X in the 13+ years since its release. Trojans, yes, a few. Viruses, none.
    False. There is no real-world disadvantage in running as an admin user. In fact, it's the default account that most Mac users operate on.
    That's exactly why there's no disadvantage in running an admin account.
     
  5. grandM macrumors 6502a

    grandM

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2013
    #5
    I corrected indeed to malware

    I was comparing to MsWindows, where it is not safe using the admin all the time. I opposed it to MacOS which is more solid proof as major changes require a password even in admin role.

    In agreement
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    You're absolutely right. I misread your initial statement, which was, indeed, referring to Windows.
     
  7. TheBearman macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Location:
    Cary, NC
    #7
    Here's my 2 cents on antivirus. I'm required to run it by my company. It's not for my protection as much as it is for the folks I work with. Although I could easily receive a virus which has no effect on me the last thing they want to see if me passing this on to their network.

    As for you, if you're sharing unknown files with your windows environment it is possible to cause an issue with it. You wouldn't need a Mac based AV program, you could look at a windows option instead.
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    There are certainly situations like yours that require you to run antivirus in order to access a network. In such cases, you can use ClamXav for OS X, which detects both Windows and Mac malware, isn't a resource hog and can be used to run scans when you want, rather than constantly running, consuming system resources.
     
  9. Chippy99, Nov 22, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2014

    Chippy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    #9
    The trojan threat should not be underestimated imho. There are a few trojans out there that can infect Macs and if you are prone to visiting the occasional er, "dodgy" site, then this is a real risk. It's not only adult sites. If you are looking for a particular torrent, or even worse a crack or serial number, you are at risk. The criminals who write these things doubtless upload them loads of other places I can't even think of.

    The only safeguards are to either units Java completely, or to install some kind of AntiVirus product. Uninstalling Java may not be an acceptable option for some, since it might be needed for that game your grandchild plays when he/she is over (or whatever).

    I really do think it comes down to that. If you have Java installed, you should install an AV product. That's my view.
     
  10. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #10
    The only prudent safeguard is to not install pirated software at all, but rather get software only from legitimate, trustworthy sites.
     
  11. Chippy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    #11
    Well that's certainly true. But that doesn't address the other points I raised, does it.
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #12
    There was no need to address the other points.
     
  13. kazmac macrumors 603

    kazmac

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    On the sliver scream
    #13
    use the free anti-virus program ClamXav it works

    Hate to say this but I found something viral for the first time on my 2010 iMac last night. Used the free ClamXav to get rid of it.

    I am sure it's due to a variety of weird sites I've accidentally opened lately (probably in the last week), but I am glad to have that program and it is free. As for me, back to being Captain Careful as far as link clicks.
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #14
    Odds are very good that it was a Windows-based malware, and not one that could affect your Mac, which are far more rare.
     
  15. kazmac macrumors 603

    kazmac

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    On the sliver scream
    #15
    I know you know a lot, but whatever it was hijacked my admin password, so I had to do a complete erase of the system HD since I could not access Terminal.

    I do not have Windows on my iMac either.

    At any rate, I am sure I will be fine; but I am definitely reinstalling ClamXav and deploying FileVault 2 once I am back up and running tonight. And avoiding the unknown clickables...

    Do not want to panic the OP, as this was definitely avoidable. I am thankfully in a place where it's not the computer that is the worry, it is a small amount of data and the admin override.

    It happens.
     
  16. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #16
    I'm sure you know this, but to be clear for those who may not, it is possible to have Windows-malware infected files on your Mac, even if you don't have Windows installed. Such malware cannot execute or create problems on OS X, but could cause problems if you sent such files to an unprotected Windows computer.
     
  17. kazmac macrumors 603

    kazmac

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    On the sliver scream
    #17
    Yup, this thought did cross my mind as I am sending word files to and from work to the home machine. So much for doing homework cross-platform. My work PC has been reimaged due to viruses. Shrugs. As you say it is rare so...
     
  18. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #18
    As another alternative, if your company permits it, you could connect to your work computer remotely from your Mac via TeamViewer and work that way. That would not require sharing files between your Mac and Windows. For more details on sharing files cross-platform, see the "What about sending files to Windows users?" section of the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ I posted earlier.
     
  19. kazmac macrumors 603

    kazmac

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    On the sliver scream
    #19
    thanks for that tip

    Thanks for the info, I'll skip as it is smarter if I just avoid using Word outside of work. <grumbles, guess I have to learn to use Pages now...>:p

    Yay! My iMac is back in my control: she's like a Timex, takes a lickin' but keeps on ticking. Take that, virus! :D
     
  20. Chippy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    #20
    Perhaps you misunderstood.

    What I was suggesting is that your post is misleading. Your post would seem to imply that providing you don't install pirated software, you are risk free. As I said in my post (the bits you didn't address) this is not the case, as I am sure you would agree. Merely searching in the wrong places (for a perfectly legitimate torrent, for example) can lead you to inadvertently downloading a trojan.
     
  21. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #21
    That's not true, if you practice safe computing. Simply visiting a website or simply downloading a file does not infect your Mac. For infection to occur, something must be installed. See the links in post #2 in this thread for tips on practicing safe computing. I agree that installing apps from torrent sites can introduce a Trojan, but simply visiting such sites or downloading non-executable files will not.
     
  22. Chippy99, Nov 25, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2014

    Chippy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    #22
    I don't think you are right there mate. From time to time JAVA vulnerabilities have been found where trojans can get installed without user consent (Backdoor.OSX.SabPub.a or SX/Sabpab-A for example).
     
  23. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #23
    If you look at the links I posted, disabling Java in the browser (newer versions of OS X don't have it installed, by default) is the third tip in practicing safe computing.
     
  24. Chippy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    #24
    I wish you'd stop trying to score points and just accept it when other people make helpful contributions. Perhaps you'd benefit from reading my opening post in this thread.
     
  25. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #25
    It's not about "scoring points" but making sure that misinformation isn't posted. I certainly recognize that many, including you, make very helpful contributions. Occasionally, additional or corrective information is needed to make sure readers aren't misinformed. I've read your opening post, as well as every post in this thread. Having Java installed for apps is different from having Java installed in your web browser.
     

Share This Page